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Cheryl
August 5th 06, 01:51 AM
All of the old driving instructions that I remember said that if
you came across a mattress on the road to drive over it. Or am I
remembering wrong? Today is the second time I've seen this - a
vehicle on the side of the road with a mattress wedged between the
tires and the wheel well.

It was a normal drive to work, and the last part of my commute is
open highway where the majority of the traffic is heading the other
way (wish the whole way could be like this!) so when everyone hits
the open part, they speed up. I noticed up ahead everyone hitting
their brakes, then when I got there, I saw a mattress in the middle
of one of the lanes, and a metro bus actually swerved around it
(had to be scary for the passengers!) and I thought the bus was
going to tip over. Up ahead about 50 feet was a pickup truck
pulled over, the driver standing outside the vehicle looking at it
as if trying to figure out how to get the mattress out from under
the truck. It was all lodged in the wheel well. Yeesh. From where
the other mattress was (maybe that part was the box spring) and
where the truck was pulled over, I can't imagine what it felt like
to have to pull over with that underneath? Wild.

--
Cheryl

Cheryl
August 5th 06, 02:16 AM
On Fri 04 Aug 2006 08:55:45p, Cheryl Perkins wrote in
rec.pets.cats.anecdotes ):

> Cheryl > wrote:
>> All of the old driving instructions that I remember said that
>> if you came across a mattress on the road to drive over it. Or
>> am I remembering wrong? Today is the second time I've seen
>> this - a vehicle on the side of the road with a mattress wedged
>> between the tires and the wheel well.
>
> Surely this isn't a common problem? I don't recall ever getting
> any instructions on what to do if I saw a mattress in the road.
> I got instructions about objects in general - avoid if it's
> possible to do so safely.
>

Honestly, I wouldn't think it's a common problem, but I've seen
this exact scenario twice now in a relatively short period of time
on the roads that I travel. However, the instruction I seem to
remember was from years and years ago, but I never thought I'd
actually need to remember it. A mattress on the road? But here
you have it. Twice in a short period of time, not to mention all
the mattresses I've seen on the side of the roads, also likely lost
from the vehicle moving it.

Which brings me back to my question: If you were to see something
large and flat drop off of a truck in front of you, would you run
over it or swerve to miss it, and maybe hit some other car? I
still seem to remember being told you're supposed to drive over it.
LOL Don't mind me. I ponder weird stuff like this sometimes. I'm
just glad I missed something that happened earlier this week, since
I was stuck in the resulting traffic jam. (salsa?) A tractor
trailor overturned and spilled out 20,000 lbs of frozen veggies all
over the highway.

--
Cheryl

Joy
August 5th 06, 02:51 AM
"Cheryl" > wrote in message
...
> On Fri 04 Aug 2006 08:55:45p, Cheryl Perkins wrote in
> rec.pets.cats.anecdotes ):
>
>> Cheryl > wrote:
>>> All of the old driving instructions that I remember said that
>>> if you came across a mattress on the road to drive over it. Or
>>> am I remembering wrong? Today is the second time I've seen
>>> this - a vehicle on the side of the road with a mattress wedged
>>> between the tires and the wheel well.
>>
>> Surely this isn't a common problem? I don't recall ever getting
>> any instructions on what to do if I saw a mattress in the road.
>> I got instructions about objects in general - avoid if it's
>> possible to do so safely.
>>
>
> Honestly, I wouldn't think it's a common problem, but I've seen
> this exact scenario twice now in a relatively short period of time
> on the roads that I travel. However, the instruction I seem to
> remember was from years and years ago, but I never thought I'd
> actually need to remember it. A mattress on the road? But here
> you have it. Twice in a short period of time, not to mention all
> the mattresses I've seen on the side of the roads, also likely lost
> from the vehicle moving it.
>
> Which brings me back to my question: If you were to see something
> large and flat drop off of a truck in front of you, would you run
> over it or swerve to miss it, and maybe hit some other car? I
> still seem to remember being told you're supposed to drive over it.
> LOL Don't mind me. I ponder weird stuff like this sometimes. I'm
> just glad I missed something that happened earlier this week, since
> I was stuck in the resulting traffic jam. (salsa?) A tractor
> trailor overturned and spilled out 20,000 lbs of frozen veggies all
> over the highway.
>
> --
> Cheryl

I do my best to avoid hitting or driving over anything that's lying in the
road, and certainly something as thick as a mattress is a thing I'd want to
avoid.

Incidentally, items fall off trucks a lot. In the Los Angeles area, one of
the traffic reporters on the radio station I listen to is often referred to
as the president of Freeway Furniture Company.

Joy

badwilson
August 5th 06, 03:19 AM
Cheryl wrote:
> On Fri 04 Aug 2006 08:55:45p, Cheryl Perkins wrote in
> rec.pets.cats.anecdotes ):
>
>> Cheryl > wrote:
>>> All of the old driving instructions that I remember said that
>>> if you came across a mattress on the road to drive over it. Or
>>> am I remembering wrong? Today is the second time I've seen
>>> this - a vehicle on the side of the road with a mattress wedged
>>> between the tires and the wheel well.
>>
>> Surely this isn't a common problem? I don't recall ever getting
>> any instructions on what to do if I saw a mattress in the road.
>> I got instructions about objects in general - avoid if it's
>> possible to do so safely.
>>
>
> Honestly, I wouldn't think it's a common problem, but I've seen
> this exact scenario twice now in a relatively short period of time
> on the roads that I travel. However, the instruction I seem to
> remember was from years and years ago, but I never thought I'd
> actually need to remember it. A mattress on the road? But here
> you have it. Twice in a short period of time, not to mention all
> the mattresses I've seen on the side of the roads, also likely lost
> from the vehicle moving it.
>
> Which brings me back to my question: If you were to see something
> large and flat drop off of a truck in front of you, would you run
> over it or swerve to miss it, and maybe hit some other car? I
> still seem to remember being told you're supposed to drive over it.
> LOL Don't mind me. I ponder weird stuff like this sometimes. I'm
> just glad I missed something that happened earlier this week, since
> I was stuck in the resulting traffic jam. (salsa?) A tractor
> trailor overturned and spilled out 20,000 lbs of frozen veggies all
> over the highway.

One time in Thailand, we were stuck in traffic for a long time on the
highway just outside of Bangkok. A big truck had lost his load of fish.
The truck was still upright, but there was a mountain of fish in the
middle of the road. Workers had arrived and were shovelling the fish
back into the truck. Straight on to the market too, I bet!
--
Britta
Purring is an automatic safety valve device for dealing with happiness
overflow.
Check out pictures of Vino at:
http://photos.yahoo.com/badwilson click on the Vino album

Cheryl
August 5th 06, 04:35 AM
On Fri 04 Aug 2006 09:51:08p, Joy wrote in rec.pets.cats.anecdotes
):

> I do my best to avoid hitting or driving over anything that's
> lying in the road, and certainly something as thick as a
> mattress is a thing I'd want to avoid.
>
LOL Same here. There was a period of time where I kept hitting
things that fell off of trucks ... I ran over something that looked
like the deck of a lawn mower and I heard it bang the underneath of
my truck (my old pickup truck - Chevy S10) and other various things
that are unidentifiable in the road and you don't see until it's
too late. Not sure how I'd react if I saw a mattress fall off of a
vehicle in front of me, or if I could react fast enough.

> Incidentally, items fall off trucks a lot. In the Los Angeles
> area, one of the traffic reporters on the radio station I listen
> to is often referred to as the president of Freeway Furniture
> Company.

LOL

--
Cheryl

Cheryl
August 5th 06, 04:43 AM
On Fri 04 Aug 2006 10:19:33p, badwilson wrote in
rec.pets.cats.anecdotes ):

> One time in Thailand, we were stuck in traffic for a long time
> on the highway just outside of Bangkok. A big truck had lost
> his load of fish. The truck was still upright, but there was a
> mountain of fish in the middle of the road. Workers had arrived
> and were shovelling the fish back into the truck. Straight on
> to the market too, I bet!

That's disgusting. "So that's what they gritty tecture was". Ick.

The news reports here said that truck was one of many that turned
over that day due to the heat wave here. Tires deflate in the high
heat and should be checked every two hours, but some drivers don't
comply. I'd love to hear from Dan to understand how much harder it is
to control a big rig in the heat?

--
Cheryl

Monique Y. Mudama
August 5th 06, 05:47 AM
On 2006-08-05, Cheryl penned:
>
> Which brings me back to my question: If you were to see something
> large and flat drop off of a truck in front of you, would you run
> over it or swerve to miss it, and maybe hit some other car? I still
> seem to remember being told you're supposed to drive over it. LOL
> Don't mind me. I ponder weird stuff like this sometimes. I'm just
> glad I missed something that happened earlier this week, since I was
> stuck in the resulting traffic jam. (salsa?) A tractor trailor
> overturned and spilled out 20,000 lbs of frozen veggies all over the
> highway.

I would swerve if traffic appeared clear, otherwise drive over it.
Very little is worth the risk of hitting another moving vehicle.
Now, if we're talking telephone poles flying off the back of a
trailer or something, yes, I would swerve, because staying put would
be suicide.

I was in the situation once where something was in the road, but I
couldn't safely swerve, so I had to drive over it. It tore up the
undercarriage pretty badly.

--
monique, who spoils Oscar unmercifully

pictures: http://www.bounceswoosh.org/rpca

Susan M
August 5th 06, 05:54 AM
"Cheryl" > wrote in message
...
>
> Honestly, I wouldn't think it's a common problem, but I've seen
> this exact scenario twice now in a relatively short period of time
> on the roads that I travel. However, the instruction I seem to
> remember was from years and years ago, but I never thought I'd
> actually need to remember it. A mattress on the road? But here
> you have it. Twice in a short period of time, not to mention all
> the mattresses I've seen on the side of the roads, also likely lost
> from the vehicle moving it.

LOL - it reminds me of something from the Hitch Hikers Guide to the Galaxy -
except its a mattress instead of a couch!

Susan M
Otis and Chester

Yowie
August 5th 06, 07:26 AM
"badwilson" > wrote in message
...
> Cheryl wrote:
>> On Fri 04 Aug 2006 08:55:45p, Cheryl Perkins wrote in
>> rec.pets.cats.anecdotes ):
>>
>>> Cheryl > wrote:
>>>> All of the old driving instructions that I remember said that
>>>> if you came across a mattress on the road to drive over it. Or
>>>> am I remembering wrong? Today is the second time I've seen
>>>> this - a vehicle on the side of the road with a mattress wedged
>>>> between the tires and the wheel well.
>>>
>>> Surely this isn't a common problem? I don't recall ever getting
>>> any instructions on what to do if I saw a mattress in the road.
>>> I got instructions about objects in general - avoid if it's
>>> possible to do so safely.
>>>
>>
>> Honestly, I wouldn't think it's a common problem, but I've seen
>> this exact scenario twice now in a relatively short period of time
>> on the roads that I travel. However, the instruction I seem to
>> remember was from years and years ago, but I never thought I'd
>> actually need to remember it. A mattress on the road? But here
>> you have it. Twice in a short period of time, not to mention all
>> the mattresses I've seen on the side of the roads, also likely lost
>> from the vehicle moving it.
>>
>> Which brings me back to my question: If you were to see something
>> large and flat drop off of a truck in front of you, would you run
>> over it or swerve to miss it, and maybe hit some other car? I
>> still seem to remember being told you're supposed to drive over it.
>> LOL Don't mind me. I ponder weird stuff like this sometimes. I'm
>> just glad I missed something that happened earlier this week, since
>> I was stuck in the resulting traffic jam. (salsa?) A tractor
>> trailor overturned and spilled out 20,000 lbs of frozen veggies all
>> over the highway.
>
> One time in Thailand, we were stuck in traffic for a long time on the
> highway just outside of Bangkok. A big truck had lost his load of fish.
> The truck was still upright, but there was a mountain of fish in the
> middle of the road. Workers had arrived and were shovelling the fish back
> into the truck. Straight on to the market too, I bet!

I remember driving back tot he airport in Melbourne once, and there were
carrots all over the road, and he orange mess seemed to go on *forever*. it
was quite surreal.

Yowie

William Hamblen
August 5th 06, 09:57 AM
On 5 Aug 2006 00:51:39 GMT, Cheryl >
wrote:

>All of the old driving instructions that I remember said that if
>you came across a mattress on the road to drive over it.

Drive around. You could get a mattress stuck under the car. There
could be an open manhole underneath.

Bud
--
The night is just the shadow of the Earth.

MaryL
August 5th 06, 08:17 PM
"Cheryl" > wrote in message
...
> On Fri 04 Aug 2006 08:55:45p, Cheryl Perkins wrote in
> rec.pets.cats.anecdotes ):
>
>> Cheryl > wrote:
>>> All of the old driving instructions that I remember said that
>>> if you came across a mattress on the road to drive over it. Or
>>> am I remembering wrong? Today is the second time I've seen
>>> this - a vehicle on the side of the road with a mattress wedged
>>> between the tires and the wheel well.
>>
>> Surely this isn't a common problem? I don't recall ever getting
>> any instructions on what to do if I saw a mattress in the road.
>> I got instructions about objects in general - avoid if it's
>> possible to do so safely.
>>
>
> Honestly, I wouldn't think it's a common problem, but I've seen
> this exact scenario twice now in a relatively short period of time
> on the roads that I travel. However, the instruction I seem to
> remember was from years and years ago, but I never thought I'd
> actually need to remember it. A mattress on the road? But here
> you have it. Twice in a short period of time, not to mention all
> the mattresses I've seen on the side of the roads, also likely lost
> from the vehicle moving it.
>
> Which brings me back to my question: If you were to see something
> large and flat drop off of a truck in front of you, would you run
> over it or swerve to miss it, and maybe hit some other car? I
> still seem to remember being told you're supposed to drive over it.
> LOL Don't mind me. I ponder weird stuff like this sometimes. I'm
> just glad I missed something that happened earlier this week, since
> I was stuck in the resulting traffic jam. (salsa?) A tractor
> trailor overturned and spilled out 20,000 lbs of frozen veggies all
> over the highway.
>
> --
> Cheryl
>

I would try to run over it if my only other choice was to swerve and run
into another vehicle. Hopefully, I could come to a stop or at least slow
down significantly or drive off the side of the road if that was safe.
Running into another vehicle or running into (good chance it wouldn't really
be "over") a mattresses are both poor options, but sometimes we don't have a
"choice."

MaryL

Christina Websell
August 6th 06, 12:21 AM
"Cheryl" > wrote in message
...
> All of the old driving instructions that I remember said that if
> you came across a mattress on the road to drive over it. Or am I
> remembering wrong? Today is the second time I've seen this - a
> vehicle on the side of the road with a mattress wedged between the
> tires and the wheel well.
>
> It was a normal drive to work, and the last part of my commute is
> open highway where the majority of the traffic is heading the other
> way (wish the whole way could be like this!) so when everyone hits
> the open part, they speed up. I noticed up ahead everyone hitting
> their brakes, then when I got there, I saw a mattress in the middle
> of one of the lanes, and a metro bus actually swerved around it
> (had to be scary for the passengers!) and I thought the bus was
> going to tip over. Up ahead about 50 feet was a pickup truck
> pulled over, the driver standing outside the vehicle looking at it
> as if trying to figure out how to get the mattress out from under
> the truck. It was all lodged in the wheel well. Yeesh. From where
> the other mattress was (maybe that part was the box spring) and
> where the truck was pulled over, I can't imagine what it felt like
> to have to pull over with that underneath? Wild.
>
> --

This is so funny and weird to me. Sorry. It would not be an option here in
Britain to drive over a mattress in the road.
Mainly because there wouldn't be one! The first driver who saw something
on the road like that would stop and phone the police who would then hot
foot over and remove it within a few minutes.
It's much easier for the police to remove a potential hazard from the road
quickly than deal with the carnage that might happen if they left it there.

I haven't answered your question, have I? Okay, if I saw a mattress on the
road I would stop my car in front of it. I would not drive over it. I would
use my mobile phone to alert the police who would then come along and remove
it. In the meantime my car would be blocking that lane so no-one else could
drive over it and and in a few minutes we would all continue on our way.

Tweed

MaryL
August 6th 06, 12:27 AM
"Christina Websell" > wrote in message
...
>
> "Cheryl" > wrote in message
> ...
>> All of the old driving instructions that I remember said that if
>> you came across a mattress on the road to drive over it. Or am I
>> remembering wrong? Today is the second time I've seen this - a
>> vehicle on the side of the road with a mattress wedged between the
>> tires and the wheel well.
>>
>> It was a normal drive to work, and the last part of my commute is
>> open highway where the majority of the traffic is heading the other
>> way (wish the whole way could be like this!) so when everyone hits
>> the open part, they speed up. I noticed up ahead everyone hitting
>> their brakes, then when I got there, I saw a mattress in the middle
>> of one of the lanes, and a metro bus actually swerved around it
>> (had to be scary for the passengers!) and I thought the bus was
>> going to tip over. Up ahead about 50 feet was a pickup truck
>> pulled over, the driver standing outside the vehicle looking at it
>> as if trying to figure out how to get the mattress out from under
>> the truck. It was all lodged in the wheel well. Yeesh. From where
>> the other mattress was (maybe that part was the box spring) and
>> where the truck was pulled over, I can't imagine what it felt like
>> to have to pull over with that underneath? Wild.
>>
>> --
>
> This is so funny and weird to me. Sorry. It would not be an option here
> in Britain to drive over a mattress in the road.
> Mainly because there wouldn't be one! The first driver who saw something
> on the road like that would stop and phone the police who would then hot
> foot over and remove it within a few minutes.
> It's much easier for the police to remove a potential hazard from the road
> quickly than deal with the carnage that might happen if they left it
> there.
>
> I haven't answered your question, have I? Okay, if I saw a mattress on
> the road I would stop my car in front of it. I would not drive over it. I
> would use my mobile phone to alert the police who would then come along
> and remove it. In the meantime my car would be blocking that lane so
> no-one else could drive over it and and in a few minutes we would all
> continue on our way.
>
> Tweed
>
>
>
>

I think the real issue here is what to do if the mattress dropped onto the
road immediately in front of you -- that is, quick action is necessary, not
a mattress that has just been left lying there for some time. I doubt that
a mattress would just be "left" in the road for very long here, either, but
(depending on the area) numerous cars could come upon it before it could be
moved. Years ago, we were driving behind a pickup truck that was loaded
with all sorts of furniture and household items (but not a mattress, as I
recall). Just as we passed the truck, several items blew off onto the road
behind the truck. We were safe, but the car behind collided with a table!

MaryL

Monique Y. Mudama
August 6th 06, 04:12 AM
On 2006-08-05, MaryL penned:
>
> I would try to run over it if my only other choice was to swerve and
> run into another vehicle. Hopefully, I could come to a stop or at
> least slow down significantly or drive off the side of the road if
> that was safe. Running into another vehicle or running into (good
> chance it wouldn't really be "over") a mattresses are both poor
> options, but sometimes we don't have a "choice."

I end up driving up mountain canyons a lot for my recreational
activities. You know, the ones that say, "Caution: Falling Rock" and
it's possible, although highly unlikely, that a boulder the size of
your car could come rolling down at just the wrong time and knock you
and your car into the creek many feet below.

So I've actually spent some time trying to figure out which would be
better -- driving into a stationary boulder or swerving into oncoming
traffic. Swerving into a head-on collision with another car is almost
never the better choice when it comes to personal survival, given that
it roughly doubles the speed of impact, but I think a boulder might be
the rare exception. It really depends on the mass of the boulder, and
I don't think I'll have time for the math involved =P

I think in the final analysis, the best option would be to drive into
the boulder, because I would probably die either way, but if I swerved
I would probably kill people in the other car as well. Maybe I could
swerve into the creek far below and hope my seatbelt is particularly
effective.

Then again, if there were a big boulder in the road, I'm not sure if I
could tell if there were cars in the other lane or not. In that case
I would probably take the risk of swerving into the other lane.

Am I morbid, or what? (When walking home at night on my college
campus, I also used to keep an eye out for likely ambush spots --
places where the bushes grew very close to the walkways, that sort of
thing.)


--
monique, who spoils Oscar unmercifully

pictures: http://www.bounceswoosh.org/rpca

Monique Y. Mudama
August 6th 06, 04:14 AM
On 2006-08-05, Christina Websell penned:
>
> This is so funny and weird to me. Sorry. It would not be an option
> here in Britain to drive over a mattress in the road. Mainly
> because there wouldn't be one! The first driver who saw something
> on the road like that would stop and phone the police who would then
> hot foot over and remove it within a few minutes. It's much easier
> for the police to remove a potential hazard from the road quickly
> than deal with the carnage that might happen if they left it there.

Let's say that it takes the police 10 minutes to get to the location
and begin to remove the mattress. (Of course, depending on other
events in the area, it might take much longer than that.) It really
depends on how much traffic your area sees. Easily hundreds of cars
could encounter that mattress if it's a commonly used thoroughfare.

--
monique, who spoils Oscar unmercifully

pictures: http://www.bounceswoosh.org/rpca

Takayuki
August 6th 06, 05:56 AM
"Monique Y. Mudama" > wrote:
>So I've actually spent some time trying to figure out which would be
>better -- driving into a stationary boulder or swerving into oncoming
>traffic. Swerving into a head-on collision with another car is almost
>never the better choice when it comes to personal survival, given that
>it roughly doubles the speed of impact, but I think a boulder might be
>the rare exception. It really depends on the mass of the boulder, and
>I don't think I'll have time for the math involved =P

Back in high school, they told us that every action has an equal and
opposite reaction. I think the upshot of that would be that if you
collided at 35 mph with an immovable object, the immovable object
would effectively be hitting you back with the same force, so the end
result would be the same as hitting another car going at 35 mph, or
hitting a stationary car at 70 mph. But I may be wrong about all
that, because I'm recalling intuitions instead of equations. :)

>Am I morbid, or what? (When walking home at night on my college
>campus, I also used to keep an eye out for likely ambush spots --
>places where the bushes grew very close to the walkways, that sort of
>thing.)

I used to watch out for the same thing, because there was a theater
major who lived nearby, who would play ninja at night, popping out of
bushes and throwing rubber balls at people.

Micha
August 6th 06, 01:02 PM
On Sat, 5 Aug 2006 21:12:23 -0600, Monique Y. Mudama wrote:

>
> So I've actually spent some time trying to figure out which would be
> better -- driving into a stationary boulder or swerving into oncoming
> traffic. Swerving into a head-on collision with another car is almost
> never the better choice when it comes to personal survival,

> given that
> it roughly doubles the speed of impact,

Hi Monique, that really is not true. it is all a question of energy
transfer:

Imagine two identical cars are approaching head-on with the same
speed. And also imagine a wall between them, which is not fixed and
can be moved by both cars. Imagine now both cars collide with the wall
at exactly the same moment. Each car transfers his energy to the wall.
Since both cars carry the same energy - in opposite directions - it
will equal out - the resulting speed is zero, the wall would not move.
So each car has to absorb only his own energy and nothing from the
other car would be transferred.

When the cars are not identical, f.e. one is much bigger or much
faster, than the difference of energy would be transferred to the
other car - the impact would send the car with lesser energy
backwards.

> but I think a boulder might be
> the rare exception. It really depends on the mass of the boulder, and
> I don't think I'll have time for the math involved =P
>

If there is no other possibility and if you are driving a fairly
modern car I would take my chance in a head-on collision, either with
the boulder or with an approaching car. This is where modern cars are
designed to give you a maximum protrection with crumple zones, seat
belts and airbags.

Squarely Yours
Michael

--
Square Dance is friendship put to music
Andrea and Michael with furballs Blacky and Merlin
More detail at: http://www.curschmann-sachsen.de

MaryL
August 6th 06, 01:27 PM
"Micha" > wrote in message
...
> On Sat, 5 Aug 2006 21:12:23 -0600, Monique Y. Mudama wrote:
>
>>
>> So I've actually spent some time trying to figure out which would be
>> better -- driving into a stationary boulder or swerving into oncoming
>> traffic. Swerving into a head-on collision with another car is almost
>> never the better choice when it comes to personal survival,
>
>> given that
>> it roughly doubles the speed of impact,
>
> Hi Monique, that really is not true. it is all a question of energy
> transfer:
>
> Imagine two identical cars are approaching head-on with the same
> speed. And also imagine a wall between them, which is not fixed and
> can be moved by both cars. Imagine now both cars collide with the wall
> at exactly the same moment. Each car transfers his energy to the wall.
> Since both cars carry the same energy - in opposite directions - it
> will equal out - the resulting speed is zero, the wall would not move.
> So each car has to absorb only his own energy and nothing from the
> other car would be transferred.
>
> When the cars are not identical, f.e. one is much bigger or much
> faster, than the difference of energy would be transferred to the
> other car - the impact would send the car with lesser energy
> backwards.
>
>> but I think a boulder might be
>> the rare exception. It really depends on the mass of the boulder, and
>> I don't think I'll have time for the math involved =P
>>
>
> If there is no other possibility and if you are driving a fairly
> modern car I would take my chance in a head-on collision, either with
> the boulder or with an approaching car. This is where modern cars are
> designed to give you a maximum protrection with crumple zones, seat
> belts and airbags.
>
> Squarely Yours
> Michael
>
> --
>

In my opinion, you should *never* choose an option to deliberately run
head-on into another car (at least, not at high speed). That option means
that you are now deliberately risking the lives of other people. I am
assuming that this is a conscious decision, and not a reaction where you
didn't realize that you would hit someone else.

MaryL

Christina Websell
August 6th 06, 08:28 PM
"Monique Y. Mudama" > wrote in message
...
> On 2006-08-05, Christina Websell penned:
>>
>> This is so funny and weird to me. Sorry. It would not be an option
>> here in Britain to drive over a mattress in the road. Mainly
>> because there wouldn't be one! The first driver who saw something
>> on the road like that would stop and phone the police who would then
>> hot foot over and remove it within a few minutes. It's much easier
>> for the police to remove a potential hazard from the road quickly
>> than deal with the carnage that might happen if they left it there.
>
> Let's say that it takes the police 10 minutes to get to the location
> and begin to remove the mattress. (Of course, depending on other
> events in the area, it might take much longer than that.) It really
> depends on how much traffic your area sees. Easily hundreds of cars
> could encounter that mattress if it's a commonly used thoroughfare.

If the police were taking too long to arrive, two or three blokes in the
cars waiting in the queue it was causing would most likely get out and move
it off the road themselves.
A lot of our roads have only two lanes, one going on way and one the other.
Our cars tend to be smaller too. Any encounter with a mattress or anything
that sort of size would have serious consequences for me in my small Citreon
AX.

Tweed

Monique Y. Mudama
August 7th 06, 05:42 AM
On 2006-08-06, Christina Websell penned:
>
> If the police were taking too long to arrive, two or three blokes in the
> cars waiting in the queue it was causing would most likely get out and move
> it off the road themselves.

I guess this is a cultural thing -- I can't see traffic stopping for a
mattress.

Wait.

I do have a vague memory of *something* involving a steep, curvy
canyon road just outside of Boulder and a truck and a mattress. But I
don't remember what happened. I think the mattress may have fallen to
the side of the road and the truck screeched to a halt, but I could
have that wrong.

> A lot of our roads have only two lanes, one going on way and one the other.
> Our cars tend to be smaller too. Any encounter with a mattress or anything
> that sort of size would have serious consequences for me in my small Citreon
> AX.

I think it would be pretty bad news for any car to drive over a
mattress ... I wonder if it would slide or stay put as you drove over
it.


--
monique, who spoils Oscar unmercifully

pictures: http://www.bounceswoosh.org/rpca

Monique Y. Mudama
August 7th 06, 05:43 AM
On 2006-08-06, MaryL penned:
>
> "Micha" > wrote in message
> ...
>> If there is no other possibility and if you are driving a fairly
>> modern car I would take my chance in a head-on collision, either
>> with the boulder or with an approaching car. This is where modern
>> cars are designed to give you a maximum protrection with crumple
>> zones, seat belts and airbags.
>>
>
> In my opinion, you should *never* choose an option to deliberately
> run head-on into another car (at least, not at high speed). That
> option means that you are now deliberately risking the lives of
> other people. I am assuming that this is a conscious decision, and
> not a reaction where you didn't realize that you would hit someone
> else.

I don't think Micha meant to suggest in any way that one should drive
into another car if there's another option. He was talking about the
physics of the matter.


--
monique, who spoils Oscar unmercifully

pictures: http://www.bounceswoosh.org/rpca

MaryL
August 7th 06, 12:29 PM
"Monique Y. Mudama" > wrote in message
...
> On 2006-08-06, MaryL penned:
>>
>> "Micha" > wrote in message
>> ...
>>> If there is no other possibility and if you are driving a fairly
>>> modern car I would take my chance in a head-on collision, either
>>> with the boulder or with an approaching car. This is where modern
>>> cars are designed to give you a maximum protrection with crumple
>>> zones, seat belts and airbags.
>>>
>>
>> In my opinion, you should *never* choose an option to deliberately
>> run head-on into another car (at least, not at high speed). That
>> option means that you are now deliberately risking the lives of
>> other people. I am assuming that this is a conscious decision, and
>> not a reaction where you didn't realize that you would hit someone
>> else.
>
> I don't think Micha meant to suggest in any way that one should drive
> into another car if there's another option. He was talking about the
> physics of the matter.
>
>
> --
> monique, who spoils Oscar unmercifully
>
> pictures: http://www.bounceswoosh.org/rpca

This was the last paragraph in Michael's message (and the part of the
message that "inspired" my response): "If there is no other possibility and
if you are driving a fairly modern car I would take my chance in a head-on
collision, either with the boulder or with an approaching car. This is where
modern cars are designed to give you a maximum protrection with crumple
zones, seat belts and airbags."

I realize that this is all hypothetical. However, I remember my driver's ed
teacher saying...all those years ago...that when we are behind the wheel of
a car, we have total responsibility to put our own lives at risk in order to
save others. We are driving what could become a lethal weapon, and we have
no right to use it to save ourselves if we jeopardize someone else in so
doing. Of course, all of this also presumes that ther is enough time to at
least make *some* judgment. Many accidents happen so quickly that we are
really responding with reflex.

MaryL

Jane
August 7th 06, 04:29 PM
Cheryl Perkins wrote:
> Cheryl > wrote:
> > All of the old driving instructions that I remember said that if
> > you came across a mattress on the road to drive over it. Or am I
> > remembering wrong? Today is the second time I've seen this - a
> > vehicle on the side of the road with a mattress wedged between the
> > tires and the wheel well.
>
> Surely this isn't a common problem? I don't recall ever getting any
> instructions on what to do if I saw a mattress in the road. I got
> instructions about objects in general - avoid if it's possible to do so
> safely.
>

That's how I got into my last car accident - a truck far ahead dropped
a ladder onto the road. A whole bunch of people stopped, including me,
but the guy behind me didn't. He ran into me full-tilt, ramming me into
the truck in front of me, and ramming *that* truck into the car in
front of him!

I believe it cost him about $10,000 - $6,000 to fix my car, and $4,000
to fix me. My car was only a year old!

Jane
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