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a l l y
October 21st 06, 07:11 PM
I'm not exactly inexperienced with cats (6 previously!) but my latest 2
youngsters are causing us a bit of a headache. Brother and sister, lovely
cats, nearly 6 months old. They were trained to use a litter tray when I got
them, and they use it quite happily, but they can't quite get it into their
heads that they shouldn't use any other spot as well. If they're on the
stairs they see no reason not to pee on the stair - why bother going back to
the tray? (At least they always poo in the tray...)

The carpets are now impregnated with the smell of cat pee, despite several
thorough washings (what can I use to remove it and deter them, d'you know?)
and one of these days my man is going to say, "It's them or me!" I really
don't want it to come to that....

The male's been spayed, and I'm going to get his sister done next week. Once
that's over with we'll let them outside, so this may help matters, as my
previous cats have quite happily done their business in the garden or the
fields nearby. But they're still going to be a problem when they're inside.

So... is there something I can do to encourage them to restrict their peeing
to the correct place? Ideas please!

ally

PS - I've read some replies to other posts above, about not letting cats go
outside. We live in a rural area, and our last cats lived happily and
healthily until they were nearly 20, spending much of their time out of
doors. I wouldn't have cats at all if I had to keep them inside. Might be
different in a city, but where I live, at least, cats *must* go outside!

Gail
October 21st 06, 08:31 PM
She definitely needs to be spayed. They need at least two boxes. They should
have a box of every level of the house. If this doesn't work, they should be
checked for a urinary tract infection. Do not use hooded boxes. Use
clumping, unscented litter. It is best if you keep them indoors as they will
be healthier and live longer lives.
"a l l y" > wrote in message
...
> I'm not exactly inexperienced with cats (6 previously!) but my latest 2
> youngsters are causing us a bit of a headache. Brother and sister, lovely
> cats, nearly 6 months old. They were trained to use a litter tray when I
> got them, and they use it quite happily, but they can't quite get it into
> their heads that they shouldn't use any other spot as well. If they're on
> the stairs they see no reason not to pee on the stair - why bother going
> back to the tray? (At least they always poo in the tray...)
>
> The carpets are now impregnated with the smell of cat pee, despite several
> thorough washings (what can I use to remove it and deter them, d'you
> know?) and one of these days my man is going to say, "It's them or me!" I
> really don't want it to come to that....
>
> The male's been spayed, and I'm going to get his sister done next week.
> Once that's over with we'll let them outside, so this may help matters, as
> my previous cats have quite happily done their business in the garden or
> the fields nearby. But they're still going to be a problem when they're
> inside.
>
> So... is there something I can do to encourage them to restrict their
> peeing to the correct place? Ideas please!
>
> ally
>
> PS - I've read some replies to other posts above, about not letting cats
> go outside. We live in a rural area, and our last cats lived happily and
> healthily until they were nearly 20, spending much of their time out of
> doors. I wouldn't have cats at all if I had to keep them inside. Might be
> different in a city, but where I live, at least, cats *must* go outside!
>

a l l y
October 21st 06, 09:10 PM
"Gail" > wrote in message
link.net...
> She definitely needs to be spayed. They need at least two boxes. They
> should have a box of every level of the house. If this doesn't work, they
> should be checked for a urinary tract infection. Do not use hooded boxes.
> Use clumping, unscented litter. It is best if you keep them indoors as
> they will be healthier and live longer lives.

As I said, she'll get the op next week.

I never thought of using a second tray, but now I come to think of it, my
previous cats all lived in a Victorian flat/apartment in Edinburgh, which
was all on one level. We let them out, and they ran down the stair into the
back green (grassy garden area used for drying clothes), so they'd do their
business either in the single tray in the flat or outside. By the time we
moved here to the countryside they were already in their teens, and well
established in their ways, so it probably never occurred to them to pee
anywhere apart from the tray or the garden. But these new kittens are
starting life in a house with 2 levels, so you may be right - I need a
second tray upstairs.

Why don't you like the ones with hoods? I think they're great. I've used
them since they first appeared on the market. When the cats scrape away, you
don't get litter flying all over the room. And they seem to appreciate the
measure of privacy afforded by the roof and walls. Also they're easier to
carry outside to clean out. I can't think of any disadvantages but I'd be
interested to hear your opinion.

As for keeping them indoors - I suspect you and I will always differ on this
one! My last cats were supremely healthy, and lived to be nearly 20 years
old! How much longer or healthier do you think they'd have been if I'd
imprisoned them all their lives? Cats are not like dogs, which are totally
domesticated animals and can be trained to do humans' bidding. Cats are
still semi-wild, despite all our attempts over the centuries to tame them,
and this is what makes them exciting pets. They are outdoor creatures and
need to go outside. I'll probably get a lot of flack for saying this, but
they are hunters, and it's in their nature to go out, build up territories
and hunt. It's unnatural to keep them indoors and I'd never do it, even if
it meant my cats didn't live as long. They'll never *belong* to me, after
all: they just live with me. It's my responsibility to let them be real
cats, living real cat lives, not toys for my amusement.

Anyway, I know there are several schools of thought on this one, and I don't
want to start a flame war, so I'll try not to mention it again, but please
note you'll never persuade me to keep them indoors!

Thanks for the idea about the 2nd tray, though. I might follow up on that
one.

ally

Gail
October 21st 06, 10:42 PM
Some cats do not like the hooded ones. They trap the odors which some cats
don't like. ALso, sometimes cats do not like that they cannot see who is
outside the box while they are inside.
GAil
"a l l y" > wrote in message
...
>
> "Gail" > wrote in message
> link.net...
>> She definitely needs to be spayed. They need at least two boxes. They
>> should have a box of every level of the house. If this doesn't work, they
>> should be checked for a urinary tract infection. Do not use hooded boxes.
>> Use clumping, unscented litter. It is best if you keep them indoors as
>> they will be healthier and live longer lives.
>
> As I said, she'll get the op next week.
>
> I never thought of using a second tray, but now I come to think of it, my
> previous cats all lived in a Victorian flat/apartment in Edinburgh, which
> was all on one level. We let them out, and they ran down the stair into
> the back green (grassy garden area used for drying clothes), so they'd do
> their business either in the single tray in the flat or outside. By the
> time we moved here to the countryside they were already in their teens,
> and well established in their ways, so it probably never occurred to them
> to pee anywhere apart from the tray or the garden. But these new kittens
> are starting life in a house with 2 levels, so you may be right - I need a
> second tray upstairs.
>
> Why don't you like the ones with hoods? I think they're great. I've used
> them since they first appeared on the market. When the cats scrape away,
> you don't get litter flying all over the room. And they seem to appreciate
> the measure of privacy afforded by the roof and walls. Also they're easier
> to carry outside to clean out. I can't think of any disadvantages but I'd
> be interested to hear your opinion.
>
> As for keeping them indoors - I suspect you and I will always differ on
> this one! My last cats were supremely healthy, and lived to be nearly 20
> years old! How much longer or healthier do you think they'd have been if
> I'd imprisoned them all their lives? Cats are not like dogs, which are
> totally domesticated animals and can be trained to do humans' bidding.
> Cats are still semi-wild, despite all our attempts over the centuries to
> tame them, and this is what makes them exciting pets. They are outdoor
> creatures and need to go outside. I'll probably get a lot of flack for
> saying this, but they are hunters, and it's in their nature to go out,
> build up territories and hunt. It's unnatural to keep them indoors and I'd
> never do it, even if it meant my cats didn't live as long. They'll never
> *belong* to me, after all: they just live with me. It's my responsibility
> to let them be real cats, living real cat lives, not toys for my
> amusement.
>
> Anyway, I know there are several schools of thought on this one, and I
> don't want to start a flame war, so I'll try not to mention it again, but
> please note you'll never persuade me to keep them indoors!
>
> Thanks for the idea about the 2nd tray, though. I might follow up on that
> one.
>
> ally
>

Rene S.
October 25th 06, 05:09 PM
> Why don't you like the ones with hoods? I think they're great. I've used
> them since they first appeared on the market. When the cats scrape away, you
> don't get litter flying all over the room. And they seem to appreciate the
> measure of privacy afforded by the roof and walls. Also they're easier to
> carry outside to clean out. I can't think of any disadvantages but I'd be
> interested to hear your opinion.

I personally don't like the covered boxes. They can easily get smelly,
even with frequent scooping. Some cats don't like being "trapped" in
the box while they go, or larger cats can't easily get in and out.

Another thought that I did see brought up is the type of litter you
use. Perhaps try a different type. I prefer an _unscented_ variety.
There are brands that are way too perfumey. If you can smell it,
imagine what it's like to the cat!