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View Full Version : Deaf or Blind Kitten or YoungCat Adoption


Gary1631
October 5th 06, 04:36 AM
Is there a way that I can find a deaf or blind kitten or young cat to
adopt within about 35 miles (or so) of where I live?

Matthew
October 5th 06, 04:37 AM
petfinder.com
"Gary1631" > wrote in message
ups.com...
> Is there a way that I can find a deaf or blind kitten or young cat to
> adopt within about 35 miles (or so) of where I live?
>

Gail
October 5th 06, 12:58 PM
go to www.petfinder.com and write in your zip code. It will come up with
kittens/cats in shelters near you. They will say if the cat is blind or has
any special medical problems.
Gail
"Gary1631" > wrote in message
ups.com...
> Is there a way that I can find a deaf or blind kitten or young cat to
> adopt within about 35 miles (or so) of where I live?
>

mlbriggs
October 5th 06, 06:53 PM
On Wed, 04 Oct 2006 20:36:05 -0700, Gary1631 wrote:

> Is there a way that I can find a deaf or blind kitten or young cat to
> adopt within about 35 miles (or so) of where I live?



I am curious why you specifically want a deaf or blind kitten? MLB

Gary1631
October 5th 06, 08:59 PM
mlbriggs wrote:
> On Wed, 04 Oct 2006 20:36:05 -0700, Gary1631 wrote:
>
> > Is there a way that I can find a deaf or blind kitten or young cat to
> > adopt within about 35 miles (or so) of where I live?
>
>
> I am curious why you specifically want a deaf or blind kitten? MLB

I want to raise a special needs cat/kitten because:

1) I want to save a cat/kitten who might otherwise be destroyed.
2) I have had to overcome a personal disability myself.
3) I am very patient and determined and have a great love of
cats.
4) I believe a blind or deaf cat/kitten can live a long, full and
happy life.
5) There was a blind lady who lived next door to my grandmother
in Missouri whom we visited each summer for 1-2 weeks. She was
wonderful and we talked a great deal. She could do most things a
sighted person could do but she just had to do them differently. I
found her courageous, intelligent and she had a fantastic sense of
humor. She saw her disability as a challenge and just wanted to be
treated like everyone else. She just had to do a number of things a
little differently.
6) I took an adult education course a number of years ago to learn
American Sign Language. I didn't really have a need for it but have
always been fascinated by codes, ciphers, computer languages, etc. By
taking the course, I also learned about the origins of the signs and
I've seen programs about deaf people on TV. I know that's not much
in the way of personal experience with the deaf but did communicate
with my cat (her name was Copper because of an underlying copper
colored coat) using a number of gestures as well as voice
communications. She really got to be quite good at it (or I should say
"we" got to be quite good at it). I learned a great deal from her
by closely watching her movements and "signs".
7) Although I never thought I would ever want a cat other than
"Copper", after 2 years of living with only tropical fish, I really
want to (replace isn't the right word) get another one. I really
need the companionship and I really want a blind or deaf cat who would
be rejected by or require too much effort and patience by other people.
8) I'm not perfect either but I have done and can do a lot more
than people believe I can do when they give me a chance. (I think the
term "special needs" is a great way to put it.)

I wish the web sites would allow me to search on special needs rather
than just age, gender, breed, color, etc.

Matthew
October 5th 06, 09:05 PM
Gary I stand proud to send you a internet handshake and a pat on the pack
for you noble actions ;-)
Welcome to the group please feel free to joins us here anytime and also in
rec.pets.cats.anecdotes if your news server carries it


"Gary1631" > wrote in message
ups.com...
>
> mlbriggs wrote:
>> On Wed, 04 Oct 2006 20:36:05 -0700, Gary1631 wrote:
>>
>> > Is there a way that I can find a deaf or blind kitten or young cat to
>> > adopt within about 35 miles (or so) of where I live?
>>
>>
>> I am curious why you specifically want a deaf or blind kitten? MLB
>
> I want to raise a special needs cat/kitten because:
>
> 1) I want to save a cat/kitten who might otherwise be destroyed.
> 2) I have had to overcome a personal disability myself.
> 3) I am very patient and determined and have a great love of
> cats.
> 4) I believe a blind or deaf cat/kitten can live a long, full and
> happy life.
> 5) There was a blind lady who lived next door to my grandmother
> in Missouri whom we visited each summer for 1-2 weeks. She was
> wonderful and we talked a great deal. She could do most things a
> sighted person could do but she just had to do them differently. I
> found her courageous, intelligent and she had a fantastic sense of
> humor. She saw her disability as a challenge and just wanted to be
> treated like everyone else. She just had to do a number of things a
> little differently.
> 6) I took an adult education course a number of years ago to learn
> American Sign Language. I didn't really have a need for it but have
> always been fascinated by codes, ciphers, computer languages, etc. By
> taking the course, I also learned about the origins of the signs and
> I've seen programs about deaf people on TV. I know that's not much
> in the way of personal experience with the deaf but did communicate
> with my cat (her name was Copper because of an underlying copper
> colored coat) using a number of gestures as well as voice
> communications. She really got to be quite good at it (or I should say
> "we" got to be quite good at it). I learned a great deal from her
> by closely watching her movements and "signs".
> 7) Although I never thought I would ever want a cat other than
> "Copper", after 2 years of living with only tropical fish, I really
> want to (replace isn't the right word) get another one. I really
> need the companionship and I really want a blind or deaf cat who would
> be rejected by or require too much effort and patience by other people.
> 8) I'm not perfect either but I have done and can do a lot more
> than people believe I can do when they give me a chance. (I think the
> term "special needs" is a great way to put it.)
>
> I wish the web sites would allow me to search on special needs rather
> than just age, gender, breed, color, etc.
>

Elle
October 5th 06, 11:42 PM
Gary, thanks for the elaboration. I too was curious, mostly
because I think people want to be safe, and there have been
instances nationwide in the past of people with abusive
intentions towards cats adopting them and... I trust you
know the rest. Special needs cats seem especially
vulnerable.

I suggest you get your name on the list of various animal
rescue organizations as being interested only in a special
needs cat, per your description. Based on my experience in
animal rescue (limited though it is) I imagine something
will come up within a year. I am a candidate for looking
after a kitten the organization has in its care who is
likely going to have cataract surgery soon. Also, another
couple in my organization recently adopted an older, blind
cat. This cat is very sweet and even gets along well with
the few other cats (and one big dog?) in the house. Uses her
(or the others') litter boxes with no problem. Does not
fight but walks away when one of the other cats throws a
little hissy fit.

Thanks for being willing to take on a special needs cat.

mlbriggs
October 6th 06, 06:36 AM
On Thu, 05 Oct 2006 12:59:21 -0700, Gary1631 wrote:

>
> mlbriggs wrote:
>> On Wed, 04 Oct 2006 20:36:05 -0700, Gary1631 wrote:
>>
>> > Is there a way that I can find a deaf or blind kitten or young cat to
>> > adopt within about 35 miles (or so) of where I live?
>>
>>
>> I am curious why you specifically want a deaf or blind kitten? MLB
>
> I want to raise a special needs cat/kitten because:
>
> 1) I want to save a cat/kitten who might otherwise be destroyed.
> 2) I have had to overcome a personal disability myself.
> 3) I am very patient and determined and have a great love of
> cats.
> 4) I believe a blind or deaf cat/kitten can live a long, full and
> happy life.
> 5) There was a blind lady who lived next door to my grandmother
> in Missouri whom we visited each summer for 1-2 weeks. She was
> wonderful and we talked a great deal. She could do most things a
> sighted person could do but she just had to do them differently. I
> found her courageous, intelligent and she had a fantastic sense of
> humor. She saw her disability as a challenge and just wanted to be
> treated like everyone else. She just had to do a number of things a
> little differently.
> 6) I took an adult education course a number of years ago to learn
> American Sign Language. I didn't really have a need for it but have
> always been fascinated by codes, ciphers, computer languages, etc. By
> taking the course, I also learned about the origins of the signs and
> I've seen programs about deaf people on TV. I know that's not much
> in the way of personal experience with the deaf but did communicate
> with my cat (her name was Copper because of an underlying copper
> colored coat) using a number of gestures as well as voice
> communications. She really got to be quite good at it (or I should say
> "we" got to be quite good at it). I learned a great deal from her
> by closely watching her movements and "signs".
> 7) Although I never thought I would ever want a cat other than
> "Copper", after 2 years of living with only tropical fish, I really
> want to (replace isn't the right word) get another one. I really
> need the companionship and I really want a blind or deaf cat who would
> be rejected by or require too much effort and patience by other people.
> 8) I'm not perfect either but I have done and can do a lot more
> than people believe I can do when they give me a chance. (I think the
> term "special needs" is a great way to put it.)
>
> I wish the web sites would allow me to search on special needs rather
> than just age, gender, breed, color, etc.


Thanks for your reply and I wish you good luck so you can continue your
efforts to help one who needs it most. Perhaps your local Veterinarians
could be of help or your local Humane Societies.
MLB

MaryL
October 7th 06, 01:37 AM
"Gary1631" > wrote in message
ups.com...
>
> mlbriggs wrote:
>> On Wed, 04 Oct 2006 20:36:05 -0700, Gary1631 wrote:
>>
>> > Is there a way that I can find a deaf or blind kitten or young cat to
>> > adopt within about 35 miles (or so) of where I live?
>>
>>
>> I am curious why you specifically want a deaf or blind kitten? MLB
>
> I want to raise a special needs cat/kitten because:
>
> 1) I want to save a cat/kitten who might otherwise be destroyed.
> 2) I have had to overcome a personal disability myself.
> 3) I am very patient and determined and have a great love of
> cats.
> 4) I believe a blind or deaf cat/kitten can live a long, full and
> happy life.
> 5) There was a blind lady who lived next door to my grandmother
> in Missouri whom we visited each summer for 1-2 weeks. She was
> wonderful and we talked a great deal. She could do most things a
> sighted person could do but she just had to do them differently. I
> found her courageous, intelligent and she had a fantastic sense of
> humor. She saw her disability as a challenge and just wanted to be
> treated like everyone else. She just had to do a number of things a
> little differently.
> 6) I took an adult education course a number of years ago to learn
> American Sign Language. I didn't really have a need for it but have
> always been fascinated by codes, ciphers, computer languages, etc. By
> taking the course, I also learned about the origins of the signs and
> I've seen programs about deaf people on TV. I know that's not much
> in the way of personal experience with the deaf but did communicate
> with my cat (her name was Copper because of an underlying copper
> colored coat) using a number of gestures as well as voice
> communications. She really got to be quite good at it (or I should say
> "we" got to be quite good at it). I learned a great deal from her
> by closely watching her movements and "signs".
> 7) Although I never thought I would ever want a cat other than
> "Copper", after 2 years of living with only tropical fish, I really
> want to (replace isn't the right word) get another one. I really
> need the companionship and I really want a blind or deaf cat who would
> be rejected by or require too much effort and patience by other people.
> 8) I'm not perfect either but I have done and can do a lot more
> than people believe I can do when they give me a chance. (I think the
> term "special needs" is a great way to put it.)
>
> I wish the web sites would allow me to search on special needs rather
> than just age, gender, breed, color, etc.
>

Gary,

Thank you very much for writing this. I was also concerned when I saw your
original message because you didn't say "why."

I adopted a wonderful blind cat, Duffy. I first saw his picture on
www.petfinder.com. You can search by zip code, city, etc., but not by
characteristics. For that, you would need to read through the various
lists. However, you may be able to find a special-needs kitty just by
calling animal shelters or by checking with your veterinarian. There are
many blind and/or deaf cats available, and shelters would probably be
delighted to find someone who is eager to adopt for the reasons you cited.

You can see some pictures of Duffy in the albums under my signature. He is
pure delight and can do almost *anything.* He is loving, happy, and
fearless; he makes cute little "myrrrup, myrrup" sounds as he prances around
the house.

MaryL

Photos of Duffy and Holly: >'o'<
Duffy: http://tinyurl.com/cslwf
Holly: http://tinyurl.com/9t68o
Duffy and Holly together: http://tinyurl.com/8b47e

NickC
October 7th 06, 08:12 AM
MaryL wrote on 07 Oct 2006:

> http://tinyurl.com/cslwf

Mary, I love your climbers and poles. Are they common in the US? I
haven't seen anything like them here in Australia; I'd love to get a
couple like that.

Actually, has anyone on the web come across a simple how-to to make
your own? Can't be that hard, but I imagine there are some 'gotchas'
to watch out for in picking carpet types, scratch material, etc.

--
Nick

Gail Futoran
October 7th 06, 01:11 PM
"NickC" > wrote in message
...
> MaryL wrote on 07 Oct 2006:
>
>> http://tinyurl.com/cslwf
>
> Mary, I love your climbers and poles. Are they common in the US? I
> haven't seen anything like them here in Australia; I'd love to get a
> couple like that.
>
> Actually, has anyone on the web come across a simple how-to to make
> your own? Can't be that hard, but I imagine there are some 'gotchas'
> to watch out for in picking carpet types, scratch material, etc.
>
> --
> Nick

We made climbing posts for our cats using thick cardboard rolls that come
inside carpet. Our local Home Depot gave them to us for the asking, but
carpet stores might also be willing to give them away. To attach the rolls
to a wood base we used cheap pieces of lumber that fit snug inside the
rolls. There are probably better ways of doing that, however. For carpet we
used a tight weave that seems to be working out fine. Some we bought, some
we were given by friends who were redoing their carpet. We also bought a
hemp rope and twisted that around several posts, stapling them in place.

As far as availability of the commercial climbers, they're easy to find the
the States, in chain stores like Petsmart & Petco, in local pet stores,
online, and at pet shows. They can be quite expensive.

Gail F.
Owned by Lao Ma, Ephiny, Minya, Melosa

MaryL
October 7th 06, 01:20 PM
"NickC" > wrote in message
...
> MaryL wrote on 07 Oct 2006:
>
>> http://tinyurl.com/cslwf
>
> Mary, I love your climbers and poles. Are they common in the US? I
> haven't seen anything like them here in Australia; I'd love to get a
> couple like that.
>
> Actually, has anyone on the web come across a simple how-to to make
> your own? Can't be that hard, but I imagine there are some 'gotchas'
> to watch out for in picking carpet types, scratch material, etc.
>
> --
> Nick

Hi Nick,

I ordered my two cat trees from www.createacatcondo.com. This is a small
family-owned company that builds to the buyer's specifications. They are
located in the US, but you might want to look at their site because it is
interactive and can help you decide what "features" you would want. The
trees are made of solid wood. I think it's important for the trees and
other climbing poles to be very sturdy, and this one definitely is. I had
everything covered in carpet except for one pole that is sisal-covered.
Some people prefer plain wood, but I wanted lots of climbing surfaces for
Duffy. It's important for him to have texture to grab since he can't see.
I also used the beds with a raised "lip" all around, and he will often curl
up in one and take a nice nap.

A friend built the climbing pole mounted beside the computer hutch, and I
also had him place another pole across the front of the hutch at the top
because Duffy loves to roll around and hang over the top edge. I was afraid
he could slide off and fall if I didn't have some sort of stabilizing bar.
The man who did this for me did a wonderful job of ensuring that there are
no nails or sharp protruding objects -- again, very important when cats will
be scrambling up and down.

There are a number of sites on the Internet that have plans for
do-it-yourself cat furniture projects. Here are two:
http://amby.com/cat_site/declaw.html#build-it
http://www.cat-tree-plans.com/

I hope this helps.
MaryL

blaze116
December 14th 06, 03:28 AM
If you are still looking, I can help you with a special kitten like this. Blaze

Is there a way that I can find a deaf or blind kitten or young cat to
adopt within about 35 miles (or so) of where I live?