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KelTX
October 7th 06, 01:52 AM
Hi all,
I joined this site tonight in an effort to get some answers. The problem: I
have a 7 year old cat (really not sure of her age) that has a nasty ear
infection. The problem is she was a feral cat I "tamed" over time and she
will not let anyone touch her but me. I have no idea what to do. My Vet won't
treat feral cats. I tried to clean her ear with some alchohol and she went
berzerk. Now she's wincing her eye on the side of the bad ear. She has been
spayed (from trapping about 5 years ago) and I'm sure I could never get her
in a carrier to have her treated. Even if the Vet would treat her.

Any ideas on what I can do to treat this? Will a Vet give me Rx for her food?
There is no way that cat will let me put anything in her ear. Especially
after the alchohol incident earlier.

Any advice is appreciated,

Thanks
KelTX

Gail
October 7th 06, 02:22 AM
Alcohol was the worst thing you could put in her ear. Can you call another
vet who will treat feral cats?
Gail
"KelTX" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
> Hi all,
> I joined this site tonight in an effort to get some answers. The problem:
> I
> have a 7 year old cat (really not sure of her age) that has a nasty ear
> infection. The problem is she was a feral cat I "tamed" over time and she
> will not let anyone touch her but me. I have no idea what to do. My Vet
> won't
> treat feral cats. I tried to clean her ear with some alchohol and she went
> berzerk. Now she's wincing her eye on the side of the bad ear. She has
> been
> spayed (from trapping about 5 years ago) and I'm sure I could never get
> her
> in a carrier to have her treated. Even if the Vet would treat her.
>
> Any ideas on what I can do to treat this? Will a Vet give me Rx for her
> food?
> There is no way that cat will let me put anything in her ear. Especially
> after the alchohol incident earlier.
>
> Any advice is appreciated,
>
> Thanks
> KelTX
>

KelTX
October 7th 06, 02:37 AM
Well, it was a cotton swab with a little alcohol. Not much. I barely got it
on her at all really, so don't worry. I'm not that much of an idiot.

I have no idea really about another vet. I've never been to another vet
before. My understanding is that most vets won't treat feral cats.

Would an ear mite solution help maybe?

This is horrible. I have no idea what I'm going to do. I hate seeing her in
pain.

Gail wrote:
>Alcohol was the worst thing you could put in her ear. Can you call another
>vet who will treat feral cats?
>Gail
>> Hi all,
>> I joined this site tonight in an effort to get some answers. The problem:
>[quoted text clipped - 19 lines]
>> Thanks
>> KelTX

Rhonda
October 7th 06, 03:12 AM
Hi there,

Where are you located? Maybe someone knows of a vet in your area that
works with ferals.

I would call the Humane Society and independent animal rescue groups and
see if they can recommend a vet. We have a rescue group here that works
with ferals and they have references for good vets that they work with.

Once you find the vet, they might give you a sedative to put in her
food. One of the former feral kittens we found a home for -- his owner
had the vet prescribe sedatives for whenever he had to be transported.

I had to get him into a carrier last year without the sedative. If you
want to try this -- we had him in a closet and we blocked off all ways
for him to run. We put a divider (big cardboard poster) in the middle of
the closet, then put the carrier open in the closet door with a towel
over the back of the carrier to make it dark inside, and another poster
over the carrier so he couldn't jump over. Don't know if that makes
sense, but the only way for him to escape was into the dark carrier. I
had someone move the barrier in the closet closer to him which of course
freaked him out, and he ran into the carrier and I quickly shut the door.

You might have to get a little creative based on where she's hiding.

With one of our former ferals, she just trusts me. I can put her in the
bottom half of a carrier and then have my sig. other quickly help put on
the top and door. I've also had carriers stand on end, then sort of
dumped the cat in the top. The trick is to not let them see the carrier
in advance, back over to it with the cat facing another direction, then
quickly swing around and dump. Do this in a small room with the door
closed if you can.

The vets who work with ferals know how to handle them. If they are truly
wild, the vet here sedates them while in the carrier.

You know your kitty needs a vet and I think you'll be able to find one
and get her there. It might take some effort and planning on your part,
but I'm sure you can do it.

Let us know what happens,

Rhonda

KelTX wrote:
> Hi all,
> I joined this site tonight in an effort to get some answers. The problem: I
> have a 7 year old cat (really not sure of her age) that has a nasty ear
> infection. The problem is she was a feral cat I "tamed" over time and she
> will not let anyone touch her but me. I have no idea what to do. My Vet won't
> treat feral cats. I tried to clean her ear with some alchohol and she went
> berzerk. Now she's wincing her eye on the side of the bad ear. She has been
> spayed (from trapping about 5 years ago) and I'm sure I could never get her
> in a carrier to have her treated. Even if the Vet would treat her.
>
> Any ideas on what I can do to treat this? Will a Vet give me Rx for her food?
> There is no way that cat will let me put anything in her ear. Especially
> after the alchohol incident earlier.
>
> Any advice is appreciated,
>
> Thanks
> KelTX
>

Gail
October 7th 06, 03:14 AM
Yes, vets do treat feral cats. You don't know what the problem is and that's
why it is difficult to treat her with over the counter things. Maybe you
could swab inside her ear and bring it to the vet to be analzyed to see if
it is ear mites.
Gail
"KelTX" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
> Well, it was a cotton swab with a little alcohol. Not much. I barely got
> it
> on her at all really, so don't worry. I'm not that much of an idiot.
>
> I have no idea really about another vet. I've never been to another vet
> before. My understanding is that most vets won't treat feral cats.
>
> Would an ear mite solution help maybe?
>
> This is horrible. I have no idea what I'm going to do. I hate seeing her
> in
> pain.
>
> Gail wrote:
>>Alcohol was the worst thing you could put in her ear. Can you call another
>>vet who will treat feral cats?
>>Gail
>>> Hi all,
>>> I joined this site tonight in an effort to get some answers. The
>>> problem:
>>[quoted text clipped - 19 lines]
>>> Thanks
>>> KelTX
>

KelTX
October 7th 06, 04:41 AM
Thanks Rhonda.

I'm in Dallas, TX. I'm going to call my vet in the morning (they are only
open until noon on saturdays). I'm going to ask him once again to treat her.
If he won't, then I'll call the SPCA or Humane Society and see if they can
give me an idea of where to go which won't be until Monday most likely. The
thought of her having to wait that long for treatment is bothering me though.


She's an outdoor only cat, has never even attempted to come in the house, and
I don't own a pet carrier. I'm going to ask my neighbor if I can borrow his
though. I'll attempt to get her in it once I find out where I'm taking her.
I've pretty much resolved myself to just taking her instead of trying to get
the medication and doing this myself. If I have to, I'll throw a blanket over
her in the yard and catch her that way. I'll figure out something! This is so
stressful. I feel so bad for her.

I'll let you know what the outcome is. Wish me luck and that I come out of
this without getting ripped to shreds!

Rhonda wrote:
>Hi there,
>
>Where are you located? Maybe someone knows of a vet in your area that
>works with ferals.
>
>I would call the Humane Society and independent animal rescue groups and
>see if they can recommend a vet. We have a rescue group here that works
>with ferals and they have references for good vets that they work with.
>
>Once you find the vet, they might give you a sedative to put in her
>food. One of the former feral kittens we found a home for -- his owner
>had the vet prescribe sedatives for whenever he had to be transported.
>
>I had to get him into a carrier last year without the sedative. If you
>want to try this -- we had him in a closet and we blocked off all ways
>for him to run. We put a divider (big cardboard poster) in the middle of
>the closet, then put the carrier open in the closet door with a towel
>over the back of the carrier to make it dark inside, and another poster
>over the carrier so he couldn't jump over. Don't know if that makes
>sense, but the only way for him to escape was into the dark carrier. I
>had someone move the barrier in the closet closer to him which of course
>freaked him out, and he ran into the carrier and I quickly shut the door.
>
>You might have to get a little creative based on where she's hiding.
>
>With one of our former ferals, she just trusts me. I can put her in the
>bottom half of a carrier and then have my sig. other quickly help put on
>the top and door. I've also had carriers stand on end, then sort of
>dumped the cat in the top. The trick is to not let them see the carrier
>in advance, back over to it with the cat facing another direction, then
>quickly swing around and dump. Do this in a small room with the door
>closed if you can.
>
>The vets who work with ferals know how to handle them. If they are truly
>wild, the vet here sedates them while in the carrier.
>
>You know your kitty needs a vet and I think you'll be able to find one
>and get her there. It might take some effort and planning on your part,
>but I'm sure you can do it.
>
>Let us know what happens,
>
>Rhonda
>
>> Hi all,
>> I joined this site tonight in an effort to get some answers. The problem: I
>[quoted text clipped - 14 lines]
>> Thanks
>> KelTX

Rhonda
October 7th 06, 06:28 AM
Hello again,

I found a rescue group in Dallas that works with ferals, here's their
website -- http://www.1-800-save-a-pet.com/adoption_rescue/71119.html.
You might shoot them off an email tonight to see if they have someone
that might help tomorrow.

Here's another one: http://www.kittico.org/.

This is a list of vets in general, some with Saturday hours listed.
Maybe another vet would be more experienced than your normal vet with
ferals: http://www.vetworld.com/vetusa/texas.html

Good luck, let me know how she does. I'm sure both of you will live
through this!

When you bring her home, do you have a room you might keep her in? You
are probably going to need to give her medicine a couple of times a day.
After her trip to the vet, if you let her loose outside again she may
disappear for awhile. If you have somewhere to keep her, it would be
much easier on you and you'd be certain she gets the medicine.

Hope it goes well,

Rhonda



KelTX wrote:
> Thanks Rhonda.
>
> I'm in Dallas, TX. I'm going to call my vet in the morning (they are only
> open until noon on saturdays). I'm going to ask him once again to treat her.
> If he won't, then I'll call the SPCA or Humane Society and see if they can
> give me an idea of where to go which won't be until Monday most likely. The
> thought of her having to wait that long for treatment is bothering me though.
>
>
> She's an outdoor only cat, has never even attempted to come in the house, and
> I don't own a pet carrier. I'm going to ask my neighbor if I can borrow his
> though. I'll attempt to get her in it once I find out where I'm taking her.
> I've pretty much resolved myself to just taking her instead of trying to get
> the medication and doing this myself. If I have to, I'll throw a blanket over
> her in the yard and catch her that way. I'll figure out something! This is so
> stressful. I feel so bad for her.
>
> I'll let you know what the outcome is. Wish me luck and that I come out of
> this without getting ripped to shreds!
>
> Rhonda wrote:
>
>>Hi there,
>>
>>Where are you located? Maybe someone knows of a vet in your area that
>>works with ferals.
>>
>>I would call the Humane Society and independent animal rescue groups and
>>see if they can recommend a vet. We have a rescue group here that works
>>with ferals and they have references for good vets that they work with.
>>
>>Once you find the vet, they might give you a sedative to put in her
>>food. One of the former feral kittens we found a home for -- his owner
>>had the vet prescribe sedatives for whenever he had to be transported.
>>
>>I had to get him into a carrier last year without the sedative. If you
>>want to try this -- we had him in a closet and we blocked off all ways
>>for him to run. We put a divider (big cardboard poster) in the middle of
>>the closet, then put the carrier open in the closet door with a towel
>>over the back of the carrier to make it dark inside, and another poster
>>over the carrier so he couldn't jump over. Don't know if that makes
>>sense, but the only way for him to escape was into the dark carrier. I
>>had someone move the barrier in the closet closer to him which of course
>>freaked him out, and he ran into the carrier and I quickly shut the door.
>>
>>You might have to get a little creative based on where she's hiding.
>>
>>With one of our former ferals, she just trusts me. I can put her in the
>>bottom half of a carrier and then have my sig. other quickly help put on
>>the top and door. I've also had carriers stand on end, then sort of
>>dumped the cat in the top. The trick is to not let them see the carrier
>>in advance, back over to it with the cat facing another direction, then
>>quickly swing around and dump. Do this in a small room with the door
>>closed if you can.
>>
>>The vets who work with ferals know how to handle them. If they are truly
>>wild, the vet here sedates them while in the carrier.
>>
>>You know your kitty needs a vet and I think you'll be able to find one
>>and get her there. It might take some effort and planning on your part,
>>but I'm sure you can do it.
>>
>>Let us know what happens,
>>
>>Rhonda
>>
>>
>>>Hi all,
>>>I joined this site tonight in an effort to get some answers. The problem: I
>>
>>[quoted text clipped - 14 lines]
>>
>>>Thanks
>>>KelTX
>>
>

guynoir
October 7th 06, 07:28 PM
KelTX wrote:
> Thanks Rhonda.

>
> I'll let you know what the outcome is. Wish me luck and that I come out of
> this without getting ripped to shreds!
>

Put the carrier (with its door open) and the cat in a room where the
carrier is the only cozy hiding place. Put a towel or newspapers in
the bottom of the carrier. The cat will go into the carrier on his
own. This works better if you condition him for a few days or weeks
before you close the door on him.

My vets always give me Clavamox for a weeks worth of treatment (for
various infections and wounds). So far, the cats have always gotten
better. I mix the Clavamox with a small amount of canned food.

John Kimmel



In the desert
I saw a creature, naked, bestial,
Who, squatting upon the ground,
Held his heart in his hands,
And ate of it.
I said, "Is it good, friend?"
"It is bitter -- bitter", he answered,
"But I like it
Because it is bitter,
And because it is my heart."

KelTX via CatKB.com
October 8th 06, 12:21 AM
YAY!! My Vet called me back this morning. We went through the description of
the infection, etc. I managed to swab the ear (barely) and went down early
for him to take a look. Yep, ear mites with pus, infection the whole shabang.
He sends me home with a Rx for Tresaderm which treats the mites plus has an
antibiotic for the infection. I came home and she was miserable. Just laying
on the deck. She took one look at the white bottle and bolted. I gave it a
little while, put out a can of tuna. Worked like a charm. I got her on the
railing, let her eat the tuna while I petted her (hiding the bottle in my
other hand with the top off). Pretty soon, she seems relaxed enough and I
just grabbed her, put the drops in and that was that! She kinda made a low
growling noise, gave the the "look" and then kept eating the tuna! I couldn't
believe it. So, I have to bribe with tuna every day for the next 7 days.
Which I'm sure she'll get hip to I'm sure, but then I'll switch to some nasty
wet cat food she likes or something.

WHEW! I also wormed her today too, so she's had a bad day. Is sleeping
peacefully under a tree in the backyard. Still looks miserable, but at least
she's on the road to recovery.

Thank you all for your help! I really, REALLY appreciate it.

And thanks for those links Rhonda. These are going to come in handy.

Million thanks ya'll!

Kel

Rhonda wrote:
>Hello again,
>
>I found a rescue group in Dallas that works with ferals, here's their
>website -- http://www.1-800-save-a-pet.com/adoption_rescue/71119.html.
>You might shoot them off an email tonight to see if they have someone
>that might help tomorrow.
>
>Here's another one: http://www.kittico.org/.
>
>This is a list of vets in general, some with Saturday hours listed.
>Maybe another vet would be more experienced than your normal vet with
>ferals: http://www.vetworld.com/vetusa/texas.html
>
>Good luck, let me know how she does. I'm sure both of you will live
>through this!
>
>When you bring her home, do you have a room you might keep her in? You
>are probably going to need to give her medicine a couple of times a day.
>After her trip to the vet, if you let her loose outside again she may
>disappear for awhile. If you have somewhere to keep her, it would be
>much easier on you and you'd be certain she gets the medicine.
>
>Hope it goes well,
>
>Rhonda
>
>> Thanks Rhonda.
>>
>[quoted text clipped - 66 lines]
>>>>Thanks
>>>>KelTX

--
Message posted via CatKB.com
http://www.catkb.com/Uwe/Forums.aspx/cat-health/200610/1

Gail
October 8th 06, 12:29 AM
Sooo happy he was able to give her meds for the ear infection!!
Gail
"KelTX via CatKB.com" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> YAY!! My Vet called me back this morning. We went through the description
> of
> the infection, etc. I managed to swab the ear (barely) and went down early
> for him to take a look. Yep, ear mites with pus, infection the whole
> shabang.
> He sends me home with a Rx for Tresaderm which treats the mites plus has
> an
> antibiotic for the infection. I came home and she was miserable. Just
> laying
> on the deck. She took one look at the white bottle and bolted. I gave it a
> little while, put out a can of tuna. Worked like a charm. I got her on the
> railing, let her eat the tuna while I petted her (hiding the bottle in my
> other hand with the top off). Pretty soon, she seems relaxed enough and I
> just grabbed her, put the drops in and that was that! She kinda made a low
> growling noise, gave the the "look" and then kept eating the tuna! I
> couldn't
> believe it. So, I have to bribe with tuna every day for the next 7 days.
> Which I'm sure she'll get hip to I'm sure, but then I'll switch to some
> nasty
> wet cat food she likes or something.
>
> WHEW! I also wormed her today too, so she's had a bad day. Is sleeping
> peacefully under a tree in the backyard. Still looks miserable, but at
> least
> she's on the road to recovery.
>
> Thank you all for your help! I really, REALLY appreciate it.
>
> And thanks for those links Rhonda. These are going to come in handy.
>
> Million thanks ya'll!
>
> Kel
>
> Rhonda wrote:
>>Hello again,
>>
>>I found a rescue group in Dallas that works with ferals, here's their
>>website -- http://www.1-800-save-a-pet.com/adoption_rescue/71119.html.
>>You might shoot them off an email tonight to see if they have someone
>>that might help tomorrow.
>>
>>Here's another one: http://www.kittico.org/.
>>
>>This is a list of vets in general, some with Saturday hours listed.
>>Maybe another vet would be more experienced than your normal vet with
>>ferals: http://www.vetworld.com/vetusa/texas.html
>>
>>Good luck, let me know how she does. I'm sure both of you will live
>>through this!
>>
>>When you bring her home, do you have a room you might keep her in? You
>>are probably going to need to give her medicine a couple of times a day.
>>After her trip to the vet, if you let her loose outside again she may
>>disappear for awhile. If you have somewhere to keep her, it would be
>>much easier on you and you'd be certain she gets the medicine.
>>
>>Hope it goes well,
>>
>>Rhonda
>>
>>> Thanks Rhonda.
>>>
>>[quoted text clipped - 66 lines]
>>>>>Thanks
>>>>>KelTX
>
> --
> Message posted via CatKB.com
> http://www.catkb.com/Uwe/Forums.aspx/cat-health/200610/1
>

kitkat via CatKB.com
October 8th 06, 01:04 AM
I don't know anything about ear infections - but regarding subduing / getting
your cat in to a carrier:

perhaps lay a towel on your lap and motion to your cat to jump up on your lap.
quickly wrap the towel around him/her. without the ability to move any of
his/her legs you should be able to transport him as needed.

and this may seem stupid - but what exactly is a feral cat? just a "wild
stray"?

--
Message posted via CatKB.com
http://www.catkb.com/Uwe/Forums.aspx/cat-health/200610/1

Annie Wxill
October 8th 06, 05:16 AM
"KelTX via CatKB.com" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
.... > He sends me home with a Rx for Tresaderm which treats the mites plus
has an antibiotic for the infection. ...> WHEW! I also wormed her today too,
so she's had a bad day. ...>
> Kel

Kel,
Ask your vet about Revolution. It is a monthly application applied between
the shoulder blades. It treats fleas, ear mites and some kinds of worms.
It will not treat the infection, however, so I suppose you'll need to
continue the Tresaderm for now.
But, you might want to start Revolution when the infection clears up to make
sure the ear mites don't return.

Annie

Rhonda
October 8th 06, 05:31 AM
It's a cat that was not raised around humans. A cat not socialized to
humans after about 2 months old can be tough to change.

Rhonda

kitkat via CatKB.com wrote:
> and this may seem stupid - but what exactly is a feral cat? just a "wild
> stray"?
>

Rhonda
October 8th 06, 05:33 AM
KelTX via CatKB.com wrote:
>I gave it a
> little while, put out a can of tuna. Worked like a charm. I got her on the
> railing, let her eat the tuna while I petted her (hiding the bottle in my
> other hand with the top off). Pretty soon, she seems relaxed enough and I
> just grabbed her, put the drops in and that was that!

Way to go! Sounds like you solved the problem perfectly. She's going to
feel so much better now. She will thank you some day.

I'm glad you cared enough about this cat to go through all of this.

Give her a scritch from me, if she's currently accepting scritches...

Rhonda

Lynne
October 8th 06, 02:49 PM
Rhonda wrote:
> It's a cat that was not raised around humans. A cat not socialized to
> humans after about 2 months old can be tough to change.
>
> Rhonda

I'm so glad I didn't know that when I took in Rudy, a feral from a long
line of ferals, at the age of 4 months. He was TERRIFIED of humans and
completely freaked out by the whole experience of capture,
transportation (2 hour car ride home from the woods) and the
introduction to our home. There were times when I thought I must be
crazy to have taken him in, but after just a few weeks he started to
calm down and warm up to us. Now he is very affectionate. He is also
very easy going and loves company, as well as dogs.

My little kitten, Levi, also came from a feral colony. He was
abandoned and hand raised, so he loves humans, but there is something
different about him. He's very very bold and unafraid. I love that
about him, though.

Lynne
October 8th 06, 03:11 PM
KelTX via CatKB.com wrote:
> YAY!! My Vet called me back this morning. We went through the description of
> the infection, etc. I managed to swab the ear (barely) and went down early
> for him to take a look. Yep, ear mites with pus, infection the whole shabang.
> He sends me home with a Rx for Tresaderm which treats the mites plus has an
> antibiotic for the infection. I came home and she was miserable. Just laying
> on the deck. She took one look at the white bottle and bolted. I gave it a
> little while, put out a can of tuna. Worked like a charm. I got her on the
> railing, let her eat the tuna while I petted her (hiding the bottle in my
> other hand with the top off). Pretty soon, she seems relaxed enough and I
> just grabbed her, put the drops in and that was that! She kinda made a low
> growling noise, gave the the "look" and then kept eating the tuna! I couldn't
> believe it. So, I have to bribe with tuna every day for the next 7 days.
> Which I'm sure she'll get hip to I'm sure, but then I'll switch to some nasty
> wet cat food she likes or something.
>
> WHEW! I also wormed her today too, so she's had a bad day. Is sleeping
> peacefully under a tree in the backyard. Still looks miserable, but at least
> she's on the road to recovery.
>
> Thank you all for your help! I really, REALLY appreciate it.
>
> And thanks for those links Rhonda. These are going to come in handy.
>
> Million thanks ya'll!
>
> Kel

I love that you are caring for this girl. GREAT job getting her the
meds she needs. Does she stay in your yard, or does she ever
disappear? Have you considered trying to capture her and get her
spayed? I would fear damaging your relationship with her by doing
that, but on the other hand, I'd hate to see her have kittens. Perhaps
if you decide to get her spayed, you might also decide to try bringing
her into your home. If so, I'd start some litter box training outside
first. She may welcome a clean place to "go", but if not, I'd be
reluctant to try bringing her indoors.

I hope she is feeling better soon!

October 9th 06, 06:30 AM
Say, sounds like she feels safe and secure for the first time in
probably awhile~!
Good Going~!
:)

Lynne wrote:
> KelTX via CatKB.com wrote:
> > YAY!! My Vet called me back this morning. We went through the description of
> > the infection, etc. I managed to swab the ear (barely) and went down early
> > for him to take a look. Yep, ear mites with pus, infection the whole shabang.
> > He sends me home with a Rx for Tresaderm which treats the mites plus has an
> > antibiotic for the infection. I came home and she was miserable. Just laying
> > on the deck. She took one look at the white bottle and bolted. I gave it a
> > little while, put out a can of tuna. Worked like a charm. I got her on the
> > railing, let her eat the tuna while I petted her (hiding the bottle in my
> > other hand with the top off). Pretty soon, she seems relaxed enough and I
> > just grabbed her, put the drops in and that was that! She kinda made a low
> > growling noise, gave the the "look" and then kept eating the tuna! I couldn't
> > believe it. So, I have to bribe with tuna every day for the next 7 days.
> > Which I'm sure she'll get hip to I'm sure, but then I'll switch to some nasty
> > wet cat food she likes or something.
> >
> > WHEW! I also wormed her today too, so she's had a bad day. Is sleeping
> > peacefully under a tree in the backyard. Still looks miserable, but at least
> > she's on the road to recovery.
> >
> > Thank you all for your help! I really, REALLY appreciate it.
> >
> > And thanks for those links Rhonda. These are going to come in handy.
> >
> > Million thanks ya'll!
> >
> > Kel
>
> I love that you are caring for this girl. GREAT job getting her the
> meds she needs. Does she stay in your yard, or does she ever
> disappear? Have you considered trying to capture her and get her
> spayed? I would fear damaging your relationship with her by doing
> that, but on the other hand, I'd hate to see her have kittens. Perhaps
> if you decide to get her spayed, you might also decide to try bringing
> her into your home. If so, I'd start some litter box training outside
> first. She may welcome a clean place to "go", but if not, I'd be
> reluctant to try bringing her indoors.
>
> I hope she is feeling better soon!

KelTX via CatKB.com
October 10th 06, 10:07 PM
UPDATE!

She's doing much better. Still a little wonky earred (as I'm calling it) but
at least the medicine is working. She's also getting so much better about
letting me handle her to treat her. SHOCK! There is a really weird looking
lump above her eye, which looks to be swelling of some sort. I'm going to
continue administering the mite/antibiotic meds and keep an eye on that lump.
If it doesn't go away in the next day or so with the ear meds, I'm going to
take her in. I think now I've built up enough trust to grab her and put her
in a crate if I had to.

Although, getting her out at a Vets office will be a whole nuther story!


Lynne wrote:
>> It's a cat that was not raised around humans. A cat not socialized to
>> humans after about 2 months old can be tough to change.
>>
>> Rhonda
>
>I'm so glad I didn't know that when I took in Rudy, a feral from a long
>line of ferals, at the age of 4 months. He was TERRIFIED of humans and
>completely freaked out by the whole experience of capture,
>transportation (2 hour car ride home from the woods) and the
>introduction to our home. There were times when I thought I must be
>crazy to have taken him in, but after just a few weeks he started to
>calm down and warm up to us. Now he is very affectionate. He is also
>very easy going and loves company, as well as dogs.
>
>My little kitten, Levi, also came from a feral colony. He was
>abandoned and hand raised, so he loves humans, but there is something
>different about him. He's very very bold and unafraid. I love that
>about him, though.

--
Message posted via CatKB.com
http://www.catkb.com/Uwe/Forums.aspx/cat-health/200610/1

cybercat
October 10th 06, 10:19 PM
"KelTX via CatKB.com" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> UPDATE!
>
> She's doing much better.

Good to hear!

Rhonda
October 13th 06, 05:43 AM
Great news! That's good that she's doing so much better and even letting
you handle her more.

What happened with the lump?

Hope that went away and she's still feeling good.

Rhonda

KelTX via CatKB.com wrote:
> UPDATE!
>
> She's doing much better. Still a little wonky earred (as I'm calling it) but
> at least the medicine is working. She's also getting so much better about
> letting me handle her to treat her. SHOCK! There is a really weird looking
> lump above her eye, which looks to be swelling of some sort. I'm going to
> continue administering the mite/antibiotic meds and keep an eye on that lump.
> If it doesn't go away in the next day or so with the ear meds, I'm going to
> take her in. I think now I've built up enough trust to grab her and put her
> in a crate if I had to.

KelTX via CatKB.com
October 20th 06, 10:42 PM
Sorry, it's taken me so long to reply.
The lump..well, I have no idea what it was, but the day after I posted that I
came home to her on the deck with a giant wet spot on her head. I go out
there, she kind of shyed away. I sat down, got her near and OMG I almost
gagged! The lump evidently was some sort of pus filled infection. She had
scratched it or rubbed it on something and it burst. Yeah, gross. It was
nasty. I put some peroxide on a cotton ball, she let me rub it on there. I
couldn't even see where the yucky stuff had come from! So weird! Anyway, it
had dried up by the next morning and was just a little scab.

All better here now! She brought me a mouse missing it's head yesterday
morning. Left it on the back door mat. She loves me.



Rhonda wrote:
>Great news! That's good that she's doing so much better and even letting
>you handle her more.
>
>What happened with the lump?
>
>Hope that went away and she's still feeling good.
>
>Rhonda
>
>> UPDATE!
>>
>[quoted text clipped - 6 lines]
>> take her in. I think now I've built up enough trust to grab her and put her
>> in a crate if I had to.

--
Message posted via http://www.catkb.com

October 21st 06, 04:55 AM
When I was dealing with a very pregnant feral cat that had ear mites and
other problems, I threw a heavy think coat over her in the yard and rolled
her up. I kept her in the garage until she was well. I had to put the
gooky stuff in her ears twice a day so I would throw one of those big bath
towels that are almost as big as a blanket and roll her. Find her head and
tighten the towel with hopefully nothing sticking out besides her head. It
was trial and error and we had some pretty wild times. She really hated me
for quite some time but eventually she got easier to handle.
Like any animal, they sense your fear so (I know it's easier said than
done!) if you can be calm it helps. When you are terrified, they are too.
If the cat will let you put stuff in her ears while she eats, she's not all
that wild. A cat who has never been handled would never do that.
Good luck.
Jean

Rhonda
October 21st 06, 08:41 AM
Yikes, I'll bet seeing that stuff on her head was a shock.

I'm glad the cat is still letting you get close enough to treat wounds
like that. She sounds like she's yours forever...

Rhonda

KelTX via CatKB.com wrote:
> Sorry, it's taken me so long to reply.
> The lump..well, I have no idea what it was, but the day after I posted that I
> came home to her on the deck with a giant wet spot on her head. I go out
> there, she kind of shyed away. I sat down, got her near and OMG I almost
> gagged! The lump evidently was some sort of pus filled infection. She had
> scratched it or rubbed it on something and it burst. Yeah, gross. It was
> nasty. I put some peroxide on a cotton ball, she let me rub it on there. I
> couldn't even see where the yucky stuff had come from! So weird! Anyway, it
> had dried up by the next morning and was just a little scab.
>
> All better here now! She brought me a mouse missing it's head yesterday
> morning. Left it on the back door mat. She loves me.
>
>
>
> Rhonda wrote:
>
>>Great news! That's good that she's doing so much better and even letting
>>you handle her more.
>>
>>What happened with the lump?
>>
>>Hope that went away and she's still feeling good.
>>
>>Rhonda
>>
>>
>>>UPDATE!
>>>
>>
>>[quoted text clipped - 6 lines]
>>
>>>take her in. I think now I've built up enough trust to grab her and put her
>>>in a crate if I had to.
>>
>