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Anne
September 4th 06, 10:58 PM
I had to take my 3 kitties out the farm, they have always been indoor
cats. It has been 1 week and they are still terrified of everything.
There are no other animals that can approach them, just the wild barn
kitties, but they can hear dogs, goats and pigs. Has anyone been in
this situation and how long did it take for the cats to adjust? They
are about 4 years old.

cybercat
September 4th 06, 11:16 PM
"Anne" > wrote in message
oups.com...
> I had to take my 3 kitties out the farm, they have always been indoor
> cats.

Why did you "have to" take them to the farm? This is a really cruel thing
to do to four-year-old indoor cats. Their fear alone should tell you that.



--
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com

Anne
September 4th 06, 11:25 PM
I had to move on short notice due medical reasons. I didn't want just
anyone to have them and they all 3 are littermates, I did not want them
seperated. My family member owns the farm.
cybercat wrote:
> "Anne" > wrote in message
> oups.com...
> > I had to take my 3 kitties out the farm, they have always been indoor
> > cats.
>
> Why did you "have to" take them to the farm? This is a really cruel thing
> to do to four-year-old indoor cats. Their fear alone should tell you that.
>
>
>
> --
> Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com

September 4th 06, 11:32 PM
In article . com>,
"Anne" > wrote:

> I had to take my 3 kitties out the farm, they have always been indoor
> cats. It has been 1 week and they are still terrified of everything.
> There are no other animals that can approach them, just the wild barn
> kitties, but they can hear dogs, goats and pigs. Has anyone been in
> this situation and how long did it take for the cats to adjust? They
> are about 4 years old.

We relocated to a farm from an urban area with our five cats. We keep
everyone inside, but they have lots of windows for their viewing
pleasure. Once over the trauma of the actual move, the cats were
exploring their new surroundings within a couple of weeks.

All of our cats are rescues, with one still being fairly feral after 3
years with us. Their ages are 16, 8, 4 and two unknown. Of the two
unknown, one is probably a little old lady (she has a heart condition)
and the other is probably about 5 or 6.

Are you keeping your cats inside or letting them roam?

Matthew
September 4th 06, 11:32 PM
"Anne" > wrote in message
ups.com...
>I had to move on short notice due medical reasons. I didn't want just
> anyone to have them and they all 3 are littermates, I did not want them
> seperated. My family member owns the farm.
> cybercat wrote:
>> "Anne" > wrote in message
>> oups.com...
>> > I had to take my 3 kitties out the farm, they have always been indoor
>> > cats.
>>
>> Why did you "have to" take them to the farm? This is a really cruel thing
>> to do to four-year-old indoor cats. Their fear alone should tell you
>> that.


Please tell me they have all their vaccination plus being spay/neutered
also.

It is going to take a while for them to adjust if they adjust at all. Is it
possible to keep them inside?

Are you sure about no predators in the area?

Plus if the other cats except them into the area. Most barn cats are feral
and feral can be pretty tough about accepting new members in to their pack

John Ross Mc Master
September 4th 06, 11:33 PM
On 4 Sep 2006 14:58:57 -0700, "Anne" > wrote:

>I had to take my 3 kitties out the farm, they have always been indoor
>cats. It has been 1 week and they are still terrified of everything.
>There are no other animals that can approach them, just the wild barn
>kitties, but they can hear dogs, goats and pigs. Has anyone been in
>this situation and how long did it take for the cats to adjust? They
>are about 4 years old.


Why can't you keep them inside? They've been inside all their lives.

cybercat
September 4th 06, 11:43 PM
"Anne" > wrote in message
ups.com...
> I had to move on short notice due medical reasons. I didn't want just
> anyone to have them and they all 3 are littermates, I did not want them
> seperated. My family member owns the farm.

I see. That must have been hard on you. Does your family member
object to indoor pets?


> cybercat wrote:
> > "Anne" > wrote in message
> > oups.com...
> > > I had to take my 3 kitties out the farm, they have always been indoor
> > > cats.
> >
> > Why did you "have to" take them to the farm? This is a really cruel
thing
> > to do to four-year-old indoor cats. Their fear alone should tell you
that.
> >
> >
> >
> > --
> > Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com
>



--
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com

Anne
September 4th 06, 11:57 PM
Yes, they object to indoor cats. They are currently penned up in a
space about 24 feet x 10 feet. Partially in the barn for shelter and
then the other 1/2 for sun with no roof.
cybercat wrote:
> "Anne" > wrote in message
> ups.com...
> > I had to move on short notice due medical reasons. I didn't want just
> > anyone to have them and they all 3 are littermates, I did not want them
> > seperated. My family member owns the farm.
>
> I see. That must have been hard on you. Does your family member
> object to indoor pets?
>
>
> > cybercat wrote:
> > > "Anne" > wrote in message
> > > oups.com...
> > > > I had to take my 3 kitties out the farm, they have always been indoor
> > > > cats.
> > >
> > > Why did you "have to" take them to the farm? This is a really cruel
> thing
> > > to do to four-year-old indoor cats. Their fear alone should tell you
> that.
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > > --
> > > Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com
> >
>
>
>
> --
> Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com

Anne
September 4th 06, 11:58 PM
I am thinking of having my relative open the pen door to let them start
wandering if they want. I think it might make them happier.
wrote:
> In article . com>,
> "Anne" > wrote:
>
> > I had to take my 3 kitties out the farm, they have always been indoor
> > cats. It has been 1 week and they are still terrified of everything.
> > There are no other animals that can approach them, just the wild barn
> > kitties, but they can hear dogs, goats and pigs. Has anyone been in
> > this situation and how long did it take for the cats to adjust? They
> > are about 4 years old.
>
> We relocated to a farm from an urban area with our five cats. We keep
> everyone inside, but they have lots of windows for their viewing
> pleasure. Once over the trauma of the actual move, the cats were
> exploring their new surroundings within a couple of weeks.
>
> All of our cats are rescues, with one still being fairly feral after 3
> years with us. Their ages are 16, 8, 4 and two unknown. Of the two
> unknown, one is probably a little old lady (she has a heart condition)
> and the other is probably about 5 or 6.
>
> Are you keeping your cats inside or letting them roam?

Anne
September 5th 06, 12:03 AM
My family member doesn't believe in indoor pets.
John Ross Mc Master wrote:
> On 4 Sep 2006 14:58:57 -0700, "Anne" > wrote:
>
> >I had to take my 3 kitties out the farm, they have always been indoor
> >cats. It has been 1 week and they are still terrified of everything.
> >There are no other animals that can approach them, just the wild barn
> >kitties, but they can hear dogs, goats and pigs. Has anyone been in
> >this situation and how long did it take for the cats to adjust? They
> >are about 4 years old.
>
>
> Why can't you keep them inside? They've been inside all their lives.

cybercat
September 5th 06, 12:12 AM
"Anne" > wrote in message
ups.com...
> Yes, they object to indoor cats. They are currently penned up in a
> space about 24 feet x 10 feet. Partially in the barn for shelter and
> then the other 1/2 for sun with no roof.

Oh, Anne, I am so sorry. This is terrible for your cats, and for you.
I don't know that they will ever adjust.



> cybercat wrote:
> > "Anne" > wrote in message
> > ups.com...
> > > I had to move on short notice due medical reasons. I didn't want just
> > > anyone to have them and they all 3 are littermates, I did not want
them
> > > seperated. My family member owns the farm.
> >
> > I see. That must have been hard on you. Does your family member
> > object to indoor pets?
> >
> >
> > > cybercat wrote:
> > > > "Anne" > wrote in message
> > > > oups.com...
> > > > > I had to take my 3 kitties out the farm, they have always been
indoor
> > > > > cats.
> > > >
> > > > Why did you "have to" take them to the farm? This is a really cruel
> > thing
> > > > to do to four-year-old indoor cats. Their fear alone should tell you
> > that.
> > > >
> > > >
> > > >
> > > > --
> > > > Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com
> > >
> >
> >
> >
> > --
> > Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com
>

cybercat
September 5th 06, 12:13 AM
"Anne" > wrote in message
ups.com...
> I am thinking of having my relative open the pen door to let them start
> wandering if they want. I think it might make them happier.

They will turn up dead, Anne. They don't know how to defend themselves. Are
you so sick you cannot even go outside? So that your cats, now put outside
after a lifetime indoors, cannot even see you?

Gail
September 5th 06, 12:18 AM
KEEP THEM INSIDE. THEY WILL BE HAPPIER AND HEALTHIER.OUTSIDE THEY WILL NOT
LIVE VERY LONG.
Gail
"Anne" > wrote in message
oups.com...
>I had to take my 3 kitties out the farm, they have always been indoor
> cats. It has been 1 week and they are still terrified of everything.
> There are no other animals that can approach them, just the wild barn
> kitties, but they can hear dogs, goats and pigs. Has anyone been in
> this situation and how long did it take for the cats to adjust? They
> are about 4 years old.
>

sosessyithurts
September 5th 06, 12:21 AM
Anne wrote:
> I had to take my 3 kitties out the farm, they have always been indoor
> cats. It has been 1 week and they are still terrified of everything.
> There are no other animals that can approach them, just the wild barn
> kitties, but they can hear dogs, goats and pigs. Has anyone been in
> this situation and how long did it take for the cats to adjust? They
> are about 4 years old.

If I was a home bound cat, I feel like I would luv to live on a farm

Remember charlotte's web?


New smells, new friends, new adventures...

I mean, in practice there is no danger right?

so they will quickly coime to love it!

will they be outdoor cats from now on?

Eva Quesnell
September 5th 06, 12:23 AM
On Mon, 4 Sep 2006, Anne wrote:

> My family member doesn't believe in indoor pets.

That's very sad, I think. It won't be easy on them at all. If this
person just lets them loose, they might just disappear. They won't know
what to do. Oh my!

You may do better trying to find an indoor home for them where they would
only have to adjust to a new person rather than an entirely different way
of life. IMO, you should rethink this one. I realize you want somebody
in the family to have them, but I think you chose the wrong person.

Eva

cybercat
September 5th 06, 12:57 AM
"sosessyithurts" > wrote :
>
> I mean, in practice there is no danger right?
>

??

Farm animals have all sorts of predators, plus barn cats
and roaming dogs are a threat. Cars passing, rat poison,
plus it looks like Anne lives in NJ, and winter is coming.

I think there is danger.

I wish it could be like Charlotte's Web, though.

Anne
September 5th 06, 01:10 AM
Your response was the one I was looking for. I hope you are right. They
do not have a way to get to a road, the dogs and other animals cannot
access them. They could cross over into the dog's territory though, but
I think they are smarter than that. I do not live in NJ. How on earth
did someone come up with that? Oh, and, yes they will be outdoor cats
from now on. It is not a dangerous farm, they're are no wolves or
anything, the cats would have a long journey to get to any harm. I
would think they would be too lazy to hike when they know my relative
will feed them every morning and the barn cats live there too.
sosessyithurts wrote:
> Anne wrote:
> > I had to take my 3 kitties out the farm, they have always been indoor
> > cats. It has been 1 week and they are still terrified of everything.
> > There are no other animals that can approach them, just the wild barn
> > kitties, but they can hear dogs, goats and pigs. Has anyone been in
> > this situation and how long did it take for the cats to adjust? They
> > are about 4 years old.
>
> If I was a home bound cat, I feel like I would luv to live on a farm
>
> Remember charlotte's web?
>
>
> New smells, new friends, new adventures...
>
> I mean, in practice there is no danger right?
>
> so they will quickly coime to love it!
>
> will they be outdoor cats from now on?

cybercat
September 5th 06, 01:21 AM
"Anne" > wrote in message
oups.com...
> Your response was the one I was looking for.

Well then, I guess you are happy.

Good for you, for asking the hard questions, and accepting the
answers you want to hear.

(Your IP resolves to New Jersey.)




--
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com

Gail
September 5th 06, 01:23 AM
I feel sorry for your cats.
Gail
"Eva Quesnell" > wrote in message
...
> On Mon, 4 Sep 2006, Anne wrote:
>
>> My family member doesn't believe in indoor pets.
>
> That's very sad, I think. It won't be easy on them at all. If this
> person just lets them loose, they might just disappear. They won't know
> what to do. Oh my!
>
> You may do better trying to find an indoor home for them where they would
> only have to adjust to a new person rather than an entirely different way
> of life. IMO, you should rethink this one. I realize you want somebody
> in the family to have them, but I think you chose the wrong person.
>
> Eva

cybercat
September 5th 06, 02:07 AM
"Anne" > wrote in message
oups.com...
> Your response was the one I was looking for. I hope you are right. They
> do not have a way to get to a road, the dogs and other animals cannot
> access them. They could cross over into the dog's territory though, but
> I think they are smarter than that. I do not live in NJ. How on earth
> did someone come up with that? Oh, and, yes they will be outdoor cats
> from now on. It is not a dangerous farm, they're are no wolves or
> anything, the cats would have a long journey to get to any harm. I
> would think they would be too lazy to hike when they know my relative
> will feed them every morning and the barn cats live there too.

Anne. I want your cats to be okay, and the farm to be an ideal haven
for them. But if they were my cats, I would want to do everything I could
to make sure they are safe, not just get people to tell me that they will be
fine. It is good that they are young, as they are still agile and fast--but
you know as well as I do that there are dangers outside that they never
dreamed of, living inside all their lives. It is admirable that you kept
them
and did not want them to be separated. I hope they are okay, and I hope
your "relative" gets what he/she deserves for being so cold-hearted that
you are not allowed to live with your cats, when you are ill. Please keep
us posted, let us know how they are doing.

Ryan Robbins
September 5th 06, 04:08 AM
"Anne" > wrote in message
oups.com...
> Your response was the one I was looking for. I hope you are right. They
> do not have a way to get to a road, the dogs and other animals cannot
> access them. They could cross over into the dog's territory though, but
> I think they are smarter than that.

Instinct overrides intelligence when it comes to cats and other animals.

>Oh, and, yes they will be outdoor cats
> from now on. It is not a dangerous farm, they're are no wolves or
> anything, the cats would have a long journey to get to any harm.

Farms are dangerous. You have machinery, animals, etc.

September 5th 06, 04:15 AM
In article om>,
"Anne" > wrote:

> I am thinking of having my relative open the pen door to let them start
> wandering if they want. I think it might make them happier.

FYI, we have been on our farm for over a year now.

The indigenous barn cats we care for have a very high turnover rate, by
which I mean they die (or at least disappear) quickly. The incidence of
FeLV is so significant, we bleach all feeding dishes every day.
Predators, from snakes to eagles, lurk everywhere in this rural area
(Wisconsin), and individual barn cats vanish overnight without
explanation.

It is heartbreaking because they are wonderful, engaging animals. Of the
all barn cats who lived here when we first arrived, only one is left.
And he looks pretty sick. I have pictures of the ones we got to know who
died and I miss them every single day. To see one of the special ones, I
will post her picture on <news:alt.binaries.pictures.animals> under the
subject: line, "Slutty" (we called her that because she was the first
female we saw go into heat here).

The winters are dreadful and cruel to domestic cats. I hear coyotes
calling almost every night, and the raptor birds around here are easily
large enough to snatch a 6-pound cat away.

Also, when moving cats, if you MUST allow them to roam in their new
location, you should keep them confined for at least six weeks before
letting them out. This will give them time to acclimate to their new
surroundings, reducing the chance that they will get lost or disappear.
Even so, you should know that your odds of losing a cat after moving are
very high if you let them out at all. I have seen it happen time and
again in my work. It is never pretty.

I am sorry for your situation, but these are the realities. I hope it
works out differently for you. Please do whatever you can to keep them
safely confined for as long as possible. Both for your sake and theirs.

Buddy's Mom
September 5th 06, 01:04 PM
You are deceiving yourself. There is no such thing as a "safe" farm
for indoor cats. Like others have said, there are dogs, ferel cats and
also coyote - just for starters. Please take them to a shelter - they
would be better off there than where you have them.

Anne wrote:
> I had to take my 3 kitties out the farm, they have always been indoor
> cats. It has been 1 week and they are still terrified of everything.
> There are no other animals that can approach them, just the wild barn
> kitties, but they can hear dogs, goats and pigs. Has anyone been in
> this situation and how long did it take for the cats to adjust? They
> are about 4 years old.

Spot
September 5th 06, 01:32 PM
Oh jezzzzzzzus talk about and idiot.

Maybe you have to move but you could have found a better solution than
dumping indoors cat out on a farm someplace. They will be dead inside of a
year.


"Anne" > wrote in message
oups.com...
> Your response was the one I was looking for. I hope you are right. They
> do not have a way to get to a road, the dogs and other animals cannot
> access them. They could cross over into the dog's territory though, but
> I think they are smarter than that. I do not live in NJ. How on earth
> did someone come up with that? Oh, and, yes they will be outdoor cats
> from now on. It is not a dangerous farm, they're are no wolves or
> anything, the cats would have a long journey to get to any harm. I
> would think they would be too lazy to hike when they know my relative
> will feed them every morning and the barn cats live there too.
> sosessyithurts wrote:
>> Anne wrote:
>> > I had to take my 3 kitties out the farm, they have always been indoor
>> > cats. It has been 1 week and they are still terrified of everything.
>> > There are no other animals that can approach them, just the wild barn
>> > kitties, but they can hear dogs, goats and pigs. Has anyone been in
>> > this situation and how long did it take for the cats to adjust? They
>> > are about 4 years old.
>>
>> If I was a home bound cat, I feel like I would luv to live on a farm
>>
>> Remember charlotte's web?
>>
>>
>> New smells, new friends, new adventures...
>>
>> I mean, in practice there is no danger right?
>>
>> so they will quickly coime to love it!
>>
>> will they be outdoor cats from now on?
>

sosessyithurts
September 5th 06, 02:33 PM
Anne wrote:
> It is not a dangerous farm, they're are no wolves or
> anything, the cats would have a long journey to get to any harm.

That is good news.

> would think they would be too lazy to hike when they know my relative
> will feed them every morning and the barn cats live there too.

lol

They'll be fine Anne, it's pointless for anyone to speculate just how
things will go.

I don't know the circumstances that led up to this move

but.. if you had taken them to a shelter, that would have crushed their
hearts.

Maybe you can go visit from time to time, I know you miss them already.

As a man who has known dissapointments not a few, having to accept hard
facts that some folk would have just as soon blown their brains out
than assimilate; your cats will be fine. In other words, when you say
you HAD to take them there, I understand that part. It doesn't mean you
liked doing it. I bet it made you cry.

In life, change is certain. We may as well accept that fact. Nobody is
exempt and somtimes we are just faced with difficult decisions. If I
was a cat I would rather goto a farm ANY DAY than to a harsh spirit
breaking shetler cage. That's nothing bad about a shelter, we need
more shelters and more money for them, if I ever hit the lottery I
would probably open my own shelter, with neutering facilities and all!

AND best wishes to your new situation, lol, how is ANNE adjusting...
LOL

When change occurs, my idea is to get on with the change, not woller in
the past or sit and mull over my dissapointment (if that is where i
find myself).

Gail Futoran
September 5th 06, 02:44 PM
"Anne" > wrote in message
oups.com...
> Your response was the one I was looking for. I hope you are right. They
> do not have a way to get to a road, the dogs and other animals cannot
> access them. They could cross over into the dog's territory though, but
> I think they are smarter than that. I do not live in NJ. How on earth
> did someone come up with that? Oh, and, yes they will be outdoor cats
> from now on. It is not a dangerous farm, they're are no wolves or
> anything, the cats would have a long journey to get to any harm. I
> would think they would be too lazy to hike when they know my relative
> will feed them every morning and the barn cats live there too.

For what it's worth: My first two cats were strictly indoor apartment cats
for the first seven (7) years of their lives. Then I got married, moved to
Tucson and a house, and let them roam outside. It didn't take them long to
adjust, and I made sure they were in every night. No, I wouldn't (and
don't) do that now, but when I grew up it was common for cats to be
indoor-outdoor pets. Two years later we moved to TX and again I let them
roam during the day. Both houses were in suburbs, where there are dangers -
cars, dogs, cat haters. (Note: Both cats eventually died of CRF at 18
years of age.)

The point is you seem to be making the best of a bad situation. If your cats
have a safe place they can run to if they are frightened, perhaps they will
do fine.

Good luck.

Gail F.
Owned by Lao Ma, Ephiny, Minya, Melosa

sosessyithurts
September 5th 06, 02:47 PM
Spot wrote:
> Oh jezzzzzzzus talk about and idiot.
>
> Maybe you have to move but you could have found a better solution than
> dumping indoors cat out on a farm someplace. They will be dead inside of a
> year.

That's just brilliant Spot

Lets dump you on a farm, you would probably get on your hands and knees
and suck an ol cow tit to get milk.

You'd prolly stick your finger up a chickens ass looking for an egg

A woman in Volusia County, Fla., has three months to get rid of nearly
170 cats living at her home after a request to keep them was denied,
according to a Local 6 News report.

Keep Manhattan, give me the countryside

Anne
September 5th 06, 07:03 PM
Thanks for your kind words, sosessyithurts. The gate to the pen was
opened this morning. Hopefully they wil be okay.
sosessyithurts wrote:
> Anne wrote:
> > It is not a dangerous farm, they're are no wolves or
> > anything, the cats would have a long journey to get to any harm.
>
> That is good news.
>
> > would think they would be too lazy to hike when they know my relative
> > will feed them every morning and the barn cats live there too.
>
> lol
>
> They'll be fine Anne, it's pointless for anyone to speculate just how
> things will go.
>
> I don't know the circumstances that led up to this move
>
> but.. if you had taken them to a shelter, that would have crushed their
> hearts.
>
> Maybe you can go visit from time to time, I know you miss them already.
>
> As a man who has known dissapointments not a few, having to accept hard
> facts that some folk would have just as soon blown their brains out
> than assimilate; your cats will be fine. In other words, when you say
> you HAD to take them there, I understand that part. It doesn't mean you
> liked doing it. I bet it made you cry.
>
> In life, change is certain. We may as well accept that fact. Nobody is
> exempt and somtimes we are just faced with difficult decisions. If I
> was a cat I would rather goto a farm ANY DAY than to a harsh spirit
> breaking shetler cage. That's nothing bad about a shelter, we need
> more shelters and more money for them, if I ever hit the lottery I
> would probably open my own shelter, with neutering facilities and all!
>
> AND best wishes to your new situation, lol, how is ANNE adjusting...
> LOL
>
> When change occurs, my idea is to get on with the change, not woller in
> the past or sit and mull over my dissapointment (if that is where i
> find myself).

Ryan Robbins
September 5th 06, 07:38 PM
"sosessyithurts" > wrote in message
ups.com...
>
> Anne wrote:
>> It is not a dangerous farm, they're are no wolves or
>> anything, the cats would have a long journey to get to any harm.
>
> That is good news.
>
>> would think they would be too lazy to hike when they know my relative
>> will feed them every morning and the barn cats live there too.
>
> lol
>
> They'll be fine Anne, it's pointless for anyone to speculate just how
> things will go.

Yet you're speculating that things will be fine.

Anne
September 5th 06, 08:06 PM
Well, the door the the pen was opened this morning. Hopefully they will
venture out and get familiar with the new surroundings. I feel terrible
for doing this, but here in our city, they would be euthanized the
shelters are overflowing with cats.
Buddy's Mom wrote:
> You are deceiving yourself. There is no such thing as a "safe" farm
> for indoor cats. Like others have said, there are dogs, ferel cats and
> also coyote - just for starters. Please take them to a shelter - they
> would be better off there than where you have them.
>
> Anne wrote:
> > I had to take my 3 kitties out the farm, they have always been indoor
> > cats. It has been 1 week and they are still terrified of everything.
> > There are no other animals that can approach them, just the wild barn
> > kitties, but they can hear dogs, goats and pigs. Has anyone been in
> > this situation and how long did it take for the cats to adjust? They
> > are about 4 years old.

Spot
September 6th 06, 02:23 AM
Well you are right up there on the idiot list with her if you think they
will be OK.

There are a hell of a lot of dangers on a farm anywhere from farm equipment
to getting attacked by a dog, coyote or fox. And I know a hell of alot more
about farm life than you do. At least I have enough common sense not to do
something like this to house pets.

Celeste

"sosessyithurts" > wrote in message
oups.com...
>
> Spot wrote:
>> Oh jezzzzzzzus talk about and idiot.
>>
>> Maybe you have to move but you could have found a better solution than
>> dumping indoors cat out on a farm someplace. They will be dead inside of
>> a
>> year.
>
> That's just brilliant Spot
>
> Lets dump you on a farm, you would probably get on your hands and knees
> and suck an ol cow tit to get milk.
>
> You'd prolly stick your finger up a chickens ass looking for an egg
>
> A woman in Volusia County, Fla., has three months to get rid of nearly
> 170 cats living at her home after a request to keep them was denied,
> according to a Local 6 News report.
>
> Keep Manhattan, give me the countryside
>

September 6th 06, 04:06 PM
Anne wrote:
> Well, the door the the pen was opened this morning. Hopefully they will
> venture out and get familiar with the new surroundings. I feel terrible
> for doing this, but here in our city, they would be euthanized the
> shelters are overflowing with cats.
> Buddy's Mom wrote:
> > You are deceiving yourself. There is no such thing as a "safe" farm
> > for indoor cats. Like others have said, there are dogs, ferel cats and
> > also coyote - just for starters. Please take them to a shelter - they
> > would be better off there than where you have them.
> >
> > Anne wrote:
> > > I had to take my 3 kitties out the farm, they have always been indoor
> > > cats. It has been 1 week and they are still terrified of everything.
> > > There are no other animals that can approach them, just the wild barn
> > > kitties, but they can hear dogs, goats and pigs. Has anyone been in
> > > this situation and how long did it take for the cats to adjust? They
> > > are about 4 years old.

Anne, they *will* eventuall adjust. Cats are adaptable. It is not in
their favor, though, that they're house cats and don't have any "street
smarts." Being fearful actually increases their chances of survival in
the meantime, though. Cats who are too bold around livestock end up
getting stepped on. These may not apply to their barn, but here are a
couple of suggestions: Be sure they are provided fresh water. Cats will
try to drink out of stock tanks if they don't have water, and can drown
in the metal ones if the water level is low. It will help tremendously
if the owners can lock them up in a tackroom or something at night.
Predators mostly come out at night, and even a raccoon will on occasion
tangle with the cats. Make sure the owner isn't currently leaving
poison out for rats/mice.

I know some of this may not apply, but it's all I can think of right
now. I keep cats in the barn; they're feral cats that were trapped and
brought to the humane society. Being a barn cat is a great life for
them, better than they would ever have. With your former house cats,
it's different, and it's too bad you could not find a gig for them as a
house cat. But even so, with some TLC and caution, I do think they'll
adjust.

Sherry

sosessyithurts
September 6th 06, 05:13 PM
Spot wrote:
> Well you are right up there on the idiot list with her if you think they
> will be OK.

ouch stop you're hurting me

> There are a hell of a lot of dangers on a farm anywhere from farm equipment
> to getting attacked by a dog, coyote or fox. And I know a hell of alot more
> about farm life than you do.

well! why didn't you just say you knew more than me
coulda saved me a post

> At least I have enough common sense not to do
> something like this to house pets.

well a shelter is no picnic, physically or mentally
i'd rather take my chances on a farm than eat and crap in a small 18" x
26" wire cage

remember "burger and fries" the cat video someone poasted on here?

Anne has already said was safe, but wait! that's right...
according to you she's an idiot.. nevermind, i forgot about that

stick around Spot, we need someone like you to keep us idiots from
doing idiotic things

have you checked the children bitch?

Anne
September 13th 06, 09:16 PM
Well, so far so good. My family members have seen them playing with the
wild cats. It seems even the tamest has now turned wild and will run
and hide from my family member when he comes to feed them. He used to
not run from him, but the other two ran from everyone. Do you think
maybe my cats are playing "follow the leader" since the wild cats have
lived there longer?
Anne wrote:
> I had to take my 3 kitties out the farm, they have always been indoor
> cats. It has been 1 week and they are still terrified of everything.
> There are no other animals that can approach them, just the wild barn
> kitties, but they can hear dogs, goats and pigs. Has anyone been in
> this situation and how long did it take for the cats to adjust? They
> are about 4 years old.

-L.
September 14th 06, 12:40 AM
Anne wrote:
> Well, so far so good. My family members have seen them playing with the
> wild cats. It seems even the tamest has now turned wild and will run
> and hide from my family member when he comes to feed them. He used to
> not run from him, but the other two ran from everyone. Do you think
> maybe my cats are playing "follow the leader" since the wild cats have
> lived there longer?

Tame cats will revert to being feral in sometimes as little as two
weeks. Your cats will revert to being feral.

-L.

Anne
September 14th 06, 01:34 AM
Oh, that explains it. I could not remember the word feral. Thanks.
-L. wrote:
> Anne wrote:
> > Well, so far so good. My family members have seen them playing with the
> > wild cats. It seems even the tamest has now turned wild and will run
> > and hide from my family member when he comes to feed them. He used to
> > not run from him, but the other two ran from everyone. Do you think
> > maybe my cats are playing "follow the leader" since the wild cats have
> > lived there longer?
>
> Tame cats will revert to being feral in sometimes as little as two
> weeks. Your cats will revert to being feral.
>
> -L.

September 17th 06, 11:29 AM
Anne wrote:
> Oh, that explains it. I could not remember the word feral. Thanks.
> -L. wrote:
> > Anne wrote:
> > > Well, so far so good. My family members have seen them playing with the
> > > wild cats. It seems even the tamest has now turned wild and will run
> > > and hide from my family member when he comes to feed them. He used to
> > > not run from him, but the other two ran from everyone. Do you think
> > > maybe my cats are playing "follow the leader" since the wild cats have
> > > lived there longer?
> >
> > Tame cats will revert to being feral in sometimes as little as two
> > weeks. Your cats will revert to being feral.
> >
> > -L.

If they use farm machinery on fields, tell them, if possible, to look
out for any cats since it's very easy to take the leg off a barn cat
who is lazing about in the field and for some reason does not hear the
tractor or does not realize the tractor is pulling a whirling blade or
machinery of some kind.

Ryan Robbins
September 17th 06, 10:41 PM
> wrote in message
oups.com...
>
> If they use farm machinery on fields, tell them, if possible, to look
> out for any cats since it's very easy to take the leg off a barn cat
> who is lazing about in the field and for some reason does not hear the
> tractor or does not realize the tractor is pulling a whirling blade or
> machinery of some kind.

Back in the days when I was a child and my family rented an old farmhouse,
we used to let our cats outdoors. When hay season began in late July, we
were smart enough to keep the two outdoor cats indoors. The third cat began
life as an outdoor cat but we kept her indoors after one of her hind legs
was broken when she was hit by a pickup truck.

Since then, all of my family's cats have been kept indoors.