PDA

View Full Version : Introducing a new cat...


Bigs
July 25th 06, 06:20 PM
Hello,

I have a 1 year old female cat at home and I just recently introduced
(last night) a new male cat (saved him from Humane Society).

This morning, my female cat started to hiss and groan at me and decided
to take matters on my back pack. Fecal matter all over my bag. I was
not able to even talk to her I would get groans and hisses. As I'm the
master, I'm thinking she's very jelous. Although she is a VERY
independant cat and does like human affection much, she is very jelous.
After this little situation, she was OK with me and I was able to pet
her. But I'm sure I'm not out of the woods with this.

Meanwhile, I'm keeping the new cat in a room confined with his litter
box, food and water. Recommended for 7 to 14 days (as the Humane
Society recommends).

What has been your success in introducing a new cat to an exsisting
one? Any tips I should follow? Anything would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks

Marc

Alison
July 25th 06, 09:30 PM
"Bigs" > wrote in message
ups.com...
> Hello,
>
> I have a 1 year old female cat at home and I just recently introduced
> (last night) a new male cat (saved him from Humane Society).
>
> This morning, my female cat started to hiss and groan at me and decided
> to take matters on my back pack. Fecal matter all over my bag. I was
> not able to even talk to her I would get groans and hisses. As I'm the
> master, I'm thinking she's very jelous. Although she is a VERY
> independant cat and does like human affection much, she is very jelous.
> After this little situation, she was OK with me and I was able to pet
> her. But I'm sure I'm not out of the woods with this.
>
> Meanwhile, I'm keeping the new cat in a room confined with his litter
> box, food and water. Recommended for 7 to 14 days (as the Humane
> Society recommends).
>
> What has been your success in introducing a new cat to an exsisting
> one? Any tips I should follow? Anything would be greatly appreciated.
>
> Thanks
>
> Marc>>

Well done for give an unwanted cat a home
There's lots of info on this link about introducing cats.
http://messybeast.com/first-impressions.htm

--
Alison
http://catinfolinks.mysite.wanadoo-members.co.uk/
http://doginfolinks.mysite.wanadoo-members.co.uk/

JJ
July 25th 06, 10:53 PM
Keep cats separate for a while - then after 14 days (after they have
had some time to slowly adjust to scent of one another) do one or more
of the following:

1. Make sure all cats in the home are FELV and FIV negative and
vaccinated, and neutered. (glad you rescued one from the shelter - way
to go!)
2. INtroduce them and allow them to interact under close supervision,
keep a spray bottle handy (water only) should a fight erupt.
3. Expect hissing and fussing, if a physical altercation occurs -
separate for a while and keep trying.
4. Give love and attention to both - particularly your original cat to
instill a sense of security. Don't leave any dirty laundry or bags on
the floor - they are an invitation for the one cat to leave a message
of discontent.
5. If it goes well, let them stay out a while together, then -
separate again at bedtime or if you are not there to supervise them. I
would not leave them alone together for a while - until you are
ABSOLUTELY sure they are getting along well.

Here are some pointers to help a cat friendship develop and potentially
flourish:

1. Feed them canned food at the same time, do this in separate dishes
but somewhat near one another.....over several days repeat the process,
gradually getting the dishes closer each time.... For most cats -
canned food is a treat - cats do not usually fight over food like dogs.
In some cases cats that hate one another will compromise long enough
to eat a treat at the same time. **make the food some really delicious
stuff that they both go crazy over such as some tasty canned cat food.


They will learn to associate one another with something pleasant and
positive.

2. Get a feather toy on a long stick and initiate (and remain involved
in - through interactive play) a play session. Sometimes cats will
become so jubilant about playing they forget about the fact that a
"new" cat is around. If cats start interacting positively - as in
playing - then gradually step back and see if they will start playing.
If playing is too stimulating then - stop short - and play with each
kitty individually while the other watches....

3. Cat nip - It sometimes lightens the cats mood and makes them happy
and playful. If consumed it makes them relaxed, often cats like to
injest a little of it. Use sparingly.

4. Add a few additional litterboxes to your home so that if any
territorial issues emerge there are plenty of CORRECT places for cats
to go. Use a brand of litter called cat attract until kitties start
getting along.

5. Buy a kitty card board scratcher as an outlet for frustration and
release of energy and
appropriate clawing which is good for cats. this will release tension
for the cat.

GIVE CATS time - and make sure one is not bullying the other. Good
luck. Jen

PS: Occassionally I have crated cats (in a super large dog crate) and
brought them into the home where my other cats get a chance to slowly
evaluate the new cat - the new cat is not really invading their space
and they can come up and sniff the new cat without being threatened. I
leave the new cat in crate for quite a few days with litter box and
food - this has also worked well - but is an alternative method of cat
introductiion. The new cat does not get run of the house right away
and former cats do not have their territory threatened or compromised.

Cheers,



Bigs wrote:
> Hello,
>
> I have a 1 year old female cat at home and I just recently introduced
> (last night) a new male cat (saved him from Humane Society).
>
> This morning, my female cat started to hiss and groan at me and decided
> to take matters on my back pack. Fecal matter all over my bag. I was
> not able to even talk to her I would get groans and hisses. As I'm the
> master, I'm thinking she's very jelous. Although she is a VERY
> independant cat and does like human affection much, she is very jelous.
> After this little situation, she was OK with me and I was able to pet
> her. But I'm sure I'm not out of the woods with this.
>
> Meanwhile, I'm keeping the new cat in a room confined with his litter
> box, food and water. Recommended for 7 to 14 days (as the Humane
> Society recommends).
>
> What has been your success in introducing a new cat to an exsisting
> one? Any tips I should follow? Anything would be greatly appreciated.
>
> Thanks
>
> Marc

Bigs
July 26th 06, 04:38 PM
Thank you for the replies! This is great info!

Just an update:

When I came back from work yesterday, she had vomitted and deposited
fecal matter in the closet and on both couch and chairs. Luckily I was
smart and covered all the furniture! :o)

Overnight she did not do anything! The big test is to see what she has
done today! I will keep you updated on the progress!

The male cat we took in is used to other cats and dogs! He has been
shelted many times. (We are his 4th owners and last ones also!)

Marc

Bigs
July 31st 06, 04:24 PM
UPDATE:

Samba, my resident cat was not eating much, she even went 12 hours
without eating. While the new cat is in his room. Well this weekend I
was getting scared as she hadn't eaten in a long time and I know it's
not good. So after 7 days, I let my new cat out. His name is Tango
btw.

Samba hissed a few times at him without any contact. After 10 minutes,
she ate. Phew... I guess all she wanted is to meet the new guy!
Anyways, one whole day of them meeting, she still hisses at him and
he's back in the room for today as I don't want them unsupervised.

Tonight, I will let him out again. He knows she's the boss but she
keeps bullying him! I guess that can go for a few more weeks. So far,
no physical abuse.