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Stacia
September 20th 06, 03:14 PM
Hi all. For a while now I've posted occasionally about my cat Spam,
who's about 15 years old now, and has CRF, cardiomyopathy, and was born
with cerebellar hypoplasia. Spam hasn't been able to walk very far for
a few years now, he doesn't play and pretty much all he has done is sit
in his chair and occasionally meow for attention.
Since he seems to have declined considerably, we've decided it's time
to let him go. Two months ago the vet said Spam was reasonably fine,
but Spam's mobility has consistently decreased since then.
He has lots of accidents. He can't get around anymore, and we have to
carry him to the catpans and food bowls. If he does get off his chair
on his own he's unable to get back into it (it's his sleepy spot) and
he's too confused to understand what's going on when we try new, easier
to get into sleepy spots. He forgets he can't walk and jump and has
hurt himself twice recently, so we have to watch him constantly to make
sure he's okay. He gets pills twice a day and he hates it terribly.
Physically he's lost weight, he's incontinent, often nauseous and
vomits or spits up, lethargic, and occasionally acts "out of it".
He does still like his soft food treat and he will eat and drink when
carried to the bowls. He will use the catpan most of the time if we
carry him there. Sometimes he likes being petted. That's what makes
this so hard, I keep thinking he must still be happy, but every day he
gets worse.
We just can't spend all day carrying him places and watching him. I'm
losing sleep with worry and he's so unhappy, uncomfortable and probably
in pain. This is no kind of life for a cat.

Stacia

22brix
September 20th 06, 03:29 PM
I'm so sorry. It's such a tough decision to make but ultimately it's
probably the kindest thing for Spam.
Best regards, Bonnie

"Stacia" > wrote in message
...
> Hi all. For a while now I've posted occasionally about my cat Spam,
> who's about 15 years old now, and has CRF, cardiomyopathy, and was born
> with cerebellar hypoplasia. Spam hasn't been able to walk very far for
> a few years now, he doesn't play and pretty much all he has done is sit
> in his chair and occasionally meow for attention.
> Since he seems to have declined considerably, we've decided it's time
> to let him go. Two months ago the vet said Spam was reasonably fine,
> but Spam's mobility has consistently decreased since then.
> He has lots of accidents. He can't get around anymore, and we have to
> carry him to the catpans and food bowls. If he does get off his chair
> on his own he's unable to get back into it (it's his sleepy spot) and
> he's too confused to understand what's going on when we try new, easier
> to get into sleepy spots. He forgets he can't walk and jump and has
> hurt himself twice recently, so we have to watch him constantly to make
> sure he's okay. He gets pills twice a day and he hates it terribly.
> Physically he's lost weight, he's incontinent, often nauseous and
> vomits or spits up, lethargic, and occasionally acts "out of it".
> He does still like his soft food treat and he will eat and drink when
> carried to the bowls. He will use the catpan most of the time if we
> carry him there. Sometimes he likes being petted. That's what makes
> this so hard, I keep thinking he must still be happy, but every day he
> gets worse.
> We just can't spend all day carrying him places and watching him. I'm
> losing sleep with worry and he's so unhappy, uncomfortable and probably
> in pain. This is no kind of life for a cat.
>
> Stacia
>

-L.
September 20th 06, 05:36 PM
Stacia wrote:
> Hi all. For a while now I've posted occasionally about my cat Spam,
> who's about 15 years old now, and has CRF, cardiomyopathy, and was born
> with cerebellar hypoplasia.

Stacia, it sounds to me like you are making the right decision. Please
read the following link, as I think it might be helpful:

http://angelshavenhere.homestead.com/makingthedecision.html

It's never easy to do, and IMO, and IME, it's always best to err on the
side of caution rather than to let the animal suffer too much. Take
care, and we will keep you in our thoughts.

-L.

Elizabeth
September 20th 06, 06:30 PM
Dear Stacia,
You have my very real sympathy. I still vividly remember going through
this decision for our first cat, Tiger. That was many years ago, but
the memory of how very hard it was is still intense. My heart goes out
to you!
Elizabeth

Stacia wrote:
> Hi all. For a while now I've posted occasionally about my cat Spam,
> who's about 15 years old now, and has CRF, cardiomyopathy, and was born
> with cerebellar hypoplasia. Spam hasn't been able to walk very far for
> a few years now, he doesn't play and pretty much all he has done is sit
> in his chair and occasionally meow for attention.
> Since he seems to have declined considerably, we've decided it's time
> to let him go. Two months ago the vet said Spam was reasonably fine,
> but Spam's mobility has consistently decreased since then.

Mig
September 20th 06, 07:37 PM
It is never easy to make that decision. Having had to make it myself
more times than I care to remember (and I'm having to make it now as
we speak), it's traumatic every single time.

But when it breaks your heart to see them existing in such a horrid
state, you know it's the right thing to do. Take consolation from the
fact that it's done out of pure love for your beloved pet.

You have my deepest sympathies Stacia, and I'll put a prayer in for
Spam along with my own.

Best regards,
Mig

On Wed, 20 Sep 2006 07:29:27 -0700, "22brix" >
wrote:
>I'm so sorry. It's such a tough decision to make but ultimately it's
>probably the kindest thing for Spam.
>Best regards, Bonnie
>
>"Stacia" > wrote in message
...
>> Hi all. For a while now I've posted occasionally about my cat Spam,
>> who's about 15 years old now, and has CRF, cardiomyopathy, and was born
>> with cerebellar hypoplasia. Spam hasn't been able to walk very far for
>> a few years now, he doesn't play and pretty much all he has done is sit
>> in his chair and occasionally meow for attention.
>> Since he seems to have declined considerably, we've decided it's time
>> to let him go. Two months ago the vet said Spam was reasonably fine,
>> but Spam's mobility has consistently decreased since then.
>> He has lots of accidents. He can't get around anymore, and we have to
>> carry him to the catpans and food bowls. If he does get off his chair
>> on his own he's unable to get back into it (it's his sleepy spot) and
>> he's too confused to understand what's going on when we try new, easier
>> to get into sleepy spots. He forgets he can't walk and jump and has
>> hurt himself twice recently, so we have to watch him constantly to make
>> sure he's okay. He gets pills twice a day and he hates it terribly.
>> Physically he's lost weight, he's incontinent, often nauseous and
>> vomits or spits up, lethargic, and occasionally acts "out of it".
>> He does still like his soft food treat and he will eat and drink when
>> carried to the bowls. He will use the catpan most of the time if we
>> carry him there. Sometimes he likes being petted. That's what makes
>> this so hard, I keep thinking he must still be happy, but every day he
>> gets worse.
>> We just can't spend all day carrying him places and watching him. I'm
>> losing sleep with worry and he's so unhappy, uncomfortable and probably
>> in pain. This is no kind of life for a cat.
>>
>> Stacia
>>
>

chili palmer
September 20th 06, 10:36 PM
Stacia wrote:
> thinking he must still be happy, but every day he
> gets worse.
> We just can't spend all day carrying him places and watching him. I'm
> losing sleep with worry and he's so unhappy, uncomfortable and probably
> in pain. This is no kind of life for a cat.
>
> Stacia

Oh I know it must be heart breaking

I know this sounds silly, but have you thought about, talking about it
Spam?

I am sure he knows what's up

If anything, he does not like seeing you and your family, like this.

Talk about it, and at some point, you will know when the time is right,
Im sorry to even say that! but you will know.. I think it could be
better than just getting up one morning, with no warning.. and making
that trip.

The other possibility is that your cat could pass in it's sleep.
Not likely though.,. they are tough little things.

So, tell the cat it's condition and your views, to get it's affairs in
order, I think you will never regret doing this in a planned way with
you cat. Ok, I know they may not understand english, but so what.. I'm
sure he will find you voice and tone and release a comfort to him.

maybe in telling him, it would give you a different take and strength
on the matter.

Regards

Barry

Stacia
September 20th 06, 10:58 PM
Thanks everyone for the kind words. We've decided to have the vet
check Spam out tomorrow and hold off on putting him down. I just can't
do it yet, although logically I know he doesn't have a lot of time.
He's somewhat more alert this afternoon and I'd feel better if a vet saw
him again once more before we made a final decision.

Stacia

chili palmer
September 21st 06, 12:41 AM
Stacia wrote:

> He's somewhat more alert this afternoon and I'd feel better if a vet saw
> him again once more before we made a final decision.
>
> Stacia

That's good news Stacia

T
September 21st 06, 12:45 AM
In article >, says...
> Hi all. For a while now I've posted occasionally about my cat Spam,
> who's about 15 years old now, and has CRF, cardiomyopathy, and was born
> with cerebellar hypoplasia. Spam hasn't been able to walk very far for
> a few years now, he doesn't play and pretty much all he has done is sit
> in his chair and occasionally meow for attention.
> Since he seems to have declined considerably, we've decided it's time
> to let him go. Two months ago the vet said Spam was reasonably fine,
> but Spam's mobility has consistently decreased since then.
> He has lots of accidents. He can't get around anymore, and we have to
> carry him to the catpans and food bowls. If he does get off his chair
> on his own he's unable to get back into it (it's his sleepy spot) and
> he's too confused to understand what's going on when we try new, easier
> to get into sleepy spots. He forgets he can't walk and jump and has
> hurt himself twice recently, so we have to watch him constantly to make
> sure he's okay. He gets pills twice a day and he hates it terribly.
> Physically he's lost weight, he's incontinent, often nauseous and
> vomits or spits up, lethargic, and occasionally acts "out of it".
> He does still like his soft food treat and he will eat and drink when
> carried to the bowls. He will use the catpan most of the time if we
> carry him there. Sometimes he likes being petted. That's what makes
> this so hard, I keep thinking he must still be happy, but every day he
> gets worse.
> We just can't spend all day carrying him places and watching him. I'm
> losing sleep with worry and he's so unhappy, uncomfortable and probably
> in pain. This is no kind of life for a cat.
>
> Stacia
>
>

Stacia,

It's a hard decision to make. My Cosimo was only 9 when I had to
euthanize him.

But it appears that Spam's decline is pretty obvious. You've given him a
good home and good care for 15 years.

I think you've rationalized it for yourself. My best to you.

T

Alison
September 21st 06, 08:51 AM
"Stacia" > wrote in message
...
> Hi all. For a while now I've posted occasionally about my cat Spam,
> who's about 15 years old now, and has CRF, cardiomyopathy, and was born
> with cerebellar hypoplasia. Spam hasn't been able to walk very far for
> a few years now, he doesn't play and pretty much all he has done is sit
> in his chair and occasionally meow for attention.
> Since he seems to have declined considerably, we've decided it's time
> to let him go. Two months ago the vet said Spam was reasonably fine,
> but Spam's mobility has consistently decreased since then.
> He has lots of accidents. He can't get around anymore, and we have to
> carry him to the catpans and food bowls. If he does get off his chair
> on his own he's unable to get back into it (it's his sleepy spot) and
> he's too confused to understand what's going on when we try new, easier
> to get into sleepy spots. He forgets he can't walk and jump and has
> hurt himself twice recently, so we have to watch him constantly to make
> sure he's okay. He gets pills twice a day and he hates it terribly.
> Physically he's lost weight, he's incontinent, often nauseous and
> vomits or spits up, lethargic, and occasionally acts "out of it".
> He does still like his soft food treat and he will eat and drink when
> carried to the bowls. He will use the catpan most of the time if we
> carry him there. Sometimes he likes being petted. That's what makes
> this so hard, I keep thinking he must still be happy, but every day he
> gets worse.
> We just can't spend all day carrying him places and watching him. I'm
> losing sleep with worry and he's so unhappy, uncomfortable and probably
> in pain. This is no kind of life for a cat.
>
> Stacia>>

I'm so sorry. It's a very hard decision to make but it's kinder not to let
Spam suffer.
Alison
>

barb
September 21st 06, 12:43 PM
Fifteen is the oldest any of my cats have lived and they always went for
yearly check-ups, shots and had all the treatments they needed. While I
know some cats live longer I guess 15 is fairly old.

You are doing what's best for Spam and whatever you decide I'm with you.

--
Barb
Of course I don't look busy,
I did it right the first time.

Elizabeth
September 21st 06, 02:42 PM
What a terrific idea! Seriously -- I know they don't understand the
words we use, but they sure understand the emotions we express, and to
some extent even the meaning of the words to us. When it comes time to
face this decision with my Jasmine, I'll do just what you've suggested!

Elizabeth

chili palmer wrote:
>
> I know this sounds silly, but have you thought about, talking about it
> Spam?
>
> I am sure he knows what's up
>
> If anything, he does not like seeing you and your family, like this.
>
> Talk about it, and at some point, you will know when the time is right,
> Im sorry to even say that! but you will know.. I think it could be
> better than just getting up one morning, with no warning.. and making
> that trip.
>
> The other possibility is that your cat could pass in it's sleep.
> Not likely though.,. they are tough little things.
>
> So, tell the cat it's condition and your views, to get it's affairs in
> order, I think you will never regret doing this in a planned way with
> you cat. Ok, I know they may not understand english, but so what.. I'm
> sure he will find you voice and tone and release a comfort to him.
>
> maybe in telling him, it would give you a different take and strength
> on the matter.
>
> Regards
>
> Barry

dgk
September 21st 06, 02:56 PM
On Wed, 20 Sep 2006 14:14:54 +0000 (UTC), (Stacia)
wrote:

> Hi all. For a while now I've posted occasionally about my cat Spam,
>who's about 15 years old now, and has CRF, cardiomyopathy, and was born
>with cerebellar hypoplasia. Spam hasn't been able to walk very far for
>a few years now, he doesn't play and pretty much all he has done is sit
>in his chair and occasionally meow for attention.
> Since he seems to have declined considerably, we've decided it's time
>to let him go. Two months ago the vet said Spam was reasonably fine,
>but Spam's mobility has consistently decreased since then.
> He has lots of accidents. He can't get around anymore, and we have to
>carry him to the catpans and food bowls. If he does get off his chair
>on his own he's unable to get back into it (it's his sleepy spot) and
>he's too confused to understand what's going on when we try new, easier
>to get into sleepy spots. He forgets he can't walk and jump and has
>hurt himself twice recently, so we have to watch him constantly to make
>sure he's okay. He gets pills twice a day and he hates it terribly.
> Physically he's lost weight, he's incontinent, often nauseous and
>vomits or spits up, lethargic, and occasionally acts "out of it".
> He does still like his soft food treat and he will eat and drink when
>carried to the bowls. He will use the catpan most of the time if we
>carry him there. Sometimes he likes being petted. That's what makes
>this so hard, I keep thinking he must still be happy, but every day he
>gets worse.
> We just can't spend all day carrying him places and watching him. I'm
>losing sleep with worry and he's so unhappy, uncomfortable and probably
>in pain. This is no kind of life for a cat.
>
>Stacia

There's no winning with this situation. We're either unhappy because
we waited too long to put them out of misery or we worry that we
hurried them to death. Since they can't talk we can only guess what is
best. See what the vet says now but it sure sounds like he's suffering
too much.

Rhonda
September 21st 06, 05:35 PM
I think that's a good idea, Stacia.

Do everything you need to do to be certain. Worse than having to make
that decision, is having any lingering doubts.

Take care,

Rhonda

Stacia wrote:
> Thanks everyone for the kind words. We've decided to have the vet
> check Spam out tomorrow and hold off on putting him down. I just can't
> do it yet, although logically I know he doesn't have a lot of time.
> He's somewhat more alert this afternoon and I'd feel better if a vet saw
> him again once more before we made a final decision.
>
> Stacia
>

Stacia
September 21st 06, 07:07 PM
"Elizabeth" > writes:

>What a terrific idea!

It's not a bad idea, you're right.


>chili palmer wrote:
>>
>> I know this sounds silly, but have you thought about, talking about it
>> Spam?
>>
>> I am sure he knows what's up
>>
>> If anything, he does not like seeing you and your family, like this.

It's a good idea. Thanks for the suggestion. I might try it but to
be honest, I don't know if it would work with Spam. He's been
singularly stubborn and kind of dim his whole life. That sounds mean
but it's not, he does have the cerebellar hypoplasia which might be part
of the issue.
Today he's doing well again. I hope the vet can give us a little
insight.

Stacia

Grawun
September 21st 06, 08:24 PM
I can't think of a harder decision to have to make. The vet started
talking to me about euthanasia for my big dog about 2 years before I
could go ahead with it. My dog was very deaf and blind and couldn't
control his bowels which embarassed him terribly. One day he couldn't
stand up or even hold his head up straight. I had to let him go. It is
so difficult to get past our own feelings and do what is best for our
pets at the end. You have given Spam 15 happy years and he knows he is
loved. You should have no regrets when you let him go.

dgk wrote:
> On Wed, 20 Sep 2006 14:14:54 +0000 (UTC), (Stacia)
> wrote:
>
> > Hi all. For a while now I've posted occasionally about my cat Spam,
> >who's about 15 years old now, and has CRF, cardiomyopathy, and was born
> >with cerebellar hypoplasia. Spam hasn't been able to walk very far for
> >a few years now, he doesn't play and pretty much all he has done is sit
> >in his chair and occasionally meow for attention.
> > Since he seems to have declined considerably, we've decided it's time
> >to let him go. Two months ago the vet said Spam was reasonably fine,
> >but Spam's mobility has consistently decreased since then.
> > He has lots of accidents. He can't get around anymore, and we have to
> >carry him to the catpans and food bowls. If he does get off his chair
> >on his own he's unable to get back into it (it's his sleepy spot) and
> >he's too confused to understand what's going on when we try new, easier
> >to get into sleepy spots. He forgets he can't walk and jump and has
> >hurt himself twice recently, so we have to watch him constantly to make
> >sure he's okay. He gets pills twice a day and he hates it terribly.
> > Physically he's lost weight, he's incontinent, often nauseous and
> >vomits or spits up, lethargic, and occasionally acts "out of it".
> > He does still like his soft food treat and he will eat and drink when
> >carried to the bowls. He will use the catpan most of the time if we
> >carry him there. Sometimes he likes being petted. That's what makes
> >this so hard, I keep thinking he must still be happy, but every day he
> >gets worse.
> > We just can't spend all day carrying him places and watching him. I'm
> >losing sleep with worry and he's so unhappy, uncomfortable and probably
> >in pain. This is no kind of life for a cat.
> >
> >Stacia
>
> There's no winning with this situation. We're either unhappy because
> we waited too long to put them out of misery or we worry that we
> hurried them to death. Since they can't talk we can only guess what is
> best. See what the vet says now but it sure sounds like he's suffering
> too much.

cybercat
September 21st 06, 08:24 PM
"Stacia" > wrote:
>
> It's a good idea. Thanks for the suggestion. I might try it but to
> be honest, I don't know if it would work with Spam. He's been
> singularly stubborn and kind of dim his whole life. That sounds mean
> but it's not, he does have the cerebellar hypoplasia which might be part
> of the issue.
> Today he's doing well again. I hope the vet can give us a little
> insight.
>

He knows you, knows your tone, your inflection. He does not
have to be bright. I think Barry is right, you should talk to him.
My 20 year old was the dumbest and most unpleasant cat
I have ever known (but thankfully my first, and I did not know
that it got any better than that). I adored her and she was with
me for 19.5 years. She was stump stupid--but we were attuned
to one another. It is a very good idea to sit with him and
touch him and have a long talk with him, for many reasons.

Eva Quesnell
September 21st 06, 09:50 PM
On Thu, 21 Sep 2006, Stacia wrote:

> Today he's doing well again. I hope the vet can give us a little
> insight.
>
> Stacia

There is a certain look that comes into an animal's eyes when it is ready
to go. Once you see the look, you will never forget it -- you will always
know when it's the right time after you've seen it. If your vet is good,
he'll know the look, too. It is our last act of kindness to spare them
from suffering. Bless your heart. I think we've all been where you are
now, and I know you'll do what's right for your baby.

Eva

Stacia
September 21st 06, 11:42 PM
"cybercat" > writes:
>"Stacia" > wrote:
>>
>> It's a good idea. Thanks for the suggestion. I might try it but to
>> be honest, I don't know if it would work with Spam. He's been
>> singularly stubborn and kind of dim his whole life. That sounds mean
>> but it's not, he does have the cerebellar hypoplasia which might be part
>> of the issue.

>He knows you, knows your tone, your inflection. He does not
>have to be bright. I think Barry is right, you should talk to him.
>My 20 year old was the dumbest and most unpleasant cat
>I have ever known (but thankfully my first, and I did not know
>that it got any better than that). I adored her and she was with
>me for 19.5 years. She was stump stupid--but we were attuned
>to one another. It is a very good idea to sit with him and
>touch him and have a long talk with him, for many reasons.

That's really sweet. Spam and I haven't bonded as close as I have
with our other cats, he was always aloof, but I understand crankiness
happens with cerebellar hypoplasia sometimes.
Yeah, I'm going to have a talk with Spam. The vet came by and said he
thought Spam either had a stroke or is starting to throw blood clots
from the cardiomyopathy. The improvement might be the body breaking
down a small clot and restoring blood flow, but that the chances of Spam
having a bigger stroke or blood clot emergency is high. We'll try
aspirin (half a child's aspirin every 3 days) but the vet encouraged us
to consider our options. He said a lot of people when asked say they
probably waited too long to let their pet go.

Stacia

Kitkat
September 22nd 06, 01:28 AM
Stacia wrote:
> "cybercat" > writes:
>
>>"Stacia" > wrote:
>>
>>> It's a good idea. Thanks for the suggestion. I might try it but to
>>>be honest, I don't know if it would work with Spam. He's been
>>>singularly stubborn and kind of dim his whole life. That sounds mean
>>>but it's not, he does have the cerebellar hypoplasia which might be part
>>>of the issue.
>
>
>>He knows you, knows your tone, your inflection. He does not
>>have to be bright. I think Barry is right, you should talk to him.
>>My 20 year old was the dumbest and most unpleasant cat
>>I have ever known (but thankfully my first, and I did not know
>>that it got any better than that). I adored her and she was with
>>me for 19.5 years. She was stump stupid--but we were attuned
>>to one another. It is a very good idea to sit with him and
>>touch him and have a long talk with him, for many reasons.
>
>
> That's really sweet. Spam and I haven't bonded as close as I have
> with our other cats, he was always aloof, but I understand crankiness
> happens with cerebellar hypoplasia sometimes.
> Yeah, I'm going to have a talk with Spam. The vet came by and said he
> thought Spam either had a stroke or is starting to throw blood clots
> from the cardiomyopathy. The improvement might be the body breaking
> down a small clot and restoring blood flow, but that the chances of Spam
> having a bigger stroke or blood clot emergency is high. We'll try
> aspirin (half a child's aspirin every 3 days) but the vet encouraged us
> to consider our options. He said a lot of people when asked say they
> probably waited too long to let their pet go.
>
> Stacia
>

All my best to you, Stacia. This stuff totally sucks. It has not even
been a month since I lost my Dudley and I miss him soooo much. But, I
just wanted to share this:
The night before (literally...hours before) dudley died, Tim and I had
decided we needed to take him in the morning. It was very clear he was
suffering and it was horrible. We stayed with him until late that night,
pet him as much as he would let us, cried alot...and Tim talked to
Dudley. He told Dudley it was okay to let go and that we understood. He
must have said it several times.

Now, Dudley was a DEAF (and blind) cat. He couldnt "hear" us per
se...but I'll be damned if my little guy didn't pass on just hours after
Tim said those words to him.

I think there is something to it. It might sound kooky to someone else
but to us it makes perfect sense.

Incidentally, today would have been his 14th birthday.
:(

We're with you, Stacia! Good luck!
Pam

Rhonda
September 22nd 06, 07:05 AM
Kitkat wrote:
> The night before (literally...hours before) dudley died, Tim and I had
> decided we needed to take him in the morning. It was very clear he was
> suffering and it was horrible. We stayed with him until late that night,
> pet him as much as he would let us, cried alot...and Tim talked to
> Dudley. He told Dudley it was okay to let go and that we understood. He
> must have said it several times.
>
> Now, Dudley was a DEAF (and blind) cat. He couldnt "hear" us per
> se...but I'll be damned if my little guy didn't pass on just hours after
> Tim said those words to him.


Awww, this was so sad and so sweet. Animals must use more than just
their ears to listen to us.

Rhonda

-L.
September 22nd 06, 07:35 AM
Stacia wrote:
> That's really sweet. Spam and I haven't bonded as close as I have
> with our other cats, he was always aloof, but I understand crankiness
> happens with cerebellar hypoplasia sometimes.
> Yeah, I'm going to have a talk with Spam. The vet came by and said he
> thought Spam either had a stroke or is starting to throw blood clots
> from the cardiomyopathy. The improvement might be the body breaking
> down a small clot and restoring blood flow, but that the chances of Spam
> having a bigger stroke or blood clot emergency is high. We'll try
> aspirin (half a child's aspirin every 3 days) but the vet encouraged us
> to consider our options. He said a lot of people when asked say they
> probably waited too long to let their pet go.
>
> Stacia

Regardless of when you do it, you will second-guess yourself, after the
fact. The best words my vet said to me when my dog was disgnosed with
terminal cancer was "Don't let her suffer." Those words rang in my
ears for months. When I did finally have her euthanized, I did it at
home, on a day when she was having a good day (as luck would have it).
She fought the pre-sed and so afterward I was heartbroken that I may
have euthanized her too soon. But later I found a photograph taken 3
months prior to her death, where she looked *so* much better than the
day I had euthanized her - she almost looked like a different dog. So
I am now sure that I made the right choice, at the right time, and I
ended her suffering.

No one can tell you when it's the right time. You have to decide and
hopefully Spam will let you know. Having counseled many clients on
euthanasia I would also reiterate what your vet said. It's so much
better to do it before the situation becomes "We waited too long".

-L.

chili palmer
September 22nd 06, 10:41 AM
Stacia wrote:

> That's really sweet. Spam and I haven't bonded as close as I have
> with our other cats, he was always aloof, but I understand crankiness
> happens with cerebellar hypoplasia sometimes.
> Yeah, I'm going to have a talk with Spam.

I hear ya, the rule is this: Whatever you are feeling, he is feeling
the same thing

it don't have to be all serious, you could just talk to him across the
room you know

old men are like that, they get cynical and tough, wouldn't dare show a
litte emotion, lol

ol hard ankles

lol... bless your heart, I know it's rough. I had a male cat for a
short time, and believe me, he took a piece of me with him when he
left.

What you need is an ice-breaker :D

Im sorry, but this is playing just now.. and.. well..
<passing a tissue>

There is a fine line between laughing and crying, and both can be a
gift.

"One Step Closer"
by U2

I'm 'round the corner from anything that's real
I'm across the road from hope
I'm under a bridge in a rip tide
That's taken everything I call my own

One step closer to knowing
One step closer to knowing

I'm on an island at a busy intersection
I can't go forward, I can't turn back
Can't see the future
It's getting away from me
I just watch the tail lights glowing

One step closer to knowing
One step closer to knowing
One step closer to knowing
Knowing, knowing

I'm hanging out to dry
With my old clothes
Finger still red with the prick of an old rose
Well the heart that hurts
Is a heart that beats
Can you hear the drummer slowing?

One step closer to knowing
One step closer to knowing
One step closer to knowing
To knowing, to knowing, to knowing

--
it's a real pretty song

it's been in my head all day.

I'm round the corner from anything that real..
... I like the 3rd verse, it just gives me a little focus these days.

dgk
September 22nd 06, 01:48 PM
On Wed, 20 Sep 2006 21:58:49 +0000 (UTC), (Stacia)
wrote:

>
> Thanks everyone for the kind words. We've decided to have the vet
>check Spam out tomorrow and hold off on putting him down. I just can't
>do it yet, although logically I know he doesn't have a lot of time.
>He's somewhat more alert this afternoon and I'd feel better if a vet saw
>him again once more before we made a final decision.
>
>Stacia

That's best. My vet told me when it was time with Jackie. I brought
her in for yet another problem and he said that it was time and that
she would just suffer if I took her home.

mdsu
September 22nd 06, 04:11 PM
Stacia wrote:
> Hi all. For a while now I've posted occasionally about my cat Spam,
> who's about 15 years old now, and has CRF, cardiomyopathy, and was born
> with cerebellar hypoplasia. Spam hasn't been able to walk very far for
> a few years now, he doesn't play and pretty much all he has done is sit
> in his chair and occasionally meow for attention.
> Since he seems to have declined considerably, we've decided it's time
> to let him go. Two months ago the vet said Spam was reasonably fine,
> but Spam's mobility has consistently decreased since then.
> He has lots of accidents. He can't get around anymore, and we have to
> carry him to the catpans and food bowls. If he does get off his chair
> on his own he's unable to get back into it (it's his sleepy spot) and
> he's too confused to understand what's going on when we try new, easier
> to get into sleepy spots. He forgets he can't walk and jump and has
> hurt himself twice recently, so we have to watch him constantly to make
> sure he's okay. He gets pills twice a day and he hates it terribly.
> Physically he's lost weight, he's incontinent, often nauseous and
> vomits or spits up, lethargic, and occasionally acts "out of it".
> He does still like his soft food treat and he will eat and drink when
> carried to the bowls. He will use the catpan most of the time if we
> carry him there. Sometimes he likes being petted. That's what makes
> this so hard, I keep thinking he must still be happy, but every day he
> gets worse.
> We just can't spend all day carrying him places and watching him. I'm
> losing sleep with worry and he's so unhappy, uncomfortable and probably
> in pain. This is no kind of life for a cat.
>
> Stacia
>

Stacia,

I'm very sorry about Spam. I know what you're going through. I put my
cat, Al, down on August 28. He was about 16 yo, and I had him 14 years.
Putting Al down was one of the hardest things I've ever done. I really
loved Al! He developed lung cancer, and I put him down at the right
time. I would have regretted waiting any longer. Al died a very peaceful
and fast death in my arms. Ending a pet's suffering is very hard on us,
but it's the right thing to do for them. My best to you.

Rich

Stacia
September 30th 06, 09:12 AM
(Stacia) writes:

We had our cat Spam put down this evening. The poor guy.

Last week I said:

> Thanks everyone for the kind words. We've decided to have the vet
>check Spam out tomorrow and hold off on putting him down. I just can't
>do it yet, although logically I know he doesn't have a lot of time.

The vet felt Spam had suffered a small stroke or was throwing blood
clots which were somewhat dissolving, which accounted for Spam's slight
improvement. So we waited a few days but Spam started having nausea and
pain when using the cat pan, he couldn't walk well again, etc.
At first we decided to have the vet come by and put spam to sleep next
week, but today when I got up Spam was breathing heavy and lethargic.
He's lost even more weight, and was all fur and bones. So the vet came
by tonight after I panicked and thought maybe I'd waited too long to do
this.
I couldn't stop crying. I've been a wreck, I even hyperventilated.
So far the other cats are kind of confused but not so much they're
worried.
Anyhow, the procedure wasn't very peaceful -- the sedative made him
spit up, he fought the sedative, then hissed when the final needle went
in his arm. God it was awful. I'll definitely think twice before
having a cat put down again. I'd read online that it was all peaceful
and quick but that's not always the case. He did go quickly though,
before the shot was even finished.

Stacia

kitkat via CatKB.com
September 30th 06, 04:34 PM
you're defintely doing the right thing.

I think joy is an important part of a cat's life - and when it's replaced
with continual pain and apathy - well - I think it's time to let your cat be
free of that.

--
Message posted via http://www.catkb.com

cybercat
September 30th 06, 06:13 PM
"Stacia" > wrote in message
...
> (Stacia) writes:
>
> We had our cat Spam put down this evening. The poor guy.
>
[...]> I couldn't stop crying. I've been a wreck, I even hyperventilated.
> So far the other cats are kind of confused but not so much they're
> worried.
> Anyhow, the procedure wasn't very peaceful -- the sedative made him
> spit up, he fought the sedative, then hissed when the final needle went
> in his arm. God it was awful. I'll definitely think twice before
> having a cat put down again. I'd read online that it was all peaceful
> and quick but that's not always the case. He did go quickly though,
> before the shot was even finished.
>

Stacia,

I'm so sorry for your loss. I know you did the right thing, it sounds like
Spam had been suffering for a while. It may have been harder at the end
because you waited a bit too long, but for all animals there are "good
deaths"
and "bad deaths" and though we always hope they will be "good" it just
can't always happen.

I definitely waited too long to have my cat euthanized, and that made
things harder on both of us.

No matter what, by having Spam euthanized rather than letting his last
illnesses take their time and ravage him, you saved him a lot of suffering.
It was the right thing to do, albeit incredibly painful for you. You did an
act of mercy, at great expense to yourself (emotionally) and that is a
great kindness.



--
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com

Stacia
September 30th 06, 07:08 PM
"cybercat" > writes:

>I'm so sorry for your loss. I know you did the right thing, it sounds like
>Spam had been suffering for a while. It may have been harder at the end
>because you waited a bit too long

I never thought of that. You're probably right, I know his veins were
hard to find, and that's likely because of the illness. The vet warned
us the sedative might make him spit up though. It wasn't completely a
bad death, I just got the impression Spam knew something was up and
maybe a was a little scared.
Thanks for your post, it definitely helped.

Stacia

Buddy's Mom
September 30th 06, 08:17 PM
I am so sorry for your loss. I have had to have three kitties put down
and all of them have been peaceful. I am sorry that your experience
wasn't.

Stacia wrote:
> (Stacia) writes:
>
> We had our cat Spam put down this evening. The poor guy.
>
> Last week I said:
>
> > Thanks everyone for the kind words. We've decided to have the vet
> >check Spam out tomorrow and hold off on putting him down. I just can't
> >do it yet, although logically I know he doesn't have a lot of time.
>
> The vet felt Spam had suffered a small stroke or was throwing blood
> clots which were somewhat dissolving, which accounted for Spam's slight
> improvement. So we waited a few days but Spam started having nausea and
> pain when using the cat pan, he couldn't walk well again, etc.
> At first we decided to have the vet come by and put spam to sleep next
> week, but today when I got up Spam was breathing heavy and lethargic.
> He's lost even more weight, and was all fur and bones. So the vet came
> by tonight after I panicked and thought maybe I'd waited too long to do
> this.
> I couldn't stop crying. I've been a wreck, I even hyperventilated.
> So far the other cats are kind of confused but not so much they're
> worried.
> Anyhow, the procedure wasn't very peaceful -- the sedative made him
> spit up, he fought the sedative, then hissed when the final needle went
> in his arm. God it was awful. I'll definitely think twice before
> having a cat put down again. I'd read online that it was all peaceful
> and quick but that's not always the case. He did go quickly though,
> before the shot was even finished.
>
> Stacia

-L.
October 1st 06, 06:46 AM
Stacia wrote:
> The vet felt Spam had suffered a small stroke or was throwing blood
> clots which were somewhat dissolving, which accounted for Spam's slight
> improvement. So we waited a few days but Spam started having nausea and
> pain when using the cat pan, he couldn't walk well again, etc.
> At first we decided to have the vet come by and put spam to sleep next
> week, but today when I got up Spam was breathing heavy and lethargic.
> He's lost even more weight, and was all fur and bones. So the vet came
> by tonight after I panicked and thought maybe I'd waited too long to do
> this.
> I couldn't stop crying. I've been a wreck, I even hyperventilated.
> So far the other cats are kind of confused but not so much they're
> worried.
> Anyhow, the procedure wasn't very peaceful -- the sedative made him
> spit up, he fought the sedative, then hissed when the final needle went
> in his arm. God it was awful. I'll definitely think twice before
> having a cat put down again. I'd read online that it was all peaceful
> and quick but that's not always the case. He did go quickly though,
> before the shot was even finished.
>
> Stacia

Despute the fact it wasn't "pretty" you did the best thing you could
have done by euthanizing him. You ended his suffering, which was the
humane thing to do. Please know you did the right thing.

take care,
-L.

meeee
October 2nd 06, 12:40 AM
((((Stacia))))) Even if it was hard, you still did the right thing. You were
doing what was best for him, and he would have known that. It is better that
he didn't have to go through all that suffering and pain; a few minutes
distress is nothinbg compared to what he would have gone through otherwise,
you were a loving and merciful friend, and that is all he would have asked
for.
"Stacia" > wrote in message
...
> (Stacia) writes:
>
> We had our cat Spam put down this evening. The poor guy.
>
> Last week I said:
>
>> Thanks everyone for the kind words. We've decided to have the vet
>>check Spam out tomorrow and hold off on putting him down. I just can't
>>do it yet, although logically I know he doesn't have a lot of time.
>
> The vet felt Spam had suffered a small stroke or was throwing blood
> clots which were somewhat dissolving, which accounted for Spam's slight
> improvement. So we waited a few days but Spam started having nausea and
> pain when using the cat pan, he couldn't walk well again, etc.
> At first we decided to have the vet come by and put spam to sleep next
> week, but today when I got up Spam was breathing heavy and lethargic.
> He's lost even more weight, and was all fur and bones. So the vet came
> by tonight after I panicked and thought maybe I'd waited too long to do
> this.
> I couldn't stop crying. I've been a wreck, I even hyperventilated.
> So far the other cats are kind of confused but not so much they're
> worried.
> Anyhow, the procedure wasn't very peaceful -- the sedative made him
> spit up, he fought the sedative, then hissed when the final needle went
> in his arm. God it was awful. I'll definitely think twice before
> having a cat put down again. I'd read online that it was all peaceful
> and quick but that's not always the case. He did go quickly though,
> before the shot was even finished.
>
> Stacia
>
>

22brix
October 2nd 06, 02:00 AM
"Stacia" > wrote in message
...
> (Stacia) writes:
>
> We had our cat Spam put down this evening. The poor guy.
>
> Last week I said:
>
>> Thanks everyone for the kind words. We've decided to have the vet
>>check Spam out tomorrow and hold off on putting him down. I just can't
>>do it yet, although logically I know he doesn't have a lot of time.
>
> The vet felt Spam had suffered a small stroke or was throwing blood
> clots which were somewhat dissolving, which accounted for Spam's slight
> improvement. So we waited a few days but Spam started having nausea and
> pain when using the cat pan, he couldn't walk well again, etc.
> At first we decided to have the vet come by and put spam to sleep next
> week, but today when I got up Spam was breathing heavy and lethargic.
> He's lost even more weight, and was all fur and bones. So the vet came
> by tonight after I panicked and thought maybe I'd waited too long to do
> this.
> I couldn't stop crying. I've been a wreck, I even hyperventilated.
> So far the other cats are kind of confused but not so much they're
> worried.
> Anyhow, the procedure wasn't very peaceful -- the sedative made him
> spit up, he fought the sedative, then hissed when the final needle went
> in his arm. God it was awful. I'll definitely think twice before
> having a cat put down again. I'd read online that it was all peaceful
> and quick but that's not always the case. He did go quickly though,
> before the shot was even finished.
>
> Stacia
>
Oh Stacia, I'm so sorry. It's a hard enough decision to make without
complications. I think we all second-guess ourselves but I believe you made
the right choice. You obviously loved Spam well and you did the best thing
that you could.

Bonnie