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janet hodson
October 3rd 06, 01:43 AM
I have had my cat for 3 years and I love her dearly. I now have a new puppy
and am having a hard times. The pup wants to play but my cat runs away and
the pup chases her. I have to keep them in seperate rooms and it makes it
hard to housebreak my pup because I hate to confine my cat to one room. Any
suggestions?

Lynne
October 3rd 06, 03:21 AM
janet hodson wrote:
> I have had my cat for 3 years and I love her dearly. I now have a new puppy
> and am having a hard times. The pup wants to play but my cat runs away and
> the pup chases her. I have to keep them in seperate rooms and it makes it
> hard to housebreak my pup because I hate to confine my cat to one room. Any
> suggestions?

ask on rec.pets.dog.behavior

My first thought is that you should keep the puppy on a leash around
the kitty. They need to get used to each other and separating them is
not a long term solution. You need to train the puppy not to chase the
cat. Feed the cat first, give the cat treats first, let the pup know
the cat is higher in the pack order than the pup is. And be patient.
They will probably end up tolerating each other at the very least, or
maybe even as best friends. Never leave them alone together
unsupervised until you are absolutely certain neither will harm the
other.

Here is my dog when she was a pup, napping with my 3 year old, Rudy:
http://fototime.com/E93D8A0D2F86C13/orig.jpg

Charlie Wilkes
October 3rd 06, 04:08 AM
On Tue, 03 Oct 2006 00:43:35 GMT, "janet hodson"
> wrote:

>I have had my cat for 3 years and I love her dearly. I now have a new puppy
>and am having a hard times. The pup wants to play but my cat runs away and
>the pup chases her. I have to keep them in seperate rooms and it makes it
>hard to housebreak my pup because I hate to confine my cat to one room. Any
>suggestions?
>
You can gradually teach the puppy how to get along with the cat. One
technique might be to cut some cold cuts into little strips and get
cat and puppy interested in those at the same time.

More generally, I've had pretty good luck getting dogs to befriend
each other and cats by getting them to focus their attention on me
instead of each other, and by lavishly praising the aggressive dog
whenever it can maintain the slightest composure in the presence of
the antagonistic cat or other dog.

DON'T yell at the puppy, yank on his leash or get mad at him when he
gets worked up about the cat. That is practically guaranteed to make
matters worse by reinforcing an antagonistic relationship.

I'd be very skeptical of this "pack order" business. It's based on
some murky fieldwork from the early 20th Century, which has been
repudiated by more systematic research conducted under the auspices of
Yale.

Charlie

October 3rd 06, 06:57 AM
On Tue, 03 Oct 2006 00:43:35 GMT, "janet hodson"
> wrote:

>I have had my cat for 3 years and I love her dearly. I now have a new puppy
>and am having a hard times. The pup wants to play but my cat runs away and
>the pup chases her. I have to keep them in seperate rooms and it makes it
>hard to housebreak my pup because I hate to confine my cat to one room. Any
>suggestions?
>
I'm considering getting a dog, so I've been doing some research. This
is a general summing up of what I've found.

Number one. The cat needs safe, puppy-free spots that she can reach.
Give her a room of her own, with her food, water, and litter box. You
can put up a baby gate so that she can get in and the dog can't,
either by raising the gate a bit so that she can scoot under it if the
dog is larger, or failing that hopefully she can go over the gate.

Number two. Reward and reinforce appropriate behavior when the pup is
around the cat. Reward the puppy for ignoring the cat, for allowing
the cat to be around it without chasing it, etc. Essentially, you
want the puppy to associate being calm around the cat with really good
things happening.

Number three. When you aren't around to supervise, confine the pup to
an area where he'll be safe, but separate from the cat. Personally, I
think it's best if you can do this in such a way that they can see
each other. That way they can get to know each other a bit more, but
you don't have to worry about bloodshed when you aren't there to
supervise.

Rebecca