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View Full Version : solution to improve healthy feeding/appetite?


benny
October 20th 06, 06:14 PM
Our kitty is in good condition. Because of a recent cold virus and
subsequent vet visit, we want to change his eating habits to improve
his health risks in the future.
The vet ruled out any health problems - teeth, diabetes, thyroid
imbalance etc.

The problem is his appetite which ranges to both extremes, bordering on
an eating disorder.
He is a free feeder, dry kibble (wellness or eukanuba) from a "kitty
bistro".
History: we adopted him from the pound 4 years ago. He was so vocal and
persistent about wanting food, we got the free feeder to calm him down
and get peace in the household. He likes to be independent and control
his own food supply. His eating behaviour indicates there is definitely
some social or emotional element i.e. he wants us to watch or
acknowledge him, eats when he is nervous or stimulated, etc. He will
*only* eat this dry kibble from the feeder, has never been interested
in any canned food or tempting treats whatsoever.
We have two dachshunds with whom is is very comfortable and interactive
- playing, chasing etc.

Under normal conditions, he eats frequently in small amounts. He is
hefty but not obese. His weight varies a bit according to the season
and how active he is.
When he is upset, as when we are away for 1-2 nights, he *always*
binges and vomits once, leaving a small pile of barfed up kibble to
greet us.
His recent virus caused him to lose his appetite. We tried to tempt him
with a number of things - chicken, turkey, baby food, cheese, salmon
and fish, canned cat food etc., even warming it in the micro wave per
the vets suggestion. No interest, but he is slowly coming around,
eating a bit of his kibble, and is recovering fine.

But for his future health I would like to change his eating habits now.
I am worried if he becomes ill in the future and loses his appetite, it
will be very hard to make sure he gets nutrition. Ideally - I would
like to be able to feed him a varied diet, not just kibble, have him
eat well with us controlling the portions. But how to make that
transition and will it work??? ANY HELP OR SUGGESTIONS WILL BE
APPRECIATED!

tension_on_the_wire
October 20th 06, 11:18 PM
benny wrote:
> Our kitty is in good condition. Because of a recent cold virus and
> subsequent vet visit, we want to change his eating habits to improve
> his health risks in the future.
> The vet ruled out any health problems - teeth, diabetes, thyroid
> imbalance etc.
>
> The problem is his appetite which ranges to both extremes, bordering on
> an eating disorder.
> He is a free feeder, dry kibble (wellness or eukanuba) from a "kitty
> bistro".
> History: we adopted him from the pound 4 years ago. He was so vocal and
> persistent about wanting food, we got the free feeder to calm him down
> and get peace in the household. He likes to be independent and control
> his own food supply. His eating behaviour indicates there is definitely
> some social or emotional element i.e. he wants us to watch or
> acknowledge him, eats when he is nervous or stimulated, etc. He will
> *only* eat this dry kibble from the feeder, has never been interested
> in any canned food or tempting treats whatsoever.
> We have two dachshunds with whom is is very comfortable and interactive
> - playing, chasing etc.
>
> Under normal conditions, he eats frequently in small amounts. He is
> hefty but not obese. His weight varies a bit according to the season
> and how active he is.
> When he is upset, as when we are away for 1-2 nights, he *always*
> binges and vomits once, leaving a small pile of barfed up kibble to
> greet us.
> His recent virus caused him to lose his appetite. We tried to tempt him
> with a number of things - chicken, turkey, baby food, cheese, salmon
> and fish, canned cat food etc., even warming it in the micro wave per
> the vets suggestion. No interest, but he is slowly coming around,
> eating a bit of his kibble, and is recovering fine.
>
> But for his future health I would like to change his eating habits now.
> I am worried if he becomes ill in the future and loses his appetite, it
> will be very hard to make sure he gets nutrition. Ideally - I would
> like to be able to feed him a varied diet, not just kibble, have him
> eat well with us controlling the portions. But how to make that
> transition and will it work??? ANY HELP OR SUGGESTIONS WILL BE
> APPRECIATED!

Try this:

http://www.catinfo.org/

--tension

Desi's mom
October 21st 06, 04:01 AM
Benny,

It sounds like you're keeping an eye on his eating habits but I would
suggest paying extra attention to make sure he does not stop eating!
Also, be aware of any weight loss...I just lost a cat, Desi, he too
lost his appetite and went on to develop Heptic Lipidosis. I would
suggest googling it for more information. It's a serious condition but
treatable, hopefully your boy keeps eating.

I wish I had a fool proof solution to the appetite problem. I have 3
other cats and they're all different.

Good Luck!


benny wrote:
> Our kitty is in good condition. Because of a recent cold virus and
> subsequent vet visit, we want to change his eating habits to improve
> his health risks in the future.
> The vet ruled out any health problems - teeth, diabetes, thyroid
> imbalance etc.
>
> The problem is his appetite which ranges to both extremes, bordering on
> an eating disorder.
> He is a free feeder, dry kibble (wellness or eukanuba) from a "kitty
> bistro".
> History: we adopted him from the pound 4 years ago. He was so vocal and
> persistent about wanting food, we got the free feeder to calm him down
> and get peace in the household. He likes to be independent and control
> his own food supply. His eating behaviour indicates there is definitely
> some social or emotional element i.e. he wants us to watch or
> acknowledge him, eats when he is nervous or stimulated, etc. He will
> *only* eat this dry kibble from the feeder, has never been interested
> in any canned food or tempting treats whatsoever.
> We have two dachshunds with whom is is very comfortable and interactive
> - playing, chasing etc.
>
> Under normal conditions, he eats frequently in small amounts. He is
> hefty but not obese. His weight varies a bit according to the season
> and how active he is.
> When he is upset, as when we are away for 1-2 nights, he *always*
> binges and vomits once, leaving a small pile of barfed up kibble to
> greet us.
> His recent virus caused him to lose his appetite. We tried to tempt him
> with a number of things - chicken, turkey, baby food, cheese, salmon
> and fish, canned cat food etc., even warming it in the micro wave per
> the vets suggestion. No interest, but he is slowly coming around,
> eating a bit of his kibble, and is recovering fine.
>
> But for his future health I would like to change his eating habits now.
> I am worried if he becomes ill in the future and loses his appetite, it
> will be very hard to make sure he gets nutrition. Ideally - I would
> like to be able to feed him a varied diet, not just kibble, have him
> eat well with us controlling the portions. But how to make that
> transition and will it work??? ANY HELP OR SUGGESTIONS WILL BE
> APPRECIATED!

Rene S.
October 25th 06, 05:22 PM
> Under normal conditions, he eats frequently in small amounts. He is
> hefty but not obese. His weight varies a bit according to the season
> and how active he is.
> When he is upset, as when we are away for 1-2 nights, he *always*
> binges and vomits once, leaving a small pile of barfed up kibble to
> greet us.
> His recent virus caused him to lose his appetite. We tried to tempt him
> with a number of things - chicken, turkey, baby food, cheese, salmon
> and fish, canned cat food etc., even warming it in the micro wave per
> the vets suggestion. No interest, but he is slowly coming around,
> eating a bit of his kibble, and is recovering fine.

I think your kitty might do better with timed feedings, twice per day,
of canned food. Of course, there will be some work involved to make
this switch ("tough love" I call it), but it's great to have a
schedule--no begging, no binges, and less vomiting.

Here's a good web site with information on feline nutrition, including
tips on switching to canned: http://www.catinfo.org/

Rene