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kitkat via CatKB.com
October 26th 06, 11:38 PM
Yesterday I was petting my cat - he got a little annoyed and gave me a
stronger nip than usual - he took a decent bite out of my hand which was
bleeding for a while. I washed it off and put on a couple bandages. I
barely felt it so I thought little of it. Today the area of the bite is more
tender and starting to swell and pretty red.

I have since put on hydrogen peroxide and bacitracin (sp?) and am now
checking the wound a lot.

I might be overreacting, but I heard something about cat bites causing
serious problems - even amputation - because of the bacteria in cat's mouths.

I'm not trying to be a hypochrondriac but I'm a little nervous and want to
know how to tell of I need to go to a doctor.

--
Message posted via CatKB.com
http://www.catkb.com/Uwe/Forums.aspx/cat-health/200610/1

Gail
October 26th 06, 11:40 PM
I would just observe the bite. If it gets infected (pus) or you have a red
line running up your arm, see a doctor.
Gail
"kitkat via CatKB.com" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> Yesterday I was petting my cat - he got a little annoyed and gave me a
> stronger nip than usual - he took a decent bite out of my hand which was
> bleeding for a while. I washed it off and put on a couple bandages. I
> barely felt it so I thought little of it. Today the area of the bite is
> more
> tender and starting to swell and pretty red.
>
> I have since put on hydrogen peroxide and bacitracin (sp?) and am now
> checking the wound a lot.
>
> I might be overreacting, but I heard something about cat bites causing
> serious problems - even amputation - because of the bacteria in cat's
> mouths.
>
> I'm not trying to be a hypochrondriac but I'm a little nervous and want to
> know how to tell of I need to go to a doctor.
>
> --
> Message posted via CatKB.com
> http://www.catkb.com/Uwe/Forums.aspx/cat-health/200610/1
>

Edna Pearl
October 26th 06, 11:48 PM
Gail's advice is good. Keep the wound clean. If it gets infected, get to
your doctor as soon as its convenient. If you start to see a dark line run
toward your heart from the wound, RUN to the ER.

We are assuming, of course, that your cat is properly immunized. If not,
it's a whole 'nother ball game, and you should take both your cat and
yourself to your respective doctors.

ep

"kitkat via CatKB.com" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> Yesterday I was petting my cat - he got a little annoyed and gave me a
> stronger nip than usual - he took a decent bite out of my hand which was
> bleeding for a while. I washed it off and put on a couple bandages. I
> barely felt it so I thought little of it. Today the area of the bite is
> more
> tender and starting to swell and pretty red.
>
> I have since put on hydrogen peroxide and bacitracin (sp?) and am now
> checking the wound a lot.
>
> I might be overreacting, but I heard something about cat bites causing
> serious problems - even amputation - because of the bacteria in cat's
> mouths.
>
> I'm not trying to be a hypochrondriac but I'm a little nervous and want to
> know how to tell of I need to go to a doctor.
>
> --
> Message posted via CatKB.com
> http://www.catkb.com/Uwe/Forums.aspx/cat-health/200610/1
>

kitkat via CatKB.com
October 26th 06, 11:59 PM
my cat has all of his shots totally up to date. I adopted him from my vet
and they assured me that he has a clean bill of health.

I'm not trying to be paranoid - you just hear the worst and start freaking.
The bite is on my knuckle and a little warm, red, and swollen - but nothing
crazy. I don't have pus and no lines to my heart - thank goodness.

I'm glad you've eased my mind. If it looks worse tomorrow I'll see my doctor
and get an antibiotic.

--
Message posted via CatKB.com
http://www.catkb.com/Uwe/Forums.aspx/cat-health/200610/1

MaryL
October 27th 06, 12:21 AM
"kitkat via CatKB.com" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> Yesterday I was petting my cat - he got a little annoyed and gave me a
> stronger nip than usual - he took a decent bite out of my hand which was
> bleeding for a while. I washed it off and put on a couple bandages. I
> barely felt it so I thought little of it. Today the area of the bite is
> more
> tender and starting to swell and pretty red.
>
> I have since put on hydrogen peroxide and bacitracin (sp?) and am now
> checking the wound a lot.
>
> I might be overreacting, but I heard something about cat bites causing
> serious problems - even amputation - because of the bacteria in cat's
> mouths.
>
> I'm not trying to be a hypochrondriac but I'm a little nervous and want to
> know how to tell of I need to go to a doctor.
>
> --
> Message posted via CatKB.com
> http://www.catkb.com/Uwe/Forums.aspx/cat-health/200610/1


Yes, keep an eye on it. Cat bites can be very nasty, but yours doesn't
sound drastic. It was alright to use hydrogen peroxide *once* to cleanse
the wound, but don't use it again. Repeat applications can actually slow
down or prevent the healing process. Also, is your tentanus immunization
up-to-date? If not, call your doctor and see if you should get one. And
don't delay.

MaryL

Eva Quesnell
October 27th 06, 12:25 AM
On Thu, 26 Oct 2006, kitkat via CatKB.com wrote:

> Yesterday I was petting my cat - he got a little annoyed and gave me a
> stronger nip than usual - he took a decent bite out of my hand which was
> bleeding for a while. I washed it off and put on a couple bandages. I
> barely felt it so I thought little of it. Today the area of the bite is more
> tender and starting to swell and pretty red.
>
> I have since put on hydrogen peroxide and bacitracin (sp?) and am now
> checking the wound a lot.
>
> I might be overreacting, but I heard something about cat bites causing
> serious problems - even amputation - because of the bacteria in cat's mouths.
>
> I'm not trying to be a hypochrondriac but I'm a little nervous and want to
> know how to tell of I need to go to a doctor.

One word for cat bites: neosporin! If a red line appears to be coming
out of the are of the cat bite, then get thee to a doctor. The only time
I've heard of really serious problems with cat bites is when the person
bitten had diabetes, but I could be wrong -- always a possibility.

Eva

Edna Pearl
October 27th 06, 12:44 AM
Yeah, I've been there. One of my cats bit the bejeezus out of me while I
was pilling her one day, and I came to one of the cat ngs for advice. I got
an odd group of replies that day, skewed toward the direction of "BE AFRAID.
BE VERY AFRAID." I sat around staring at my finger like it was going to
explode. But I was fine.

ep

"kitkat via CatKB.com" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> my cat has all of his shots totally up to date. I adopted him from my vet
> and they assured me that he has a clean bill of health.
>
> I'm not trying to be paranoid - you just hear the worst and start
> freaking.
> The bite is on my knuckle and a little warm, red, and swollen - but
> nothing
> crazy. I don't have pus and no lines to my heart - thank goodness.
>
> I'm glad you've eased my mind. If it looks worse tomorrow I'll see my
> doctor
> and get an antibiotic.
>
> --
> Message posted via CatKB.com
> http://www.catkb.com/Uwe/Forums.aspx/cat-health/200610/1
>

Spot
October 27th 06, 01:23 AM
I've had my share of bites and deep gouges from cats over the years. If you
keep it clean and put antibiotic ointment on it then 99% of the time it
heals ok. Unless it starts getting extremely red and pussy you don't have
anything to worry about.

Celeste

"kitkat via CatKB.com" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> Yesterday I was petting my cat - he got a little annoyed and gave me a
> stronger nip than usual - he took a decent bite out of my hand which was
> bleeding for a while. I washed it off and put on a couple bandages. I
> barely felt it so I thought little of it. Today the area of the bite is
> more
> tender and starting to swell and pretty red.
>
> I have since put on hydrogen peroxide and bacitracin (sp?) and am now
> checking the wound a lot.
>
> I might be overreacting, but I heard something about cat bites causing
> serious problems - even amputation - because of the bacteria in cat's
> mouths.
>
> I'm not trying to be a hypochrondriac but I'm a little nervous and want to
> know how to tell of I need to go to a doctor.
>
> --
> Message posted via CatKB.com
> http://www.catkb.com/Uwe/Forums.aspx/cat-health/200610/1
>

October 27th 06, 02:01 AM
I beg to differ, I had a deep bite on my hand some years ago. The area
around the bite turned red for almost an inch. I went to the doc and
he said to watch it and if it got any worse, he would put me in the
hospital. Peroxide etc isn't going to get into your blood and attack
the infection, that's silly.

GWB
October 27th 06, 02:22 AM
On Thu, 26 Oct 2006 22:38:31 GMT, "kitkat via CatKB.com" <[email protected]>
wrote:

>I might be overreacting, but I heard something about cat bites causing
>serious problems - even amputation - because of the bacteria in cat's mouths.

Yeah, I heard about that.
No wait, that was Komodo Dragons.
Never mind.

Rhonda
October 27th 06, 06:44 AM
Cats have pasteurella bacteria in their mouths that can make a nasty
infection sometimes. Don't worry about amputation, I know you'll catch
any problems long before then!

If it's more swelled and red tomorrow, I'd go into the doc. My sig.other
was bit by one of our cats long ago and it was a deep puncture -- hard
to clean out. After a couple of days his hand swelled up like a glove.
All it took to fix was a trip to the doc for some antibiotics and to
have it cleaned out again.

I got bit by a stray we were trying to wrestle into a carrier. Mine was
worse the next day like yours, but I kept running hot water over it and
putting OTC antibiotic cream on it, and it was better the following day.
That was as long as I was going to give it before going in.

You're smart to keep an eye on it, and I hope it's better tomorrow.

Rhonda

kitkat via CatKB.com wrote:
> I might be overreacting, but I heard something about cat bites causing
> serious problems - even amputation - because of the bacteria in cat's mouths.

jmc
October 27th 06, 08:49 AM
Suddenly, without warning, Eva Quesnell exclaimed (27-Oct-06 8:55 AM):
know how to tell of I need to go to a doctor.
>
> One word for cat bites: neosporin! If a red line appears to be coming
> out of the are of the cat bite, then get thee to a doctor. The only
> time I've heard of really serious problems with cat bites is when the
> person bitten had diabetes, but I could be wrong -- always a possibility.
>
> Eva

Another word: Tea Tree Oil. Oh, wait, that's three. Anyway, I find
tea tree oil works better for me than neosporin. For one, it seems to
transport deeper into a wound, since it's an oil rather than a cream.

I've used it in the past for the damage Meep occasionally inflicts on
me, I get a lot less redness and swelling than I do if I leave them
alone, or use a triple-a like neosporin..

YMMV

jmc

Randy
October 27th 06, 01:30 PM
"MaryL" -OUT-THE-LITTER> wrote:
>"kitkat via CatKB.com" <[email protected]> wrote in message
>news:[email protected]
>> Yesterday I was petting my cat - he got a little annoyed and gave me a
>> stronger nip than usual - he took a decent bite out of my hand which was
>> bleeding for a while. I washed it off and put on a couple bandages. I
>> barely felt it so I thought little of it. Today the area of the bite is
>> more
>> tender and starting to swell and pretty red.
>>
>> I have since put on hydrogen peroxide and bacitracin (sp?) and am now
>> checking the wound a lot.
>>
>> I might be overreacting, but I heard something about cat bites causing
>> serious problems - even amputation - because of the bacteria in cat's
>> mouths.
>>
>> I'm not trying to be a hypochrondriac but I'm a little nervous and want to
>> know how to tell of I need to go to a doctor.
>>
>> --
>> Message posted via CatKB.com
>> http://www.catkb.com/Uwe/Forums.aspx/cat-health/200610/1
>
>
>Yes, keep an eye on it. Cat bites can be very nasty, but yours doesn't
>sound drastic. It was alright to use hydrogen peroxide *once* to cleanse
>the wound, but don't use it again. Repeat applications can actually slow
>down or prevent the healing process. Also, is your tentanus immunization
>up-to-date? If not, call your doctor and see if you should get one. And
>don't delay.
>
>MaryL

I thought tentanus was an organism that lived in the soil. Is there a really
threat of it from a cat bite?

Randy

http://picasaweb.google.com/crmartin1

http://kittenwar.com/kittens/74045/

MaryL
October 27th 06, 01:34 PM
"jmc" > wrote in message
...
> Suddenly, without warning, Eva Quesnell exclaimed (27-Oct-06 8:55 AM):
> know how to tell of I need to go to a doctor.
>>
>> One word for cat bites: neosporin! If a red line appears to be coming
>> out of the are of the cat bite, then get thee to a doctor. The only time
>> I've heard of really serious problems with cat bites is when the person
>> bitten had diabetes, but I could be wrong -- always a possibility.
>>
>> Eva
>
> Another word: Tea Tree Oil. Oh, wait, that's three. Anyway, I find tea
> tree oil works better for me than neosporin. For one, it seems to
> transport deeper into a wound, since it's an oil rather than a cream.
>
> I've used it in the past for the damage Meep occasionally inflicts on me,
> I get a lot less redness and swelling than I do if I leave them alone, or
> use a triple-a like neosporin..
>
> YMMV
>
> jmc

NO! NO! NO! Tea tree oil is often an effective treatment, especially in
larger animals, but there have been a number of studies that have shown that
it can be toxic cats. Don't take a chance.
http://www.tea-tree-oil-use.com/pets.htm
http://www.messybeast.com/teatree.htm

MaryL

jmc
October 27th 06, 01:40 PM
Suddenly, without warning, MaryL exclaimed (27-Oct-06 10:04 PM):
> "jmc" > wrote in message
> ...
>> Suddenly, without warning, Eva Quesnell exclaimed (27-Oct-06 8:55 AM):
>> know how to tell of I need to go to a doctor.
>>> One word for cat bites: neosporin! If a red line appears to be coming
>>> out of the are of the cat bite, then get thee to a doctor. The only time
>>> I've heard of really serious problems with cat bites is when the person
>>> bitten had diabetes, but I could be wrong -- always a possibility.
>>>
>>> Eva
>> Another word: Tea Tree Oil. Oh, wait, that's three. Anyway, I find tea
>> tree oil works better for me than neosporin. For one, it seems to
>> transport deeper into a wound, since it's an oil rather than a cream.
>>
>> I've used it in the past for the damage Meep occasionally inflicts on me,
>> I get a lot less redness and swelling than I do if I leave them alone, or
>> use a triple-a like neosporin..
>>
>> YMMV
>>
>> jmc
>
> NO! NO! NO! Tea tree oil is often an effective treatment, especially in
> larger animals, but there have been a number of studies that have shown that
> it can be toxic cats. Don't take a chance.
> http://www.tea-tree-oil-use.com/pets.htm
> http://www.messybeast.com/teatree.htm
>
> MaryL
>
>

Please read again. I'm not using it on my CAT, I'm using it on MYSELF,
for damage inflicted BY a cat.

jmc

MaryL
October 27th 06, 01:42 PM
"Randy" > wrote in message
...
> "MaryL" -OUT-THE-LITTER> wrote:
>>"kitkat via CatKB.com" <[email protected]> wrote in message
>>news:[email protected]
>>> Yesterday I was petting my cat - he got a little annoyed and gave me a
>>> stronger nip than usual - he took a decent bite out of my hand which was
>>> bleeding for a while. I washed it off and put on a couple bandages. I
>>> barely felt it so I thought little of it. Today the area of the bite is
>>> more
>>> tender and starting to swell and pretty red.
>>>
>>> I have since put on hydrogen peroxide and bacitracin (sp?) and am now
>>> checking the wound a lot.
>>>
>>> I might be overreacting, but I heard something about cat bites causing
>>> serious problems - even amputation - because of the bacteria in cat's
>>> mouths.
>>>
>>> I'm not trying to be a hypochrondriac but I'm a little nervous and want
>>> to
>>> know how to tell of I need to go to a doctor.
>>>
>>> --
>>> Message posted via CatKB.com
>>> http://www.catkb.com/Uwe/Forums.aspx/cat-health/200610/1
>>
>>
>>Yes, keep an eye on it. Cat bites can be very nasty, but yours doesn't
>>sound drastic. It was alright to use hydrogen peroxide *once* to cleanse
>>the wound, but don't use it again. Repeat applications can actually slow
>>down or prevent the healing process. Also, is your tentanus immunization
>>up-to-date? If not, call your doctor and see if you should get one. And
>>don't delay.
>>
>>MaryL
>
> I thought tentanus was an organism that lived in the soil. Is there a
> really
> threat of it from a cat bite?
>
> Randy
>
> http://picasaweb.google.com/crmartin1
>
> http://kittenwar.com/kittens/74045/
>

I don't think the risk is high, especially from an indoor-only cat, but it
is a precaution that doctors recommend. Don't forget -- cats often catch
and eat critters that are covered with soil (and some will even eat dirt).
http://familydoctor.org/203.xml

MaryL

MaryL
October 27th 06, 01:46 PM
"jmc" > wrote in message
...
> Suddenly, without warning, MaryL exclaimed (27-Oct-06 10:04 PM):
>> "jmc" > wrote in message
>> ...
>>> Suddenly, without warning, Eva Quesnell exclaimed (27-Oct-06 8:55 AM):
>>> know how to tell of I need to go to a doctor.
>>>> One word for cat bites: neosporin! If a red line appears to be coming
>>>> out of the are of the cat bite, then get thee to a doctor. The only
>>>> time I've heard of really serious problems with cat bites is when the
>>>> person bitten had diabetes, but I could be wrong -- always a
>>>> possibility.
>>>>
>>>> Eva
>>> Another word: Tea Tree Oil. Oh, wait, that's three. Anyway, I find
>>> tea tree oil works better for me than neosporin. For one, it seems to
>>> transport deeper into a wound, since it's an oil rather than a cream.
>>>
>>> I've used it in the past for the damage Meep occasionally inflicts on
>>> me, I get a lot less redness and swelling than I do if I leave them
>>> alone, or use a triple-a like neosporin..
>>>
>>> YMMV
>>>
>>> jmc
>>
>> NO! NO! NO! Tea tree oil is often an effective treatment, especially in
>> larger animals, but there have been a number of studies that have shown
>> that it can be toxic cats. Don't take a chance.
>> http://www.tea-tree-oil-use.com/pets.htm
>> http://www.messybeast.com/teatree.htm
>>
>> MaryL
>
> Please read again. I'm not using it on my CAT, I'm using it on MYSELF,
> for damage inflicted BY a cat.
>
> jmc

You're right, and I had even responded earlier suggesting that you only use
hydrogen peroxide once (not repeated applications). Then, I was quickly
scanning newsgroups this morning and had just read the thread on "missing
flesh on neck" (which did concern a cat). Well, you see where my mind
went -- 2+2 now equals 6??? :o(

My apologies.

MaryL

jmc
October 27th 06, 01:52 PM
Suddenly, without warning, MaryL exclaimed (27-Oct-06 10:16 PM):
> "jmc" > wrote in message
> ...
>
>> Please read again. I'm not using it on my CAT, I'm using it on MYSELF,
>> for damage inflicted BY a cat.
>>
>> jmc
>
> You're right, and I had even responded earlier suggesting that you only use
> hydrogen peroxide once (not repeated applications). Then, I was quickly
> scanning newsgroups this morning and had just read the thread on "missing
> flesh on neck" (which did concern a cat). Well, you see where my mind
> went -- 2+2 now equals 6??? :o(
>
> My apologies.
>
> MaryL
>
>

No worries. In actual practice I've never put anything on Meep's minor
scrapes, as there's really no point and much danger - she'd be licking
it off before I put the container away.

When she had a major problem, it was and Elizabethan Collar for her,
poor thing. She wouldn't leave the bandage alone.

jmc

arhooley
October 29th 06, 05:14 PM
I have a testy cat that doesn't like being dragged out of the garage
when it's time to come in, and he's given me a few good chomps.

I always find that washing the cuts IMMEDIATELY with SOAP AND HOT
WATER, several times, does the trick. Wash and dry. Wash and dry. The
itching goes down in ten minutes, and I'm home free; just a matter of
time until I'm completely healed.

Your body will tell you if it's something requiring further action --
by swelling up, reddening, and itching or burning you.

Rene S.
October 30th 06, 07:47 PM
jmc wrote:
> Suddenly, without warning, Eva Quesnell exclaimed (27-Oct-06 8:55 AM):
> know how to tell of I need to go to a doctor.
> >
> > One word for cat bites: neosporin! If a red line appears to be coming
> > out of the are of the cat bite, then get thee to a doctor. The only
> > time I've heard of really serious problems with cat bites is when the
> > person bitten had diabetes, but I could be wrong -- always a possibility.
> >
> > Eva
>
> Another word: Tea Tree Oil. Oh, wait, that's three. Anyway, I find
> tea tree oil works better for me than neosporin. For one, it seems to
> transport deeper into a wound, since it's an oil rather than a cream.
>
> I've used it in the past for the damage Meep occasionally inflicts on
> me, I get a lot less redness and swelling than I do if I leave them
> alone, or use a triple-a like neosporin..
>
> YMMV
>
> jmc

Ok, we've cleared up that the tea tree oil is for the human, NOT the
cat. :) I echo this statement; it does work very well for PEOPLE, as
it's a powerful antibiotic. Lavendar also works very well, if you don't
have any tea tree oil. Another benefit is that there is no stinging
when you apply it to the skin.

kitkat via CatKB.com
October 31st 06, 12:38 AM
while my bite looked bad on day two - by the third day my finger looked a lot
better.

I appreciate everyone's advice and concern.

Next time I'll wash it more carefully - that seems to be the one thing
everyon reiterates.

--
Message posted via CatKB.com
http://www.catkb.com/Uwe/Forums.aspx/cat-health/200610/1