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Anonymous
August 29th 06, 07:02 AM
ARE WE READY FLORIDA AND OTHERS IN ITS PATH?
SORRY TO TYPE IN BIG LETTERS IT FOR EMPHASIS

GET YOUR AFFAIRS IN ORDER NOW!
BACK UP YOUR COMPUTERS NOW!
GET YOUR CARS FILLED WITH GAS TONIGHT
MAKE SURE YOUR PAPER WORK IS TAKEN CARE OFF. HAVE YOUR PET
INFORMATION
READY IN A WATER TIGHT CONTAINER READY TO GO IF YOU NEED TO.
GET YOUR SUPPLIES TONIGHT IF YOU NEED ANYTHING. TOMORROW THE SHOPS
WILL BE
FILLED WITH THE LAST MINUTE FOOLS.

Prior To The Storm

Listen for weather updates on local radio/television stations. Do not
pay
attention to rumors.
Organize your emergency supplies. Prepare emergency water storage by
sterilizing the bathtub, jugs, bottles, cooking utensils and
containers.
Scrub them thoroughly, sponge with bleach, rinse and let dry; fill
with
water.
Prepare emergency water supply. Figure one gallon of drinking water
per
person per day.
Clear your yard of loose objects such as bicycles, lawn furniture and
trash
cans.
Anchor objects (no matter how heavy or large) that cannot be moved
inside.
Secure your boat. Lash it to your trailer securely, let the air out of
the
trailer tires and secure the trailer to something sturdy in the
ground. If
you keep your boat in a marina, check your contract; some require that
you
move it when a hurricane watch is issued. You are responsible for your
boat.
Board windows and doors. Taping windows will not prevent them from
breaking,
but may reduce the risk of flying glass.
Close all windows.
Do not drain your pool completely; lower water level 6" to
12" to
accommodate heavy rains. Add extra chlorine to prevent contamination.
Turn
off electricity to your pool equipment and cover pool pump if exposed.
Store documents and valuables in waterproof containers and secure in
the
highest possible spot.
Turn your refrigerator and freezer to the coldest setting, opening
only when
absolutely necessary. Freeze water in plastic jugs and containers and
use
them to fill empty spaces between refrigerator contents to keep food
cool.




Lat minute ideas for all of us in the path

THE MAIN ITEMS FOOD AND TOYS FOR THE FURBALLS.

Emergency Supplies To Have At Home
Two-week supply of medicines, prescriptions
First aid supplies
Portable radio/flashlights and clock with extra batteries
Infant necessities (baby food, formula, disposable diapers)
Extra clothing, eyeglasses, etc.
Toiletries
Manual can opener
Ice chest and ice
Pillows, blankets, sleeping bags
Quiet games, books, playing cards
Tools, nails, duct tape
Important papers (valid ID)
Plenty of cash (ATMs may not work)
Fire extinguisher
Mosquito repellent
Disposable plates, glasses and utensils
Disposable washcloths and paper towels
Bleach (without lemon or any additives)
Trash bags
Water storage containers
Fuel can and fuel, sterno
Portable, battery-powered lanterns
Non-perishable Foods To Have At Home
Have sufficient amounts on hand to last your family two weeks.
Special dietary foods
Peanut butter and jelly
Powdered or shelf pack milk
Bottled water
Canned meats, fruits, vegetables, soups, puddings, milk
Dried fruit
Powdered or individually packaged drinks
Instant coffee and tea
Crackers, cereals, cookies, snacks
Condiments
*******Pet Food ********


During the Storm
An evacuation order may come from local officials and/or the governor
and
will be broadcast by zone number. Leave early to avoid traffic or
early
flooding.
Mobile homes and factory-built or pre-fabricated homes are unsafe in
hurricane conditions, no matter how firmly they may be attached to the

ground. Do not attempt to remain in them during the storm.
High-rise apartments and condos are susceptible to conditions that may
cause
fires during high winds, when it is impossible to get emergency help.
Hurricane winds are stronger at higher elevations.
Red Cross shelters are available for people who have nowhere else to
go. Do
not go to a shelter until you hear an announcement that it is open.
Have a
shelter kit packed: first aid kit, medicine, baby food and diapers,
cards
and books, toiletries, battery-operated radio, flashlight, extra
batteries,
blankets or sleeping bag, identification, valuable papers (insurance)
and
cash.
Turn off electricity, water and gas.
Unplug major appliances.
If you need to evacuate, pack emergency supplies in your vehicle and
leave
immediately on your preplanned route.

Other Expert Resources

FEMA - http://www.fema.gov/

Red Cross - http://www.redcross.org/

National Hurricane Center - http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/


After the Storm
Don't expect to return to your home immediately. Access to damaged
areas
will be controlled due to rescue and repair operations.
Avoid driving in order to leave the roads clear for emergency
vehicles.
Report any dangling electrical wires and any broken water, gas or
sewer
lines to your local utility department. Do not report individual
interruptions in power, water or phone service.
Beware of snakes, insects or other animals driven to high ground by
floodwater.
Enter your home with caution after surveying external damage.
Be careful with fire. Do not strike a match until you are certain
there are
no severed gas lines.
Operate a portable generator outside the house only.
Water supplies may be contaminated during the hurricane and the Public

Health Department may issue a boil water order for the first 72 hours
immediately following the hurricane. Use pre-stored water for drinking
or
cooking until further notice.
Listen to your local radio stations for instructions about emergency
medical, food and housing assistance.
Do not call 911 except for emergencies or life-threatening situations.

Keeping Food Safe During a Power Outage
Items in a full freezer will stay frozen for about two days with the
door
kept closed; in a half-full freezer, for about one day.
Refrigerated foods can keep for up to four hours.
Discard any perishable refrigerated foods that have been above 40F
for more
than two hours.
Discard any food with unusual odor, color or texture. Remember:
"When in
doubt, throw it out."
For additional information about food safety during power outages,
call the
toll-free USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline: 1-800-535-4555.




Hurricanes are dangerous tropical cyclones. Their winds reach a
constant
speed of at least 74 mph, but may gust up to 200 mph. Hurricanes can
cover
several hundred miles, and can generate torrential rains and
tornadoes. The
eye of the hurricane is misleadingly calm; tricking people into
thinking the
storm is over. However, when the eye passes over your area, only half
the
storm has passed; the rest is yet to come. The wind will return
suddenly
from the opposite direction, perhaps with even greater force. The most

dangerous part of a hurricane is the storm surge, which has the
greatest
potential for hurricane-related deaths. This dome of water forms in
the
middle of the hurricane as it moves over the ocean, and can reach 10
to 20
feet above normal sea level. At shoreline, this mountain of water,
aided by
huge breaking waves, acts like a bulldozer, razing everything in its
path.
It can knock down single-family homes and cause erosion under major
buildings. Heavy rains can flood low-lying areas.
For information regarding evacuation zones and emergency shelters,
tune in
to your local television and radio stations, call your local Red Cross
or
your county's Emergency Management Office.


Glossary of Terms

Storm: categorized by its circular wind intensity. Storms circulate
clockwise in the southern hemisphere and counterclockwise in the
northern.


Tropical Wave: A cluster of clouds and/or thunderstorms with little or
no
circulation* or strong wind.


Tropical Depression: An organized system of clouds and/or
thunderstorms with
some circulation at surface, highest winds less than 39 mph.


Tropical Storm: An organized system of strong thunderstorms with
stronger
circulation; highest wind speed 39-73 mph. These storms can quickly
accelerate when they reach tropical storm strength and become
hurricanes.
Storms are named when they reach tropical storm strength.


Tropical Storm Watch: Tropical storm conditions, including winds of
39-73
mph, pose a possible threat to the area within 36 hours.


Tropical Storm Warning: Tropical storm conditions are expected within
24
hours.


Hurricane: Very strong, pronounced circulation; winds of 74 mph or
more.


Hurricane Watch: Hurricane conditions are a real possibility for the
area
usually within 36 hours.


Hurricane Warning: Hurricane conditions are expected within 24 hours.


Hurricane Season Dates
The six-month period from June 1 to November 30 is considered the
Atlantic
Hurricane Season.
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