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September 20th 06, 07:23 PM
I have two wonderful rescue cats whom I have lovingly dubbed "Crazy"
and "Lazy." Crazy was a stray that I took in after a co-worker found
him and offered him up. I've had him for almost a year now. He's been
to the vet, had his shots and, aside from being overweight (which is
being addressed with diet and play), is perfectly healthy.

But he's appropriately named, because he's driving me nuts.

I suppose it's because he was a stray and had to take measures to
ensure that his scent was covered in the "wild" suburban landscape, but
Crazy paws at the area around the litterbox. All around the litterbox,
which I keep in a spare shower stall (because there's absolutely
nowhere else to keep it). I'm talking standing up on his hind legs and
scraping (with his non-declawed front paws) at the tile until the noise
makes my teeth itch. Did I mention that this generally happens at
around 4 am? It's something akin to:

Crazy (around litterbox): "*SCRAPESCRAPESCRAPESCRAPE*"

Me: *waking up, angry, shouting groggily* "Quit that!"

Crazy (chastized): "Mew?"

*silence for half an hour, then repeat anew*

At this point, I would kill a man for a decent night's sleep. I
understand the logic behind it (burying his scent, survival mechanism,
etc.) but that doesn't mean that I like it or that I know how to stop
it. This cat does the same thing around his food dish (attempting to
"hide" his leftovers from predators or competitors), which doesn't
bother me so much because it's not as loud. As I said, moving the
litterbox isn't an option (when I lived in my last apartment, the
litter was in the laundry room and the pretty little freak scratched
the heck out of the washer/dryer with this pawing) and he's perfectly
healthy. My other cat doesn't do this, but she wasn't a stray (she was
rescued from a bad situation). It doesn't help matters that Crazy does
all of that pawing yet doesn't even bury his poop!

Any suggestions at all would be welcome by both me and my employer, who
doesn't believe "the cat kept me up all night" as an excuse for falling
asleep on the job.

Buddy's Mom
September 20th 06, 10:08 PM
Just my opinion, but perhaps Crazy is doing this to awaken you. And,
it is working!

wrote:
> I have two wonderful rescue cats whom I have lovingly dubbed "Crazy"
> and "Lazy." Crazy was a stray that I took in after a co-worker found
> him and offered him up. I've had him for almost a year now. He's been
> to the vet, had his shots and, aside from being overweight (which is
> being addressed with diet and play), is perfectly healthy.
>
> But he's appropriately named, because he's driving me nuts.
>
> I suppose it's because he was a stray and had to take measures to
> ensure that his scent was covered in the "wild" suburban landscape, but
> Crazy paws at the area around the litterbox. All around the litterbox,
> which I keep in a spare shower stall (because there's absolutely
> nowhere else to keep it). I'm talking standing up on his hind legs and
> scraping (with his non-declawed front paws) at the tile until the noise
> makes my teeth itch. Did I mention that this generally happens at
> around 4 am? It's something akin to:
>
> Crazy (around litterbox): "*SCRAPESCRAPESCRAPESCRAPE*"
>
> Me: *waking up, angry, shouting groggily* "Quit that!"
>
> Crazy (chastized): "Mew?"
>
> *silence for half an hour, then repeat anew*
>
> At this point, I would kill a man for a decent night's sleep. I
> understand the logic behind it (burying his scent, survival mechanism,
> etc.) but that doesn't mean that I like it or that I know how to stop
> it. This cat does the same thing around his food dish (attempting to
> "hide" his leftovers from predators or competitors), which doesn't
> bother me so much because it's not as loud. As I said, moving the
> litterbox isn't an option (when I lived in my last apartment, the
> litter was in the laundry room and the pretty little freak scratched
> the heck out of the washer/dryer with this pawing) and he's perfectly
> healthy. My other cat doesn't do this, but she wasn't a stray (she was
> rescued from a bad situation). It doesn't help matters that Crazy does
> all of that pawing yet doesn't even bury his poop!
>
> Any suggestions at all would be welcome by both me and my employer, who
> doesn't believe "the cat kept me up all night" as an excuse for falling
> asleep on the job.

September 20th 06, 10:17 PM
Buddy's Mom wrote:
> Just my opinion, but perhaps Crazy is doing this to awaken you. And,
> it is working!

So... Any suggestions for stopping the behavior, short of pretending
to be asleep (which gets old after 45 minutes of claws scraping on
tile)? I can't wear earplugs, because I wouldn't hear the alarm in the
morning!

Lynne
September 20th 06, 11:46 PM
wrote:
> Buddy's Mom wrote:
> > Just my opinion, but perhaps Crazy is doing this to awaken you. And,
> > it is working!
>
> So... Any suggestions for stopping the behavior, short of pretending
> to be asleep (which gets old after 45 minutes of claws scraping on
> tile)? I can't wear earplugs, because I wouldn't hear the alarm in the
> morning!

I would try a couple of things, such as putting a rug under the litter
box with an adhesive that you can remove later (ask someone at Home
Depot for a recommendation). Then he can scratch the rug but you won't
hear it. Or could try putting two way tape all around the litter box.
He won't scratch that for long! Of course litter will stick to it and
it will be a mess, but it may break him of this habit.

Another option might be to get a little sound machine and set it to
play white noise to drown out the scratching noises. The only downside
to this is you will become addicted (so get one that has an option for
battery use when you travel).

Good luck!

September 21st 06, 01:10 AM
> I would try a couple of things, such as putting a rug under the litter
> box with an adhesive that you can remove later (ask someone at Home
> Depot for a recommendation). Then he can scratch the rug but you won't
> hear it. Or could try putting two way tape all around the litter box.
> He won't scratch that for long! Of course litter will stick to it and
> it will be a mess, but it may break him of this habit.

See, maybe I wasn't entirely clear, but the issue is that he scratches
the *wall* - the tiled wall of the shower stall. I may try taping a
small rug to it, but I doubt that will work in the long run. I'd
rather break him of the habit than muffle the sound.

> Another option might be to get a little sound machine and set it to
> play white noise to drown out the scratching noises.

Wouldn't work - I'm a heavy sleeper, so white noise wouldn't even come
close to drowning out the nails-on-a-chalkboard noise he makes!

Thanks for the suggestions.

Buddy's Mom
September 21st 06, 01:29 AM
I do understand that it is the walls and I think that Kitty knows
exactly what she is doing and why. Yes, you would need to soften the
walls so you don't hear her noise. Unfortunately she will probably
find another way of awakening you though.

Maybe the best idea would be to confine HER to another room while you
sleep?

wrote:
> > I would try a couple of things, such as putting a rug under the litter
> > box with an adhesive that you can remove later (ask someone at Home
> > Depot for a recommendation). Then he can scratch the rug but you won't
> > hear it. Or could try putting two way tape all around the litter box.
> > He won't scratch that for long! Of course litter will stick to it and
> > it will be a mess, but it may break him of this habit.
>
> See, maybe I wasn't entirely clear, but the issue is that he scratches
> the *wall* - the tiled wall of the shower stall. I may try taping a
> small rug to it, but I doubt that will work in the long run. I'd
> rather break him of the habit than muffle the sound.
>
> > Another option might be to get a little sound machine and set it to
> > play white noise to drown out the scratching noises.
>
> Wouldn't work - I'm a heavy sleeper, so white noise wouldn't even come
> close to drowning out the nails-on-a-chalkboard noise he makes!
>
> Thanks for the suggestions.

meeee
September 21st 06, 01:34 AM
> wrote in message
oups.com...
>
>> I would try a couple of things, such as putting a rug under the litter
>> box with an adhesive that you can remove later (ask someone at Home
>> Depot for a recommendation). Then he can scratch the rug but you won't
>> hear it. Or could try putting two way tape all around the litter box.
>> He won't scratch that for long! Of course litter will stick to it and
>> it will be a mess, but it may break him of this habit.
>
> See, maybe I wasn't entirely clear, but the issue is that he scratches
> the *wall* - the tiled wall of the shower stall. I may try taping a
> small rug to it, but I doubt that will work in the long run. I'd
> rather break him of the habit than muffle the sound.
>
>> Another option might be to get a little sound machine and set it to
>> play white noise to drown out the scratching noises.
>
> Wouldn't work - I'm a heavy sleeper, so white noise wouldn't even come
> close to drowning out the nails-on-a-chalkboard noise he makes!
>
> Thanks for the suggestions.
>

Hi, I am having a similar problem at the moment. I don't allow my cats in my
room at night, as three of them are under 1 year, decide to play or fight at
3am and I never sleep. One of my girls, however, thinks it's her room and
has recently started scratching the door. Very loudly, for a long time, at
all hours. So I share your frustration. One thing that works (partially) is
tying some noisy, inconvenient things such as pan lids or wire coathangers
onto bits of string so that they hang over the area the cat scratches, so
that when the cat scratches, the objects get in their way and also make lots
of noise. Hard to sleep through, but it worked for a while. Now I am trying
the spray bottle. The minute she starts scratching, I open the door a crack
and squirt her thoroughly. try and do it without them seeing you, as it will
then seem like the direct result of them scratching. As my girl's very
bright, she seems to be getting the message. Make sure you only do it while
they are scratching, and stop as soon as they stop, so they get the message
that it's about the scratching, not the room or the shower. Just some ideas,
hope they help.

Rhonda
September 21st 06, 02:09 AM
I don't think I'd try spraying this cat while he's scratching, since
he's in a litter box. She could very well train him to stop using the
litter box if he's disciplined or scared while in it.

I think I would do all possible to find another place for the box. Is
there any other corner where it will fit? You can put a pretty screen in
front of it so it is out of view if that's the problem.

Good luck,

Rhonda

meeee wrote:
>
>Now I am trying
> the spray bottle. The minute she starts scratching, I open the door a crack
> and squirt her thoroughly. try and do it without them seeing you, as it will
> then seem like the direct result of them scratching. As my girl's very
> bright, she seems to be getting the message. Make sure you only do it while
> they are scratching, and stop as soon as they stop, so they get the message
> that it's about the scratching, not the room or the shower. Just some ideas,
> hope they help.
>
>

meeee
September 21st 06, 02:57 AM
"Rhonda" > wrote in message
...
>I don't think I'd try spraying this cat while he's scratching, since he's
>in a litter box. She could very well train him to stop using the litter box
>if he's disciplined or scared while in it.
>

Absolutely, I agree. I was under the impression that he was outside the
litter box, scratching at the shower walls. It would depend whether this was
his 'litter ritual' or whether he is just scratching for attention. Do yuo
know whether he does this everytime he goes to the toilet, or just at night
time? If he does it every time, then Rhonda is correct, don't spray him.
It's likely that he feels it's not sufficiently covered, maybe a larger
litter box with more litter? Does he like to dig a big hole? Try just
putting it in the middle of your loungeroom at night so he can't scratch any
nearby walls. I'm not sure.

meee
> I think I would do all possible to find another place for the box. Is
> there any other corner where it will fit? You can put a pretty screen in
> front of it so it is out of view if that's the problem.
>
> Good luck,
>
> Rhonda
>
> meeee wrote:
>> Now I am trying the spray bottle. The minute she starts scratching, I
>> open the door a crack and squirt her thoroughly. try and do it without
>> them seeing you, as it will then seem like the direct result of them
>> scratching. As my girl's very bright, she seems to be getting the
>> message. Make sure you only do it while they are scratching, and stop as
>> soon as they stop, so they get the message that it's about the
>> scratching, not the room or the shower. Just some ideas, hope they help.
>

Lynne
September 21st 06, 12:09 PM
clearly my reading comprehension skills need work!

What about double sided tape on all the shower walls? It shouldn't
hurt the tile, and he will hate it.

wrote:
> > I would try a couple of things, such as putting a rug under the litter
> > box with an adhesive that you can remove later (ask someone at Home
> > Depot for a recommendation). Then he can scratch the rug but you won't
> > hear it. Or could try putting two way tape all around the litter box.
> > He won't scratch that for long! Of course litter will stick to it and
> > it will be a mess, but it may break him of this habit.
>
> See, maybe I wasn't entirely clear, but the issue is that he scratches
> the *wall* - the tiled wall of the shower stall. I may try taping a
> small rug to it, but I doubt that will work in the long run. I'd
> rather break him of the habit than muffle the sound.
>
> > Another option might be to get a little sound machine and set it to
> > play white noise to drown out the scratching noises.
>
> Wouldn't work - I'm a heavy sleeper, so white noise wouldn't even come
> close to drowning out the nails-on-a-chalkboard noise he makes!
>
> Thanks for the suggestions.

Lightwell
September 21st 06, 01:07 PM
wrote:
> I have two wonderful rescue cats whom I have lovingly dubbed "Crazy"
> and "Lazy." Crazy was a stray that I took in after a co-worker found
> him and offered him up. I've had him for almost a year now. He's been
> to the vet, had his shots and, aside from being overweight (which is
> being addressed with diet and play), is perfectly healthy.
>
> But he's appropriately named, because he's driving me nuts.
>
> I suppose it's because he was a stray and had to take measures to
> ensure that his scent was covered in the "wild" suburban landscape, but
> Crazy paws at the area around the litterbox. All around the litterbox,
> which I keep in a spare shower stall (because there's absolutely
> nowhere else to keep it). I'm talking standing up on his hind legs and
> scraping (with his non-declawed front paws) at the tile until the noise
> makes my teeth itch. Did I mention that this generally happens at
> around 4 am? It's something akin to:
>
> Crazy (around litterbox): "*SCRAPESCRAPESCRAPESCRAPE*"
>
> Me: *waking up, angry, shouting groggily* "Quit that!"
>
> Crazy (chastized): "Mew?"
>
> *silence for half an hour, then repeat anew*
>
> At this point, I would kill a man for a decent night's sleep. I
> understand the logic behind it (burying his scent, survival mechanism,
> etc.) but that doesn't mean that I like it or that I know how to stop
> it. This cat does the same thing around his food dish (attempting to
> "hide" his leftovers from predators or competitors), which doesn't
> bother me so much because it's not as loud. As I said, moving the
> litterbox isn't an option (when I lived in my last apartment, the
> litter was in the laundry room and the pretty little freak scratched
> the heck out of the washer/dryer with this pawing) and he's perfectly
> healthy. My other cat doesn't do this, but she wasn't a stray (she was
> rescued from a bad situation). It doesn't help matters that Crazy does
> all of that pawing yet doesn't even bury his poop!
>
> Any suggestions at all would be welcome by both me and my employer, who
> doesn't believe "the cat kept me up all night" as an excuse for falling
> asleep on the job.
n
What about a wooden panel which you can take off the wall if the shower
shall be used and put it on again in the evening. (Two fastenings to
hang the panel on)

Would be less noisy.

Elizabeth
September 21st 06, 02:33 PM
wrote:
......
>Crazy paws at the area around the litterbox. All around the litterbox,
> which I keep in a spare shower stall (because there's absolutely
> nowhere else to keep it). I'm talking standing up on his hind legs and
> scraping (with his non-declawed front paws) at the tile until the noise
> makes my teeth itch. Did I mention that this generally happens at
> around 4 am?

just an off-the cuff suggestion: Have you tried larger, high-sided
litter box (so that Crazy scrapes at the high sides of the box itself?)
or even a large covered box?

My RugRat (also rescued from the wild) does that scraping bit too (just
not profoundly as Crazy seems to do)). RugRat does a LOT of scraping
at the sides of whatever litter box he uses, but the scraping seems to
me to be more about the residual smells of the cats who have used the
box before him (including the one box at my Mom's which had not been
used in probably 10 years, but still seemed to bear some of
FuzzBuster's residual marking). RugRat's scrapings of the sides are
done both before and after use, but most of it is before use. The
large high-sided litter boxes from Rubbermaid seem to work the best in
my household; they are best for my (possible) CRF kitty who pees alot,
and they are best for RugRat, cause he gets all those high sides to
scrape down! I found them at Petsmart.

Jennifer
September 21st 06, 04:02 PM
wrote:

> See, maybe I wasn't entirely clear, but the issue is that he scratches
> the *wall* - the tiled wall of the shower stall. I may try taping a
> small rug to it, but I doubt that will work in the long run. I'd
> rather break him of the habit than muffle the sound.

You said it's in a "spare shower stall"? Are there any doors between
this bathroom and your bed, like a bedroom door? If so, does Crazy
keep you up if you close the door to muffle the noise? It would mean
no cats in the bedroom at night, but that may be worth it for a decent
night's sleep.

For my part, I have a yowler. A loud, obnoxious, off-and-on
all-night-long yowler, but my husband and I both learned to sleep
through it after the first two weeks of misery ;) When we have guests,
we tell them to keep their bedroom door shut, and we provide earplugs.
Seriously. If he still keeps them awake, we keep the cats in our
bedroom at night, so there are two doors between the yowler and the
guests. That usually does the trick, though we get less sleep because
the cats spend all night chasing each other across our bed. Oh, the
price of being a good host!

--
Jennifer

--
Jennifer

Jennifer
September 21st 06, 04:11 PM
(Apologies if this goes through twice - I got an error the first time.)

wrote:

> See, maybe I wasn't entirely clear, but the issue is that he scratches
> the *wall* - the tiled wall of the shower stall. I may try taping a
> small rug to it, but I doubt that will work in the long run. I'd
> rather break him of the habit than muffle the sound.

You said it's in a "spare shower stall"? Are there any doors between
this bathroom and your bed, like a bedroom door? If so, does Crazy
keep you up if you close the door to muffle the noise? It would mean
no cats in the bedroom at night, but that may be worth it for a decent
night's sleep.

For my part, I have a yowler. A loud, obnoxious, off-and-on
all-night-long yowler, but my husband and I both learned to sleep
through it after the first two weeks of misery ;) When we have guests,
we tell them to keep their bedroom door shut, and we provide earplugs.
Seriously. If he still keeps them awake, we keep the cats in our
bedroom at night, so there are two doors between the yowler and the
guests. That usually does the trick, though we get less sleep because
the cats spend all night chasing each other across our bed. Oh, the
price of being a good host!

--
Jennifer

Lynne
September 21st 06, 06:32 PM
Jennifer wrote:
> the cats spend all night chasing each other across our bed.

Ha! This is an every night thing for me now that I have a new kitten
and a 3 year old cat. Add a dog into the mix and I'm a zombie!!

September 21st 06, 08:11 PM
> meeee wrote:
>
> One thing that works (partially) is tying some noisy, inconvenient things such as pan > lids or wire coathangers onto bits of string so that they hang over the area the cat
> scratches, so that when the cat scratches, the objects get in their way and also
> make lots of noise.

At the very least, that would be amusing. I might give it a shot on a
weekend when I don't have to be up early the next morning.

> Rhonda wrote:
>
> I think I would do all possible to find another place for the box. Is there any other
> corner where it will fit?

Unfortunately, no. I live with a roommate in a two-bedroom apartment,
so all of the "common" areas (laundry room, kitchen, hallway, etc.) are
off-limits for the litterbox. I really, really, REALLY don't want to
put it in the bedroom with me because the bedroom is carpeted and my
other cat, Lazy, is not always so cautious about where she squats and
occasionally pees half down the outside of the box. It also can't go
anywhere else in the (small) bathroom.

> meeee wrote:
> I was under the impression that he was outside the litter box, scratching at the shower
> walls.

That's right, that's what he's doing.

> It would depend whether this was his 'litter ritual' or whether he is just scratching for
> attention. Do yuo know whether he does this everytime he goes to the toilet, or just
> at night time?

Not every time, but not just at night. It happens maybe one out of
every five litter box trips.

> Rhonda wrote:
>
> What about double sided tape on all the shower walls? It shouldn't hurt the tile, and
> he will hate it.

I never thought of that. I will absolutely give that one a shot.

> Elizabeth wrote:
>
> Have you tried larger, high-sided litter box (so that Crazy scrapes at the high sides of
> the box itself?)

Yep. He's using a high-sided box right now, but I also used to have a
covered one. Same damn thing, the crazy beast. ;)

> Jennifer wrote:
> Are there any doors between this bathroom and your bed, like a bedroom door? If
> so, does Crazy keep you up if you close the door to muffle the noise?

Yes, there are doors and no, the scratching doesn't keep me up if I
close the door - the yowling from the other cat (Lazy) does. And if I
let Lazy in the bedroom, then I'm shutting her off from the
litterbox...

There are some good suggestions in here - I especially like the
double-sided tape.

Brenda
September 22nd 06, 04:12 AM
On 20 Sep 2006 11:23:05 -0700, wrote:

>I have two wonderful rescue cats whom I have lovingly dubbed "Crazy"
>and "Lazy." Crazy was a stray that I took in after a co-worker found
>him and offered him up. I've had him for almost a year now. He's been
>to the vet, had his shots and, aside from being overweight (which is
>being addressed with diet and play), is perfectly healthy.
>
>But he's appropriately named, because he's driving me nuts.
>
>I suppose it's because he was a stray and had to take measures to
>ensure that his scent was covered in the "wild" suburban landscape, but
>Crazy paws at the area around the litterbox. All around the litterbox,
>which I keep in a spare shower stall (because there's absolutely
>nowhere else to keep it). I'm talking standing up on his hind legs and
>scraping (with his non-declawed front paws) at the tile until the noise
>makes my teeth itch. Did I mention that this generally happens at
>around 4 am? It's something akin to:
>
>Crazy (around litterbox): "*SCRAPESCRAPESCRAPESCRAPE*"
>
>Me: *waking up, angry, shouting groggily* "Quit that!"
>
>Crazy (chastized): "Mew?"
>
>*silence for half an hour, then repeat anew*

I had this happen with one of my cats. I ended up getting a HUGE
storage container that is 16"x26"x15". The cat has to jump into it,
but does okay. I think because it's big enough for him to do his
business, and turn around to scratch, he doesn't scratch much at all
any more. It seems easier to clean, too because it's so big. Of course
I keep only about four inches of litter in the bottom, and when I
clean it once a day, not much builds up.

Anyway, he doesn't drive me crazy any more.
Brenda

meeee
September 26th 06, 02:20 PM
"Jennifer" > wrote in message
ups.com...
>
> wrote:
>
>> See, maybe I wasn't entirely clear, but the issue is that he scratches
>> the *wall* - the tiled wall of the shower stall. I may try taping a
>> small rug to it, but I doubt that will work in the long run. I'd
>> rather break him of the habit than muffle the sound.
>
> You said it's in a "spare shower stall"? Are there any doors between
> this bathroom and your bed, like a bedroom door? If so, does Crazy
> keep you up if you close the door to muffle the noise? It would mean
> no cats in the bedroom at night, but that may be worth it for a decent
> night's sleep.
>
> For my part, I have a yowler. A loud, obnoxious, off-and-on
> all-night-long yowler, but my husband and I both learned to sleep
> through it after the first two weeks of misery ;) When we have guests,
> we tell them to keep their bedroom door shut, and we provide earplugs.
> Seriously. If he still keeps them awake, we keep the cats in our
> bedroom at night, so there are two doors between the yowler and the
> guests. That usually does the trick, though we get less sleep because
> the cats spend all night chasing each other across our bed. Oh, the
> price of being a good host!
>
> --
> Jennifer
>
> --
> Jennifer
>

Lol I feel your pain!! I have a yowler too! Fortunately I have very
understanding neighbours, but I'm sure the people two doors down, who we
don't know, think I torture him or something.

meeee
September 26th 06, 02:30 PM
Well, if you put it in your room, try putting one of those plastic table
cloth covers under it. As he's doing it at odd times, and not every time as
a kind of 'litter ritual' if he does it in your room while the litterbox is
there, you can take some time to train him out of it. I know it will mean
less sleep for you, but if you try and distract him immediately as soon as
he starts scratching, ie pick him up for cuddles, throw one of his toys over
near him, that might help him break the habit. To me, it sounds like a habit
he used to have, realizes isn't necessary now (otherwise he'd do it
religiously) but still does out of half remembered habit, or in specific
(and unknown to hoomins) situations. Distracting him would work best if donw
immediately, and if he's completely removed from the scene. As for your
out-of-bos pee-er, I have a girl who does this, and 4 things are crucial to
her NOT doing it. 1. Not having to share a litterbox with another cat (if
you can get them one each; it may solve a lot of your probs. If possible get
3 and see if it changes; cats are very finicky and might prefer not having
to share at all) 2. Litterbox cleanliness. Again more boxes will help.
3.Keeping the box away from walls. This will help combat 'bum over edge'
syndrome. 4. Larger box. again, prevents bum over edge.

It sounds like you have a small house, which makes increasing the
litterboxes hard. Give it a go for a few weeks, as something as simple as
this might be the answer. I have 6 cats and had to work at getting a system
everyone's happy with. They seem to prefer poo-ing mostly in one box, and
wee-ing in the other. They also have probs if it's against a wall. Some
dislike pee-ing when the others are around, but family members will often
share a box, even if others are free. Go figure. just some suggestions, and
good luck finding a solution.
> wrote in message
ups.com...
>> meeee wrote:
>>
>> One thing that works (partially) is tying some noisy, inconvenient things
>> such as pan > lids or wire coathangers onto bits of string so that they
>> hang over the area the cat
>> scratches, so that when the cat scratches, the objects get in their way
>> and also
>> make lots of noise.
>
> At the very least, that would be amusing. I might give it a shot on a
> weekend when I don't have to be up early the next morning.
>
>> Rhonda wrote:
>>
>> I think I would do all possible to find another place for the box. Is
>> there any other
>> corner where it will fit?
>
> Unfortunately, no. I live with a roommate in a two-bedroom apartment,
> so all of the "common" areas (laundry room, kitchen, hallway, etc.) are
> off-limits for the litterbox. I really, really, REALLY don't want to
> put it in the bedroom with me because the bedroom is carpeted and my
> other cat, Lazy, is not always so cautious about where she squats and
> occasionally pees half down the outside of the box. It also can't go
> anywhere else in the (small) bathroom.
>
>> meeee wrote:
>> I was under the impression that he was outside the litter box, scratching
>> at the shower
>> walls.
>
> That's right, that's what he's doing.
>
>> It would depend whether this was his 'litter ritual' or whether he is
>> just scratching for
>> attention. Do yuo know whether he does this everytime he goes to the
>> toilet, or just
>> at night time?
>
> Not every time, but not just at night. It happens maybe one out of
> every five litter box trips.
>
>> Rhonda wrote:
>>
>> What about double sided tape on all the shower walls? It shouldn't hurt
>> the tile, and
>> he will hate it.
>
> I never thought of that. I will absolutely give that one a shot.
>
>> Elizabeth wrote:
>>
>> Have you tried larger, high-sided litter box (so that Crazy scrapes at
>> the high sides of
>> the box itself?)
>
> Yep. He's using a high-sided box right now, but I also used to have a
> covered one. Same damn thing, the crazy beast. ;)
>
>> Jennifer wrote:
>> Are there any doors between this bathroom and your bed, like a bedroom
>> door? If
>> so, does Crazy keep you up if you close the door to muffle the noise?
>
> Yes, there are doors and no, the scratching doesn't keep me up if I
> close the door - the yowling from the other cat (Lazy) does. And if I
> let Lazy in the bedroom, then I'm shutting her off from the
> litterbox...
>
> There are some good suggestions in here - I especially like the
> double-sided tape.
>