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MoMo via CatKB.com
October 11th 06, 02:06 AM
Hello. My cat was put on the presciption c/d diet after having a blockage
this past weekend. The problem is, he won't eat it. I feel so terrible. He
is just sitting in the kitchen by his food bowl waiting for his old food. It
has been 2 days now and he just will not eat although I know that he is
starving. What do I do? Can I mix the c/d in with some of his old wet food
and slowly wean him off the old food? Please help. Lot's of tears flowing
over here :(

--
Message posted via http://www.catkb.com

Gail
October 11th 06, 02:09 AM
Your cat needs to ear. Not eating can kill him (causes fatty liver disease).
I would mix it with his old food and try weaning him onto the CD. If he
still continues not to eat it, speak with your vet.
Gail
"MoMo via CatKB.com" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
> Hello. My cat was put on the presciption c/d diet after having a blockage
> this past weekend. The problem is, he won't eat it. I feel so terrible.
> He
> is just sitting in the kitchen by his food bowl waiting for his old food.
> It
> has been 2 days now and he just will not eat although I know that he is
> starving. What do I do? Can I mix the c/d in with some of his old wet
> food
> and slowly wean him off the old food? Please help. Lot's of tears
> flowing
> over here :(
>
> --
> Message posted via http://www.catkb.com
>

Matthew
October 11th 06, 02:11 AM
"MoMo via CatKB.com" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
> Hello. My cat was put on the presciption c/d diet after having a blockage
> this past weekend. The problem is, he won't eat it. I feel so terrible.
> He
> is just sitting in the kitchen by his food bowl waiting for his old food.
> It
> has been 2 days now and he just will not eat although I know that he is
> starving. What do I do? Can I mix the c/d in with some of his old wet
> food
> and slowly wean him off the old food? Please help. Lot's of tears
> flowing
> over here :(
>
> --
> Message posted via http://www.catkb.com
>
Put a little of the new food down

Rub some on his mouth

IMO it is a battle of wills now a cat will not starve himself to get what
he wants. he will eat

You can get some baby food flavored that a cat would like maybe some
yogurt

MoMo via CatKB.com
October 11th 06, 02:22 AM
Thank you Gail! I just fed him by mixing the two foods, he ate and then went
to his litter box and had the biggest pee he has had since his blockage. I
feel much better now and thank you again for your advice :)

Gail wrote:
>Your cat needs to ear. Not eating can kill him (causes fatty liver disease).
>I would mix it with his old food and try weaning him onto the CD. If he
>still continues not to eat it, speak with your vet.
>Gail
>> Hello. My cat was put on the presciption c/d diet after having a blockage
>> this past weekend. The problem is, he won't eat it. I feel so terrible.
>[quoted text clipped - 7 lines]
>> flowing
>> over here :(

--
Message posted via http://www.catkb.com

Gail
October 11th 06, 02:26 AM
I would also ask your vet if you can feed him the Science Diet Feline
Maintenance food (found in pet stores). Also the CD canned food comes in 3
different flavors. My cat (who also has blockages) eats only the fish
flavored one. He also eats the UR food (sold in vet's offices).
Gail
"MoMo via CatKB.com" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
> Thank you Gail! I just fed him by mixing the two foods, he ate and then
> went
> to his litter box and had the biggest pee he has had since his blockage.
> I
> feel much better now and thank you again for your advice :)
>
> Gail wrote:
>>Your cat needs to ear. Not eating can kill him (causes fatty liver
>>disease).
>>I would mix it with his old food and try weaning him onto the CD. If he
>>still continues not to eat it, speak with your vet.
>>Gail
>>> Hello. My cat was put on the presciption c/d diet after having a
>>> blockage
>>> this past weekend. The problem is, he won't eat it. I feel so
>>> terrible.
>>[quoted text clipped - 7 lines]
>>> flowing
>>> over here :(
>
> --
> Message posted via http://www.catkb.com
>

Gail
October 11th 06, 02:27 AM
I disagree. I think some cats will not eat and will develop fatty liver
disease before they do so.
Gail
"Matthew" > wrote in message
.. .
>
> "MoMo via CatKB.com" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]
>> Hello. My cat was put on the presciption c/d diet after having a
>> blockage
>> this past weekend. The problem is, he won't eat it. I feel so terrible.
>> He
>> is just sitting in the kitchen by his food bowl waiting for his old food.
>> It
>> has been 2 days now and he just will not eat although I know that he is
>> starving. What do I do? Can I mix the c/d in with some of his old wet
>> food
>> and slowly wean him off the old food? Please help. Lot's of tears
>> flowing
>> over here :(
>>
>> --
>> Message posted via http://www.catkb.com
>>
> Put a little of the new food down
>
> Rub some on his mouth
>
> IMO it is a battle of wills now a cat will not starve himself to get
> what he wants. he will eat
>
> You can get some baby food flavored that a cat would like maybe some
> yogurt
>

MoMo via CatKB.com
October 11th 06, 02:37 AM
I was also very concerned about his not eating because he is also on Clavamox
for this week and I cannot imagine how his stomach feels taking antibiodics
on an empty stomach. I am going to call my vet first thing tomorrow morning
and hopefully he will say that it is okay to keep mixing the foods until I
can wean him off the old stuff for good. Also Gail, I have not really talked
to other cat owners that have suffered through blockages. Is there a time
frame in which he may be more likely to re-block? I am walking around here
in a panic thinking that he is going to block again at any minute. Is there a
chance he may never re-block? Any advice you can add to this would be
extremely appreciated. Thank you again.

Gail wrote:
>I disagree. I think some cats will not eat and will develop fatty liver
>disease before they do so.
>Gail
>
>>> Hello. My cat was put on the presciption c/d diet after having a
>>> blockage
>[quoted text clipped - 18 lines]
>> You can get some baby food flavored that a cat would like maybe some
>> yogurt

--
Message posted via CatKB.com
http://www.catkb.com/Uwe/Forums.aspx/cat-health/200610/1

Gail
October 11th 06, 02:41 AM
I don't know about a time frame, but once a cat has blocked, the probability
increases that he may block again. Provide plenty of water dishes and keep
track of his urinating.
Gail
"MoMo via CatKB.com" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
>I was also very concerned about his not eating because he is also on
>Clavamox
> for this week and I cannot imagine how his stomach feels taking
> antibiodics
> on an empty stomach. I am going to call my vet first thing tomorrow
> morning
> and hopefully he will say that it is okay to keep mixing the foods until I
> can wean him off the old stuff for good. Also Gail, I have not really
> talked
> to other cat owners that have suffered through blockages. Is there a time
> frame in which he may be more likely to re-block? I am walking around
> here
> in a panic thinking that he is going to block again at any minute. Is
> there a
> chance he may never re-block? Any advice you can add to this would be
> extremely appreciated. Thank you again.
>
> Gail wrote:
>>I disagree. I think some cats will not eat and will develop fatty liver
>>disease before they do so.
>>Gail
>>
>>>> Hello. My cat was put on the presciption c/d diet after having a
>>>> blockage
>>[quoted text clipped - 18 lines]
>>> You can get some baby food flavored that a cat would like maybe some
>>> yogurt
>
> --
> Message posted via CatKB.com
> http://www.catkb.com/Uwe/Forums.aspx/cat-health/200610/1
>

Gail
October 11th 06, 02:46 AM
It is especially crucial to realize that the cat is at risk for
re-blocking for a good week or two from the time of discharge. This is
because the irritation syndrome that led to blocking in the first place is
still continuing and as long as the episode continues, blocking is a
possibility.

At home, the same straining and bloody urine will still be produced.
It is important for the owner to be aware of urine volume being produced and
of bladder size, if possible. Any loss of appetite or vomiting should be
reported to the veterinarian at once. If there is any concern about
reblocking, the veterinarian can determine fairly easily if the cat has
re-blocked.

Most cats recovery uneventfully and most do not need continuing
medication after they have recovered. Some cats, especially if they have
blocked before, will require on-going treatment.

Occasionally the bladder over-stretches while it is blocked and is
permanently damaged. Such cats require special medication to help them
contract and empty their bladders normally. This is unusual but one should
be aware of the possibility.

FUTURE MANAGEMENT

Once the cat is no longer obstructed, management is the same as for
any other cat with feline lower urinary tract that is not obstructed. For
more details, click here.

THE PERINEAL URETHROSTOMY

Urinary blockage is almost exclusively a problem reserved for males.
This is because the female urethra is shorter and broader, in short, far
more difficult to obstruct. When urinary blockage becomes recurrent in a
male cat, it becomes time to consider surgical reconstruction of the
genitalia to create a more female-like opening. This surgery is called the
Perineal Urethrostomy or "PU" for short. Basically, the penis is removed and
a new urinary opening is made.

Before considering this surgery, here are some considerations:

a.. This surgery is done to prevent obstruction of the urinary
tract. It does not prevent Feline Lower Urinary Tract Disease. This means
the cat is likely to continue to experience recurring bloody urine,
straining etc. He just will not be able to block and complicate the
situation.

b.. Cats with perineal urethrostomies are predisposed to bladder
infections and infection related bladder stones. The University of
Minnesota currently recommends that male cats with perineal urethrostomies
have regular periodic urine cultures even if they are asymptomatic. This
basically means that your cat should have a vet visit and testing 3 or 4
times a year for urine cultures.
WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW IF YOU ARE
CONSIDERING THIS PROCEDURE FOR YOUR CAT:

a.. The metabolic complications from the urinary blockage should be
resolved before the surgery is performed. In some emergency situations this
is not possible (the male cat cannot always be unblocked with a urinary
catheter and a new urinary opening may have to be constructed on an
emergency basis.) Residual urinary toxin build up is an important risk
factor that should be eliminated or minimized if possible.

b.. Shredded paper or pelleted newspaper litter should be used
during the 10 days following surgery. Clay and sand litter may stick to the
incision and disrupt healing.

c.. The most serious complication that can occur post-operatively is
scar ("stricture") formation. This causes a narrowing of the urinary opening
and the surgery may have to be revised.

d.. In theory, local nerve damage can occur during the surgery
leading to urinary and/or fecal incontinence. Obviously these are disasters
for a household pet but fortunately this is a very rare complication.

e.. As mentioned, regular urine cultures are recommended for cats
with perineal urethrostomies.



"MoMo via CatKB.com" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
>I was also very concerned about his not eating because he is also on
>Clavamox
> for this week and I cannot imagine how his stomach feels taking
> antibiodics
> on an empty stomach. I am going to call my vet first thing tomorrow
> morning
> and hopefully he will say that it is okay to keep mixing the foods until I
> can wean him off the old stuff for good. Also Gail, I have not really
> talked
> to other cat owners that have suffered through blockages. Is there a time
> frame in which he may be more likely to re-block? I am walking around
> here
> in a panic thinking that he is going to block again at any minute. Is
> there a
> chance he may never re-block? Any advice you can add to this would be
> extremely appreciated. Thank you again.
>
> Gail wrote:
>>I disagree. I think some cats will not eat and will develop fatty liver
>>disease before they do so.
>>Gail
>>
>>>> Hello. My cat was put on the presciption c/d diet after having a
>>>> blockage
>>[quoted text clipped - 18 lines]
>>> You can get some baby food flavored that a cat would like maybe some
>>> yogurt
>
> --
> Message posted via CatKB.com
> http://www.catkb.com/Uwe/Forums.aspx/cat-health/200610/1
>

MoMo via CatKB.com
October 11th 06, 02:54 AM
Thank you very much!

Gail wrote:
>It is especially crucial to realize that the cat is at risk for
>re-blocking for a good week or two from the time of discharge. This is
>because the irritation syndrome that led to blocking in the first place is
>still continuing and as long as the episode continues, blocking is a
>possibility.
>
> At home, the same straining and bloody urine will still be produced.
>It is important for the owner to be aware of urine volume being produced and
>of bladder size, if possible. Any loss of appetite or vomiting should be
>reported to the veterinarian at once. If there is any concern about
>reblocking, the veterinarian can determine fairly easily if the cat has
>re-blocked.
>
> Most cats recovery uneventfully and most do not need continuing
>medication after they have recovered. Some cats, especially if they have
>blocked before, will require on-going treatment.
>
> Occasionally the bladder over-stretches while it is blocked and is
>permanently damaged. Such cats require special medication to help them
>contract and empty their bladders normally. This is unusual but one should
>be aware of the possibility.
>
> FUTURE MANAGEMENT
>
> Once the cat is no longer obstructed, management is the same as for
>any other cat with feline lower urinary tract that is not obstructed. For
>more details, click here.
>
> THE PERINEAL URETHROSTOMY
>
> Urinary blockage is almost exclusively a problem reserved for males.
>This is because the female urethra is shorter and broader, in short, far
>more difficult to obstruct. When urinary blockage becomes recurrent in a
>male cat, it becomes time to consider surgical reconstruction of the
>genitalia to create a more female-like opening. This surgery is called the
>Perineal Urethrostomy or "PU" for short. Basically, the penis is removed and
>a new urinary opening is made.
>
> Before considering this surgery, here are some considerations:
>
> a.. This surgery is done to prevent obstruction of the urinary
>tract. It does not prevent Feline Lower Urinary Tract Disease. This means
>the cat is likely to continue to experience recurring bloody urine,
>straining etc. He just will not be able to block and complicate the
>situation.
>
> b.. Cats with perineal urethrostomies are predisposed to bladder
>infections and infection related bladder stones. The University of
>Minnesota currently recommends that male cats with perineal urethrostomies
>have regular periodic urine cultures even if they are asymptomatic. This
>basically means that your cat should have a vet visit and testing 3 or 4
>times a year for urine cultures.
> WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW IF YOU ARE
> CONSIDERING THIS PROCEDURE FOR YOUR CAT:
>
> a.. The metabolic complications from the urinary blockage should be
>resolved before the surgery is performed. In some emergency situations this
>is not possible (the male cat cannot always be unblocked with a urinary
>catheter and a new urinary opening may have to be constructed on an
>emergency basis.) Residual urinary toxin build up is an important risk
>factor that should be eliminated or minimized if possible.
>
> b.. Shredded paper or pelleted newspaper litter should be used
>during the 10 days following surgery. Clay and sand litter may stick to the
>incision and disrupt healing.
>
> c.. The most serious complication that can occur post-operatively is
>scar ("stricture") formation. This causes a narrowing of the urinary opening
>and the surgery may have to be revised.
>
> d.. In theory, local nerve damage can occur during the surgery
>leading to urinary and/or fecal incontinence. Obviously these are disasters
>for a household pet but fortunately this is a very rare complication.
>
> e.. As mentioned, regular urine cultures are recommended for cats
>with perineal urethrostomies.
>
>>I was also very concerned about his not eating because he is also on
>>Clavamox
>[quoted text clipped - 22 lines]
>>>> You can get some baby food flavored that a cat would like maybe some
>>>> yogurt

--
Message posted via CatKB.com
http://www.catkb.com/Uwe/Forums.aspx/cat-health/200610/1

Lynne
October 11th 06, 03:29 AM
MoMo via CatKB.com wrote:
> Thank you very much!

I hope you and your vet are able to get your kitty better very soon. I
know how frustrating and frightening it is to have a sick pet.

Edna Pearl
October 11th 06, 04:54 AM
Glad to read your kitty is doing better. I hope mixing the food helps get
him adjusted to the c/d soon. I have had my three cats on the dry c/d for
years because one of them used to get UTI's a lot. They love it and they
have had no UTI's since they've been limited to c/d. I hope it works as
well for your kitty. I know how awful it is to suffer along with your cat.

ep


"MoMo via CatKB.com" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
> Hello. My cat was put on the presciption c/d diet after having a blockage
> this past weekend. The problem is, he won't eat it. I feel so terrible.
> He
> is just sitting in the kitchen by his food bowl waiting for his old food.
> It
> has been 2 days now and he just will not eat although I know that he is
> starving. What do I do? Can I mix the c/d in with some of his old wet
> food
> and slowly wean him off the old food? Please help. Lot's of tears
> flowing
> over here :(
>
> --
> Message posted via http://www.catkb.com
>

Phil P.
October 11th 06, 07:39 AM
"MoMo via CatKB.com" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
> Hello. My cat was put on the presciption c/d diet after having a blockage
> this past weekend. The problem is, he won't eat it. I feel so terrible.
He
> is just sitting in the kitchen by his food bowl waiting for his old food.
It
> has been 2 days now and he just will not eat although I know that he is
> starving. What do I do? Can I mix the c/d in with some of his old wet
food
> and slowly wean him off the old food? Please help. Lot's of tears
flowing
> over here :(

I *really* hate to suggest this- its strictly a last resort (as far as
medical management goes). If your cat absolutely will not eat s/d or c/d,
speak to your vet about adding an acidifier to his regular food. Don't do
this on your own without consulting your vet because if you add too much
acidifier you'll run the risk of your cat developing metabolic acidosis,
methemoglobinemia, hemolytic anemia and Heinz bodies- not to mention
detrimental effects on renal function. If you acidify his diet- add a
potassium supplement as a precaution. Once the struvite dissolves you can
probably manage him on his regular food- providing its canned food and you
can increase his water consumption.

The thing about prescription diets is-- it doesn't matter how perfectly
formulated the diet is if the cat won't eat it. Remember the quintessential
rule for treating cats: *get the cat to eat- any way you can*.

Best of luck,

Phil

MoMo via CatKB.com
October 11th 06, 03:09 PM
Well, I just spoke with my vet and I am going in to pick up the third and
final type of food, I believe he said it was called U/D. Has anyone heard of
it? He said that if that does not work that there is medication that I could
give to my cat twice a day and possibly return him to his normal food. Also,
he told me just to keep my cat on his old food until I can pick up the U/D
(tomorrow) because cats will absolutely refuse to eat and will get sick from
it. I feel so much better. Eating gives my little guy such joy and I hated
taking that away from him after all that he has been through. Thanks
everyone for everything!

Phil P. wrote:
>> Hello. My cat was put on the presciption c/d diet after having a blockage
>> this past weekend. The problem is, he won't eat it. I feel so terrible. He
>[quoted text clipped - 3 lines]
>> and slowly wean him off the old food? Please help. Lot's of tears flowing
>> over here :(
>
>I *really* hate to suggest this- its strictly a last resort (as far as
>medical management goes). If your cat absolutely will not eat s/d or c/d,
>speak to your vet about adding an acidifier to his regular food. Don't do
>this on your own without consulting your vet because if you add too much
>acidifier you'll run the risk of your cat developing metabolic acidosis,
>methemoglobinemia, hemolytic anemia and Heinz bodies- not to mention
>detrimental effects on renal function. If you acidify his diet- add a
>potassium supplement as a precaution. Once the struvite dissolves you can
>probably manage him on his regular food- providing its canned food and you
>can increase his water consumption.
>
>The thing about prescription diets is-- it doesn't matter how perfectly
>formulated the diet is if the cat won't eat it. Remember the quintessential
>rule for treating cats: *get the cat to eat- any way you can*.
>
>Best of luck,
>
>Phil

--
Message posted via CatKB.com
http://www.catkb.com/Uwe/Forums.aspx/cat-health/200610/1

Gail
October 11th 06, 03:40 PM
Was it UR? That's for cats with urological problems. Glad he was able to
help.
Gail
"MoMo via CatKB.com" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
> Well, I just spoke with my vet and I am going in to pick up the third and
> final type of food, I believe he said it was called U/D. Has anyone heard
> of
> it? He said that if that does not work that there is medication that I
> could
> give to my cat twice a day and possibly return him to his normal food.
> Also,
> he told me just to keep my cat on his old food until I can pick up the U/D
> (tomorrow) because cats will absolutely refuse to eat and will get sick
> from
> it. I feel so much better. Eating gives my little guy such joy and I
> hated
> taking that away from him after all that he has been through. Thanks
> everyone for everything!
>
> Phil P. wrote:
>>> Hello. My cat was put on the presciption c/d diet after having a
>>> blockage
>>> this past weekend. The problem is, he won't eat it. I feel so
>>> terrible. He
>>[quoted text clipped - 3 lines]
>>> and slowly wean him off the old food? Please help. Lot's of tears
>>> flowing
>>> over here :(
>>
>>I *really* hate to suggest this- its strictly a last resort (as far as
>>medical management goes). If your cat absolutely will not eat s/d or c/d,
>>speak to your vet about adding an acidifier to his regular food. Don't do
>>this on your own without consulting your vet because if you add too much
>>acidifier you'll run the risk of your cat developing metabolic acidosis,
>>methemoglobinemia, hemolytic anemia and Heinz bodies- not to mention
>>detrimental effects on renal function. If you acidify his diet- add a
>>potassium supplement as a precaution. Once the struvite dissolves you can
>>probably manage him on his regular food- providing its canned food and you
>>can increase his water consumption.
>>
>>The thing about prescription diets is-- it doesn't matter how perfectly
>>formulated the diet is if the cat won't eat it. Remember the
>>quintessential
>>rule for treating cats: *get the cat to eat- any way you can*.
>>
>>Best of luck,
>>
>>Phil
>
> --
> Message posted via CatKB.com
> http://www.catkb.com/Uwe/Forums.aspx/cat-health/200610/1
>