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September 28th 06, 07:10 AM
Hello everyone. I'm hoping someone can give insight into this
situation.

I have two cats, both females, both spayed, both roughly 9 years old.
And every year, as long as I can recall, it's the same old thing. My
little tiger girl is a perfectly sweet and happy cat in spring and
summer, and gets distinctly grouchier around this time of year and
through the rest of the winter. It's not bad enough that it's a big
concern, but I am curious about why it happens. What I notice is that
she gets more aggressive towards the other cat (who is about 4-6
months younger, and has lived with her essentially all her life).
During spring and summer there are almost no dominance displays,
hissing, spitting, or swatting, and they will curl up together and
groom each other. Come fall and winter, there'll be hiss/spit/swats
almost daily. But briefly... just the hiss/spit/swat and then she
walks away.

I've had some ideas for why this might be happening. They do get to
go out on harness, and have an enclosed patio that they get to go out
on. My first thought was that the little tiger girl was feeling
frustrated because she couldn't hang out outside as much as she wanted
to, since I would bring her in when it got dark out, since I was
worried about her finding some way out after night fell. But these
last few years, I have let her stay out to about the same time, even
after it got dark. And she still gets hissy. So, the only other big
change is that (due to how the townhome is situated) there is a lot
less sunlight that she can lounge in during this time of year, and
that this might affect her moods the way it does some people. Is this
remotely possible, and if it is, is there some (preferably relatively
inexpensive way) of fixing it? Full spectrum lights? The only other
seasonal change that I can think of is that the windows get closed for
the winter, and left open a lot in the summer. But I'm not sure why
that would matter.

Thanks for any thoughts or advice.

Rebecca

AZ Nomad
September 28th 06, 02:47 PM
On Wed, 27 Sep 2006 23:10:01 -0700, > wrote:


>Hello everyone. I'm hoping someone can give insight into this
>situation.

>I have two cats, both females, both spayed, both roughly 9 years old.
>And every year, as long as I can recall, it's the same old thing. My
>little tiger girl is a perfectly sweet and happy cat in spring and
>summer, and gets distinctly grouchier around this time of year and
>through the rest of the winter. It's not bad enough that it's a big

Cats are nocturnal. They are happiest when there's less sun.

September 28th 06, 04:19 PM
On Thu, 28 Sep 2006 13:47:43 GMT, AZ Nomad >
wrote:

>On Wed, 27 Sep 2006 23:10:01 -0700, > wrote:
>
>
>>Hello everyone. I'm hoping someone can give insight into this
>>situation.
>
>>I have two cats, both females, both spayed, both roughly 9 years old.
>>And every year, as long as I can recall, it's the same old thing. My
>>little tiger girl is a perfectly sweet and happy cat in spring and
>>summer, and gets distinctly grouchier around this time of year and
>>through the rest of the winter. It's not bad enough that it's a big
>
>Cats are nocturnal. They are happiest when there's less sun.

Actually, I think the general consensus is that they are most active
at dawn and dusk. But that has nothing to do with whether or not they
like sunlight. And given that this kitty is most easily found outside
by looking for the nearest patch of sun, it's apparent to me that she
is quite fond of it.

Rebecca

cybercat
September 28th 06, 04:28 PM
> wrote in message
...
> Hello everyone. I'm hoping someone can give insight into this
> situation.
>
> I have two cats, both females, both spayed, both roughly 9 years old.
> And every year, as long as I can recall, it's the same old thing. My
> little tiger girl is a perfectly sweet and happy cat in spring and
> summer, and gets distinctly grouchier around this time of year and
> through the rest of the winter. It's not bad enough that it's a big
> concern, but I am curious about why it happens. What I notice is that
> she gets more aggressive towards the other cat (who is about 4-6
> months younger, and has lived with her essentially all her life).
> During spring and summer there are almost no dominance displays,
> hissing, spitting, or swatting, and they will curl up together and
> groom each other. Come fall and winter, there'll be hiss/spit/swats
> almost daily. But briefly... just the hiss/spit/swat and then she
> walks away.

This might be a long shot, but I wonder if your little tiger girl has
a little arthritis that the cold weather bothers?

cybercat
September 28th 06, 05:59 PM
> wrote in message
...
> On Thu, 28 Sep 2006 13:47:43 GMT, AZ Nomad >
> wrote:
>
>>On Wed, 27 Sep 2006 23:10:01 -0700,
> wrote:
>>
>>
>>>Hello everyone. I'm hoping someone can give insight into this
>>>situation.
>>
>>>I have two cats, both females, both spayed, both roughly 9 years old.
>>>And every year, as long as I can recall, it's the same old thing. My
>>>little tiger girl is a perfectly sweet and happy cat in spring and
>>>summer, and gets distinctly grouchier around this time of year and
>>>through the rest of the winter. It's not bad enough that it's a big
>>
>>Cats are nocturnal. They are happiest when there's less sun.
>
> Actually, I think the general consensus is that they are most active
> at dawn and dusk.

Crepuscular. :) They are crepuscular.

September 29th 06, 06:15 AM
On 28 Sep 2006 17:28:28 +0200, "cybercat" >
wrote:

>
> wrote in message
...
>> Hello everyone. I'm hoping someone can give insight into this
>> situation.
>>
>> I have two cats, both females, both spayed, both roughly 9 years old.
>> And every year, as long as I can recall, it's the same old thing. My
>> little tiger girl is a perfectly sweet and happy cat in spring and
>> summer, and gets distinctly grouchier around this time of year and
>> through the rest of the winter. It's not bad enough that it's a big
>> concern, but I am curious about why it happens. What I notice is that
>> she gets more aggressive towards the other cat (who is about 4-6
>> months younger, and has lived with her essentially all her life).
>> During spring and summer there are almost no dominance displays,
>> hissing, spitting, or swatting, and they will curl up together and
>> groom each other. Come fall and winter, there'll be hiss/spit/swats
>> almost daily. But briefly... just the hiss/spit/swat and then she
>> walks away.
>
>This might be a long shot, but I wonder if your little tiger girl has
>a little arthritis that the cold weather bothers?
>
Hmm. That's a thought. It doesn't quite fit with the "happened as
long as I can recall", but it's possible that the closest memories are
shadowing the earlier ones. However, her activity level is still the
same, and that includes a lot of running, jumping, and climbing. Of
course, if she does have arthritis, that would probably make it hurt.

She does have a leaking mitral valve, but it's never seemed to bother
her. Idiopathic, of course, so the vet and I are just watching it to
see that it doesn't get worse.

Of course, it's possible too that the change is in the tuxedo cat, and
she's just reacting to challenges to her position. But that still
leaves me wondering why the tuxedo cat would get more dominant in the
winter, and give it back up in the summer months.

Rebecca