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October 1st 06, 05:29 PM
I currently have two cats, and am thinking about adding a dog to the
family. I've been reading up on how to do this properly, so that
everyone gets along and the cats don't wind up as lunch, but
everything I've been able to find concentrates on the dog side of the
equation. So I know the danger signs to watch for there, and how to
handle the dog so that I reinforce good behavior with the cats and
discourage bad. But what I can't seem to find is anything about the
cat side of the equation. How do I get resident cats to accept a dog,
and are there any signs I should watch out for that would indicate
that they just aren't going to get along with the dog? I know that
they will probably be hissy for a while, but how long is too long,
etc.?

Rebecca

22brix
October 1st 06, 08:35 PM
> wrote in message
...
>I currently have two cats, and am thinking about adding a dog to the
> family. I've been reading up on how to do this properly, so that
> everyone gets along and the cats don't wind up as lunch, but
> everything I've been able to find concentrates on the dog side of the
> equation. So I know the danger signs to watch for there, and how to
> handle the dog so that I reinforce good behavior with the cats and
> discourage bad. But what I can't seem to find is anything about the
> cat side of the equation. How do I get resident cats to accept a dog,
> and are there any signs I should watch out for that would indicate
> that they just aren't going to get along with the dog? I know that
> they will probably be hissy for a while, but how long is too long,
> etc.?
>
> Rebecca

I've had a mix of cats and dogs most of my life and for the most part
everybody has at least tolerated each other. I guess the main thing is that
I really worked with the dogs to make sure I was in control of the situation
and that I could really "read" the dog. All of the cats learned to tolerate
the dogs and some even to actively search the dog out. My current dog is
very mellow and disinterested in the cats--I've never seen her be aggressive
to the cats even though she doesn't care too much about them. When she was
younger I always supervised her time with the cats and didn't leave them
alone with her til I felt I could trust her. It also depends on the breed
and/or temperament of the dog. Some have a much higher prey instinct than
others and might never be trusted around cats. Also, a puppy can be easier
to train than an older dog.

I would try to work on some basic obedience with the dog before introducing
him to the family, keep the cats in a separate room for a bit. Let them
sniff each others stuff. Gradually introduce them, giving the dog treats
for good behavior (as in lying down quietly around the cats). Always
provide escape routes for the cats--a baby gate in the hallway, cat tree,
access to another room where the dog is not allowed. Each cat will come to
terms with the dog in their own time--some might warm up to the dog in a few
days, some may take weeks to months and some might never feel comfortable
with dogs. Cats can also do their own share of damage. I was taking care
of my mother's Boston Terrier who is very respectful of cats-- one of my
cats got him in the eye with a claw and he had quite a painful infection.

Basically just take it slow and be patient. It's great when they finally
start getting along!

Have fun, Bonnie

October 1st 06, 11:18 PM
On Sun, 1 Oct 2006 12:35:24 -0700, "22brix" >
wrote:

>
> wrote in message
...
>>I currently have two cats, and am thinking about adding a dog to the
>> family. I've been reading up on how to do this properly, so that
>> everyone gets along and the cats don't wind up as lunch, but
>> everything I've been able to find concentrates on the dog side of the
>> equation. So I know the danger signs to watch for there, and how to
>> handle the dog so that I reinforce good behavior with the cats and
>> discourage bad. But what I can't seem to find is anything about the
>> cat side of the equation. How do I get resident cats to accept a dog,
>> and are there any signs I should watch out for that would indicate
>> that they just aren't going to get along with the dog? I know that
>> they will probably be hissy for a while, but how long is too long,
>> etc.?
>>
>> Rebecca
>
>I've had a mix of cats and dogs most of my life and for the most part
>everybody has at least tolerated each other. I guess the main thing is that
>I really worked with the dogs to make sure I was in control of the situation
>and that I could really "read" the dog. All of the cats learned to tolerate
>the dogs and some even to actively search the dog out. My current dog is
>very mellow and disinterested in the cats--I've never seen her be aggressive
>to the cats even though she doesn't care too much about them. When she was
>younger I always supervised her time with the cats and didn't leave them
>alone with her til I felt I could trust her. It also depends on the breed
>and/or temperament of the dog. Some have a much higher prey instinct than
>others and might never be trusted around cats. Also, a puppy can be easier
>to train than an older dog.
>
>I would try to work on some basic obedience with the dog before introducing
>him to the family, keep the cats in a separate room for a bit. Let them
>sniff each others stuff. Gradually introduce them, giving the dog treats
>for good behavior (as in lying down quietly around the cats). Always
>provide escape routes for the cats--a baby gate in the hallway, cat tree,
>access to another room where the dog is not allowed. Each cat will come to
>terms with the dog in their own time--some might warm up to the dog in a few
>days, some may take weeks to months and some might never feel comfortable
>with dogs. Cats can also do their own share of damage. I was taking care
>of my mother's Boston Terrier who is very respectful of cats-- one of my
>cats got him in the eye with a claw and he had quite a painful infection.
>
>Basically just take it slow and be patient. It's great when they finally
>start getting along!
>
See, that's the kind of advice I have already. My concern is that one
of my cats, while getting along with her companion cat, is not at all
shy about going up to strange cats that get into her territory and
just whaling on them. So I am a little bit concerned that I could get
a perfectly nice dog that's fine with cats, and have a demon cat that
tries to terrorize it, which wouldn't be fair to the dog. She hasn't
had much contact with dogs, and may be fine with them. But then
again, she may not. So, nothing that I've found has told me how to
figure out if the cat has problems with the dog, instead of the other
way around.

Rebecca

meeee
October 2nd 06, 12:29 AM
Get a puppy. Preferably a small breed. The cats will train it for you....my
terrier is in awe of my cat, as she trained her young!!! Jasmine (cat) loves
my dog.....although the dog is quite scared of her, as she still thinks
Jasmine is bigger than she is, like when she was a puppy.
> wrote in message
...
>I currently have two cats, and am thinking about adding a dog to the
> family. I've been reading up on how to do this properly, so that
> everyone gets along and the cats don't wind up as lunch, but
> everything I've been able to find concentrates on the dog side of the
> equation. So I know the danger signs to watch for there, and how to
> handle the dog so that I reinforce good behavior with the cats and
> discourage bad. But what I can't seem to find is anything about the
> cat side of the equation. How do I get resident cats to accept a dog,
> and are there any signs I should watch out for that would indicate
> that they just aren't going to get along with the dog? I know that
> they will probably be hissy for a while, but how long is too long,
> etc.?
>
> Rebecca

meeee
October 2nd 06, 12:31 AM
> wrote in message
...
> On Sun, 1 Oct 2006 12:35:24 -0700, "22brix" >
> wrote:
>
>>
> wrote in message
...
>>>I currently have two cats, and am thinking about adding a dog to the
>>> family. I've been reading up on how to do this properly, so that
>>> everyone gets along and the cats don't wind up as lunch, but
>>> everything I've been able to find concentrates on the dog side of the
>>> equation. So I know the danger signs to watch for there, and how to
>>> handle the dog so that I reinforce good behavior with the cats and
>>> discourage bad. But what I can't seem to find is anything about the
>>> cat side of the equation. How do I get resident cats to accept a dog,
>>> and are there any signs I should watch out for that would indicate
>>> that they just aren't going to get along with the dog? I know that
>>> they will probably be hissy for a while, but how long is too long,
>>> etc.?
>>>
>>> Rebecca
>>
>>I've had a mix of cats and dogs most of my life and for the most part
>>everybody has at least tolerated each other. I guess the main thing is
>>that
>>I really worked with the dogs to make sure I was in control of the
>>situation
>>and that I could really "read" the dog. All of the cats learned to
>>tolerate
>>the dogs and some even to actively search the dog out. My current dog is
>>very mellow and disinterested in the cats--I've never seen her be
>>aggressive
>>to the cats even though she doesn't care too much about them. When she
>>was
>>younger I always supervised her time with the cats and didn't leave them
>>alone with her til I felt I could trust her. It also depends on the breed
>>and/or temperament of the dog. Some have a much higher prey instinct than
>>others and might never be trusted around cats. Also, a puppy can be
>>easier
>>to train than an older dog.
>>
>>I would try to work on some basic obedience with the dog before
>>introducing
>>him to the family, keep the cats in a separate room for a bit. Let them
>>sniff each others stuff. Gradually introduce them, giving the dog treats
>>for good behavior (as in lying down quietly around the cats). Always
>>provide escape routes for the cats--a baby gate in the hallway, cat tree,
>>access to another room where the dog is not allowed. Each cat will come
>>to
>>terms with the dog in their own time--some might warm up to the dog in a
>>few
>>days, some may take weeks to months and some might never feel comfortable
>>with dogs. Cats can also do their own share of damage. I was taking care
>>of my mother's Boston Terrier who is very respectful of cats-- one of my
>>cats got him in the eye with a claw and he had quite a painful infection.
>>
>>Basically just take it slow and be patient. It's great when they finally
>>start getting along!
>>
> See, that's the kind of advice I have already. My concern is that one
> of my cats, while getting along with her companion cat, is not at all
> shy about going up to strange cats that get into her territory and
> just whaling on them. So I am a little bit concerned that I could get
> a perfectly nice dog that's fine with cats, and have a demon cat that
> tries to terrorize it, which wouldn't be fair to the dog. She hasn't
> had much contact with dogs, and may be fine with them. But then
> again, she may not. So, nothing that I've found has told me how to
> figure out if the cat has problems with the dog, instead of the other
> way around.
>
> Rebecca

Maybe find a bit more robust breed instead of highly strung dogs....maybe a
puppy the same size as the cat instead of smaller. I'm thinking boxer or
spaniel type dog instead of terrier or poodle-ish dog. Friendly, positive
natured dogs might be better than sensitive, introverted types, perhaps.
Good luck!!

22brix
October 2nd 06, 01:53 AM
> wrote in message
...
> On Sun, 1 Oct 2006 12:35:24 -0700, "22brix" >
> wrote:
>
>>
> wrote in message
...
>>>I currently have two cats, and am thinking about adding a dog to the
>>> family. I've been reading up on how to do this properly, so that
>>> everyone gets along and the cats don't wind up as lunch, but
>>> everything I've been able to find concentrates on the dog side of the
>>> equation. So I know the danger signs to watch for there, and how to
>>> handle the dog so that I reinforce good behavior with the cats and
>>> discourage bad. But what I can't seem to find is anything about the
>>> cat side of the equation. How do I get resident cats to accept a dog,
>>> and are there any signs I should watch out for that would indicate
>>> that they just aren't going to get along with the dog? I know that
>>> they will probably be hissy for a while, but how long is too long,
>>> etc.?
>>>
>>> Rebecca
>>
>>I've had a mix of cats and dogs most of my life and for the most part
>>everybody has at least tolerated each other. I guess the main thing is
>>that
>>I really worked with the dogs to make sure I was in control of the
>>situation
>>and that I could really "read" the dog. All of the cats learned to
>>tolerate
>>the dogs and some even to actively search the dog out. My current dog is
>>very mellow and disinterested in the cats--I've never seen her be
>>aggressive
>>to the cats even though she doesn't care too much about them. When she
>>was
>>younger I always supervised her time with the cats and didn't leave them
>>alone with her til I felt I could trust her. It also depends on the breed
>>and/or temperament of the dog. Some have a much higher prey instinct than
>>others and might never be trusted around cats. Also, a puppy can be
>>easier
>>to train than an older dog.
>>
>>I would try to work on some basic obedience with the dog before
>>introducing
>>him to the family, keep the cats in a separate room for a bit. Let them
>>sniff each others stuff. Gradually introduce them, giving the dog treats
>>for good behavior (as in lying down quietly around the cats). Always
>>provide escape routes for the cats--a baby gate in the hallway, cat tree,
>>access to another room where the dog is not allowed. Each cat will come
>>to
>>terms with the dog in their own time--some might warm up to the dog in a
>>few
>>days, some may take weeks to months and some might never feel comfortable
>>with dogs. Cats can also do their own share of damage. I was taking care
>>of my mother's Boston Terrier who is very respectful of cats-- one of my
>>cats got him in the eye with a claw and he had quite a painful infection.
>>
>>Basically just take it slow and be patient. It's great when they finally
>>start getting along!
>>
> See, that's the kind of advice I have already. My concern is that one
> of my cats, while getting along with her companion cat, is not at all
> shy about going up to strange cats that get into her territory and
> just whaling on them. So I am a little bit concerned that I could get
> a perfectly nice dog that's fine with cats, and have a demon cat that
> tries to terrorize it, which wouldn't be fair to the dog. She hasn't
> had much contact with dogs, and may be fine with them. But then
> again, she may not. So, nothing that I've found has told me how to
> figure out if the cat has problems with the dog, instead of the other
> way around.
>
> Rebecca

I'm not sure you will know until you try! Do you know of anybody with a cat
friendly dog that you could borrow?! One of my cats was fairly aggressive
to my dogs when we first got her--the dogs basically just ignored her and my
larger dog would just raise her head out of harms way and go about her
business. Now they more or less ignore each other. Also a cat may react
differently to a dog than they would with another cat. I agree with the
other poster--a larger (not giant!) dog would probably do better with cat
terrorism than a tiny dog.

Bonnie

October 2nd 06, 04:50 AM
On Sun, 01 Oct 2006 23:31:43 GMT, "meeee"
> wrote:

>
> wrote in message
...
>> On Sun, 1 Oct 2006 12:35:24 -0700, "22brix" >
>> wrote:
>>
>>>
> wrote in message
...
>>>>I currently have two cats, and am thinking about adding a dog to the
>>>> family. I've been reading up on how to do this properly, so that
>>>> everyone gets along and the cats don't wind up as lunch, but
>>>> everything I've been able to find concentrates on the dog side of the
>>>> equation. So I know the danger signs to watch for there, and how to
>>>> handle the dog so that I reinforce good behavior with the cats and
>>>> discourage bad. But what I can't seem to find is anything about the
>>>> cat side of the equation. How do I get resident cats to accept a dog,
>>>> and are there any signs I should watch out for that would indicate
>>>> that they just aren't going to get along with the dog? I know that
>>>> they will probably be hissy for a while, but how long is too long,
>>>> etc.?
>>>>
>>>> Rebecca
>>>
>>>I've had a mix of cats and dogs most of my life and for the most part
>>>everybody has at least tolerated each other. I guess the main thing is
>>>that
>>>I really worked with the dogs to make sure I was in control of the
>>>situation
>>>and that I could really "read" the dog. All of the cats learned to
>>>tolerate
>>>the dogs and some even to actively search the dog out. My current dog is
>>>very mellow and disinterested in the cats--I've never seen her be
>>>aggressive
>>>to the cats even though she doesn't care too much about them. When she
>>>was
>>>younger I always supervised her time with the cats and didn't leave them
>>>alone with her til I felt I could trust her. It also depends on the breed
>>>and/or temperament of the dog. Some have a much higher prey instinct than
>>>others and might never be trusted around cats. Also, a puppy can be
>>>easier
>>>to train than an older dog.
>>>
>>>I would try to work on some basic obedience with the dog before
>>>introducing
>>>him to the family, keep the cats in a separate room for a bit. Let them
>>>sniff each others stuff. Gradually introduce them, giving the dog treats
>>>for good behavior (as in lying down quietly around the cats). Always
>>>provide escape routes for the cats--a baby gate in the hallway, cat tree,
>>>access to another room where the dog is not allowed. Each cat will come
>>>to
>>>terms with the dog in their own time--some might warm up to the dog in a
>>>few
>>>days, some may take weeks to months and some might never feel comfortable
>>>with dogs. Cats can also do their own share of damage. I was taking care
>>>of my mother's Boston Terrier who is very respectful of cats-- one of my
>>>cats got him in the eye with a claw and he had quite a painful infection.
>>>
>>>Basically just take it slow and be patient. It's great when they finally
>>>start getting along!
>>>
>> See, that's the kind of advice I have already. My concern is that one
>> of my cats, while getting along with her companion cat, is not at all
>> shy about going up to strange cats that get into her territory and
>> just whaling on them. So I am a little bit concerned that I could get
>> a perfectly nice dog that's fine with cats, and have a demon cat that
>> tries to terrorize it, which wouldn't be fair to the dog. She hasn't
>> had much contact with dogs, and may be fine with them. But then
>> again, she may not. So, nothing that I've found has told me how to
>> figure out if the cat has problems with the dog, instead of the other
>> way around.
>>
>> Rebecca
>
>Maybe find a bit more robust breed instead of highly strung dogs....maybe a
>puppy the same size as the cat instead of smaller. I'm thinking boxer or
>spaniel type dog instead of terrier or poodle-ish dog. Friendly, positive
>natured dogs might be better than sensitive, introverted types, perhaps.
>Good luck!!
>
Actually, I am thinking greyhound. We are generally a very laid-back
household, and I think it will be a good fit, as long as the cats like
the dog.

Rebecca

meeee
October 2nd 06, 10:07 PM
> wrote in message
...
> On Sun, 01 Oct 2006 23:31:43 GMT, "meeee"
> > wrote:
>
>>
> wrote in message
...
>>> On Sun, 1 Oct 2006 12:35:24 -0700, "22brix" >
>>> wrote:
>>>
>>>>
> wrote in message
...
>>>>>I currently have two cats, and am thinking about adding a dog to the
>>>>> family. I've been reading up on how to do this properly, so that
>>>>> everyone gets along and the cats don't wind up as lunch, but
>>>>> everything I've been able to find concentrates on the dog side of the
>>>>> equation. So I know the danger signs to watch for there, and how to
>>>>> handle the dog so that I reinforce good behavior with the cats and
>>>>> discourage bad. But what I can't seem to find is anything about the
>>>>> cat side of the equation. How do I get resident cats to accept a dog,
>>>>> and are there any signs I should watch out for that would indicate
>>>>> that they just aren't going to get along with the dog? I know that
>>>>> they will probably be hissy for a while, but how long is too long,
>>>>> etc.?
>>>>>
>>>>> Rebecca
>>>>
>>>>I've had a mix of cats and dogs most of my life and for the most part
>>>>everybody has at least tolerated each other. I guess the main thing is
>>>>that
>>>>I really worked with the dogs to make sure I was in control of the
>>>>situation
>>>>and that I could really "read" the dog. All of the cats learned to
>>>>tolerate
>>>>the dogs and some even to actively search the dog out. My current dog
>>>>is
>>>>very mellow and disinterested in the cats--I've never seen her be
>>>>aggressive
>>>>to the cats even though she doesn't care too much about them. When she
>>>>was
>>>>younger I always supervised her time with the cats and didn't leave them
>>>>alone with her til I felt I could trust her. It also depends on the
>>>>breed
>>>>and/or temperament of the dog. Some have a much higher prey instinct
>>>>than
>>>>others and might never be trusted around cats. Also, a puppy can be
>>>>easier
>>>>to train than an older dog.
>>>>
>>>>I would try to work on some basic obedience with the dog before
>>>>introducing
>>>>him to the family, keep the cats in a separate room for a bit. Let them
>>>>sniff each others stuff. Gradually introduce them, giving the dog
>>>>treats
>>>>for good behavior (as in lying down quietly around the cats). Always
>>>>provide escape routes for the cats--a baby gate in the hallway, cat
>>>>tree,
>>>>access to another room where the dog is not allowed. Each cat will come
>>>>to
>>>>terms with the dog in their own time--some might warm up to the dog in a
>>>>few
>>>>days, some may take weeks to months and some might never feel
>>>>comfortable
>>>>with dogs. Cats can also do their own share of damage. I was taking
>>>>care
>>>>of my mother's Boston Terrier who is very respectful of cats-- one of my
>>>>cats got him in the eye with a claw and he had quite a painful
>>>>infection.
>>>>
>>>>Basically just take it slow and be patient. It's great when they
>>>>finally
>>>>start getting along!
>>>>
>>> See, that's the kind of advice I have already. My concern is that one
>>> of my cats, while getting along with her companion cat, is not at all
>>> shy about going up to strange cats that get into her territory and
>>> just whaling on them. So I am a little bit concerned that I could get
>>> a perfectly nice dog that's fine with cats, and have a demon cat that
>>> tries to terrorize it, which wouldn't be fair to the dog. She hasn't
>>> had much contact with dogs, and may be fine with them. But then
>>> again, she may not. So, nothing that I've found has told me how to
>>> figure out if the cat has problems with the dog, instead of the other
>>> way around.
>>>
>>> Rebecca
>>
>>Maybe find a bit more robust breed instead of highly strung dogs....maybe
>>a
>>puppy the same size as the cat instead of smaller. I'm thinking boxer or
>>spaniel type dog instead of terrier or poodle-ish dog. Friendly, positive
>>natured dogs might be better than sensitive, introverted types, perhaps.
>>Good luck!!
>>
> Actually, I am thinking greyhound. We are generally a very laid-back
> household, and I think it will be a good fit, as long as the cats like
> the dog.
>
> Rebecca

Well, good luck then and I hope you enjoy your new family member!!

Lynne
October 2nd 06, 10:22 PM
wrote:
> See, that's the kind of advice I have already. My concern is that one
> of my cats, while getting along with her companion cat, is not at all
> shy about going up to strange cats that get into her territory and
> just whaling on them. So I am a little bit concerned that I could get
> a perfectly nice dog that's fine with cats, and have a demon cat that
> tries to terrorize it, which wouldn't be fair to the dog. She hasn't
> had much contact with dogs, and may be fine with them. But then
> again, she may not. So, nothing that I've found has told me how to
> figure out if the cat has problems with the dog, instead of the other
> way around.
>
> Rebecca

Trim your cat's claws regularly. My dog and older cat actually wrestle
in play, mouthing each other, etc. I've seen my cat's claws buried in
my dog's skin (who doesn't seem to notice) and I have had to unhook
her. I can't imagine the damage my cat could do to my dog if he
intended to hurt her. Thankfully that's not the case, but I have
become very adept at trimming kitty claws and that helps reduce the
play fighting scars.