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October 14th 06, 07:38 AM
This is probably easily answered, but I'm not sure what to do.

I adopted a 12 week old male kitten (Poco) a month ago, and an 8 week
old female (Brenna), from the same Cat Rescue 2 weeks ago. I already
have a 5+ year old rescued male (Squeak).

Poco likes to play rough with his teeny sister Brenna and his big
brother Squeak. Fair enough they all seem to get the upper hand once in
a while.

The problem? Poco walks over to either of the other cats when they're
sleeping and literally latches on to their throats! I have tried to
pull him off or distract him - it is impossible, as he hangs on for
dear life! Squeak has now lost his voice and we don't know whether it's
because of this, or some other reason...

What is this behaviour all about? Does anyone know - if it is "control"
or what???? I think I'll try a spray water bottle tomorrow to see if it
stops him, but I don't want to create more problems if this is
something that will settle on its own.

Thanks for any help anyone can give.

Kricket

cybercat
October 14th 06, 09:00 AM
> wrote :
>
> What is this behaviour all about? Does anyone know - if it is "control"
> or what????

It may be play but it sure is aggressive play. I am surprised your cat
does not kick the snot out of him.

I think I'll try a spray water bottle tomorrow to see if it
> stops him, but I don't want to create more problems if this is
> something that will settle on its own.
>

Forget the water. Do what works. YELL--in a big
voice, from your diaphragm, not a little squeaky one.
Clap your hands at the same time and jump up and scare
the bejesus out of the kitten. Yell NO and pursue the kitten.
Charge him, yelling NO again.

They HATE loud noises.

tension_on_the_wire
October 14th 06, 11:15 PM
wrote:
> dear life! Squeak has now lost his voice and we don't know whether it's
> because of this, or some other reason...

Has Squeak seen a vet about that? I ask because if it is
a result of trauma, then it might be good to have his
airway assessed, on account of the fact that loss of
his voice might indicate vocal cord paralysis. If it is
extreme, or bilateral, it could threaten the airway.

This is very aggressive behaviour for an 8 week-old-kitten.
If he weighs anything at all, he might be a good candidate
for early "pediatric" neutering. It might help to reduce his
aggressive tendencies, and there are some vets that will
do it for kittens who have reached as little as two or three
pounds in weight.

You may have to separate the kitten from the others while
they sleep for a while, until you have sorted it out.

--tension