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Richard Evans
August 30th 06, 08:31 PM
How much do you tell a prospective adopter about a cat's quirks?

I feel a certain obligation to give an adopter an accurate profile of
a cat's personality, including any quirks, which most cats have.
Unfortunately, such revelation can skewer an adoption.

People seem to want generic kitties, all cute and cuddly all the time.
Very few fit that bill.

I've just taken in another foster that poses a dilemma.

She's a tiny orange tabby, sweet as she can be... up to a point. She
will get up on your lap, all lovey with head butts and kisses, then at
some arbitrary point she hisses and jumps away.

To me, this is just a personalty quirk, but to prospective adopters it
may be a deal killer.

How honest should I be?

John Ross Mc Master
August 30th 06, 08:36 PM
On Wed, 30 Aug 2006 15:31:49 -0400, Richard Evans
> wrote:

>How much do you tell a prospective adopter about a cat's quirks?
>
>I feel a certain obligation to give an adopter an accurate profile of
>a cat's personality, including any quirks, which most cats have.
>Unfortunately, such revelation can skewer an adoption.
>
>People seem to want generic kitties, all cute and cuddly all the time.
>Very few fit that bill.
>
>I've just taken in another foster that poses a dilemma.
>
>She's a tiny orange tabby, sweet as she can be... up to a point. She
>will get up on your lap, all lovey with head butts and kisses, then at
>some arbitrary point she hisses and jumps away.
>
>To me, this is just a personalty quirk, but to prospective adopters it
>may be a deal killer.
>
>How honest should I be?


Tiny tabby?
Say the orange tabby was separated from its mother at too young an
age, no fault of yours. Say that she needs a loving family who will
put up with her occasional hisses, but she is generally a loving
kitten.

Matthew
August 30th 06, 08:42 PM
Richard this quirk may be your fault :) some cats get over stimulated when
being petted this can come in the form of aggressive play, biting and
hissing. I would tell them the truth about the quirk and how it comes
about. So just in case the furball does not go to far in the over
stimulation and end up coming back or end up in a shelter

One of my cats is the most loving cats but when he is does not want to be
continued being petted he gets aggressive and will bite after he will run
away.

IMO this is what your cat is doing the hiss is just like hey enough is
enough I am done and walks away

Good luck in the adoption

"Richard Evans" > wrote in message
...
> How much do you tell a prospective adopter about a cat's quirks?
>
> I feel a certain obligation to give an adopter an accurate profile of
> a cat's personality, including any quirks, which most cats have.
> Unfortunately, such revelation can skewer an adoption.
>
> People seem to want generic kitties, all cute and cuddly all the time.
> Very few fit that bill.
>
> I've just taken in another foster that poses a dilemma.
>
> She's a tiny orange tabby, sweet as she can be... up to a point. She
> will get up on your lap, all lovey with head butts and kisses, then at
> some arbitrary point she hisses and jumps away.
>
> To me, this is just a personalty quirk, but to prospective adopters it
> may be a deal killer.
>
> How honest should I be?

Richard Evans
August 30th 06, 08:59 PM
John Ross Mc Master > wrote:

>
>
>Tiny tabby?
>Say the orange tabby was separated from its mother at too young an
>age,

No way of knoiwing. She came to us as an adult, albeit a very small
one.

Richard Evans
August 30th 06, 09:03 PM
"Matthew" > wrote:

>Richard this quirk may be your fault :) some cats get over stimulated when
>being petted this can come in the form of aggressive play, biting and
>hissing.

I thought of that, but the result is the same, even if I don't touch
her. She gets up on my lap, I never lay a hand on her, and the results
are the same.

Anyway, I'm not so much interested in identifying why this one
particular cat is quirky, I'm asking the larger question of how much
to reveal about such quirks.

John Ross Mc Master
August 30th 06, 10:51 PM
On Wed, 30 Aug 2006 16:03:53 -0400, Richard Evans
> wrote:

>"Matthew" > wrote:
>
>>Richard this quirk may be your fault :) some cats get over stimulated when
>>being petted this can come in the form of aggressive play, biting and
>>hissing.
>
>I thought of that, but the result is the same, even if I don't touch
>her. She gets up on my lap, I never lay a hand on her, and the results
>are the same.
>
>Anyway, I'm not so much interested in identifying why this one
>particular cat is quirky, I'm asking the larger question of how much
>to reveal about such quirks.
>

I recently fostered a psycho kitten. I told all and she still got
adopted. By a tough family. Tell all, that way no one can come back to
you and accuse you of withholding info.

Anonymous
August 31st 06, 07:02 AM
On Wed, 30 Aug 2006 16:03:53 -0400, Richard Evans
<infodex> wrote:

> "Matthew" <Iamacatslave> wrote:
>
> Richard this quirk may be your fault :) some cats get over
stimulated when
> being petted this can come in the form of aggressive play, biting
and
> hissing.
>
> I thought of that, but the result is the same, even if I don't touch
> her. She gets up on my lap, I never lay a hand on her, and the
results
> are the same.
>
> Anyway, I'm not so much interested in identifying why this one
> particular cat is quirky, I'm asking the larger question of how much
> to reveal about such quirks.
>
>
I recently fostered a psycho kitten. I told all and she still got
adopted. By a tough family. Tell all, that way no one can come back to
you and accuse you of withholding info.
Sent via http://Pets-99.com , http://AnimalForum.ws & http://AnimalBlog.org

Anonymous
August 31st 06, 07:02 AM
On Wed, 30 Aug 2006 16:03:53 -0400, Richard Evans
<infodex> wrote:

> "Matthew" <Iamacatslave> wrote:
>
> Richard this quirk may be your fault :) some cats get over
stimulated when
> being petted this can come in the form of aggressive play, biting
and
> hissing.
>
> I thought of that, but the result is the same, even if I don't touch
> her. She gets up on my lap, I never lay a hand on her, and the
results
> are the same.
>
> Anyway, I'm not so much interested in identifying why this one
> particular cat is quirky, I'm asking the larger question of how much
> to reveal about such quirks.
>
>
I recently fostered a psycho kitten. I told all and she still got
adopted. By a tough family. Tell all, that way no one can come back to
you and accuse you of withholding info.
Sent via http://Pets-99.com , http://AnimalForum.ws & http://AnimalBlog.org

Anonymous
August 31st 06, 07:02 AM
On Wed, 30 Aug 2006 16:03:53 -0400, Richard Evans
<infodex> wrote:

> "Matthew" <Iamacatslave> wrote:
>
> Richard this quirk may be your fault :) some cats get over
stimulated when
> being petted this can come in the form of aggressive play, biting
and
> hissing.
>
> I thought of that, but the result is the same, even if I don't touch
> her. She gets up on my lap, I never lay a hand on her, and the
results
> are the same.
>
> Anyway, I'm not so much interested in identifying why this one
> particular cat is quirky, I'm asking the larger question of how much
> to reveal about such quirks.
>
>
I recently fostered a psycho kitten. I told all and she still got
adopted. By a tough family. Tell all, that way no one can come back to
you and accuse you of withholding info.
Sent via http://Pets-99.com , http://AnimalForum.ws & http://AnimalBlog.org

Wendy
September 6th 06, 01:22 PM
"Richard Evans" > wrote in message
...
> How much do you tell a prospective adopter about a cat's quirks?
>
> I feel a certain obligation to give an adopter an accurate profile of
> a cat's personality, including any quirks, which most cats have.
> Unfortunately, such revelation can skewer an adoption.
>
> People seem to want generic kitties, all cute and cuddly all the time.
> Very few fit that bill.
>
> I've just taken in another foster that poses a dilemma.
>
> She's a tiny orange tabby, sweet as she can be... up to a point. She
> will get up on your lap, all lovey with head butts and kisses, then at
> some arbitrary point she hisses and jumps away.
>
> To me, this is just a personalty quirk, but to prospective adopters it
> may be a deal killer.
>
> How honest should I be?

I believe in being completely honest. You're more likely to find the cat a
home where it will stay for it's lifetime if the adopters know what they are
getting. We managed to find a home for a kitty who still can't be picked up
easily. She loves to be pet but you have to sneak up on her and scruff her
to pick her up. The woman who adopted her knew all her quirks and was good
with them. Last I heard that kitty is doing great in her new home.


W