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View Full Version : My first experience with a feline with a URI


T
October 27th 06, 08:18 PM
Emily is our female cat, she's an old lady at 14 but still going strong.

A couple days ago we noticed that our eldest cat Randy would nose her
away from the food bowl. Hmm..

Then we noticed that Emily was starting to look a little thin. She was
taking in fluids but no food. Finally got her in to see the vet today
and it's an upper respiratory infection. Got her on antibiotics etc and
she does seem like she's getting back to her old self.

I find it odd though - Randy is almost 18 years old and has never ever
had a URI. But then I thought about it. Emily was 5 weeks old when she
was separated from her mom, which means she wasn't nursing those
additional 7 weeks and so may not have acquired the antibodies necessary
to protect her later in life.

Am I off base on this?

William Hamblen
October 28th 06, 04:46 AM
On 2006-10-27, T > wrote:
>
> I find it odd though - Randy is almost 18 years old and has never ever
> had a URI. But then I thought about it. Emily was 5 weeks old when she
> was separated from her mom, which means she wasn't nursing those
> additional 7 weeks and so may not have acquired the antibodies necessary
> to protect her later in life.

I think after all these years it might not make much difference.

Cats with URIs often lose their appetites. You need to be sure
Emily gets enough water and nourishment. Sometimes you have to
force fluids by giving the cat water through a medicine dropper.
You also can give calorie supplements.

Bud

Rhonda
October 28th 06, 06:48 AM
The milk they get the first day or two after birth is the most important
to build proper antibodies.

Your cat is maybe more susceptible to viruses because she's now a
"senior" kitty. Has she had an immunization to the URI viruses lately?
Our vet recommends the shots when they are kittens, then when they turn
one year old, then every three years after that.

I'm glad she's feeling better. It's a bit scary when they stop eating
due to a URI. They don't eat because they cannot smell their food. I had
a fun time syringe-feeding one of ours once with a URI, got much more on
me than in him.

Rhonda

T wrote:
> Emily is our female cat, she's an old lady at 14 but still going strong.
>
> A couple days ago we noticed that our eldest cat Randy would nose her
> away from the food bowl. Hmm..
>
> Then we noticed that Emily was starting to look a little thin. She was
> taking in fluids but no food. Finally got her in to see the vet today
> and it's an upper respiratory infection. Got her on antibiotics etc and
> she does seem like she's getting back to her old self.
>
> I find it odd though - Randy is almost 18 years old and has never ever
> had a URI. But then I thought about it. Emily was 5 weeks old when she
> was separated from her mom, which means she wasn't nursing those
> additional 7 weeks and so may not have acquired the antibodies necessary
> to protect her later in life.
>
> Am I off base on this?
>

T
October 28th 06, 07:47 PM
In article >,
says...
> On 2006-10-27, T > wrote:
> >
> > I find it odd though - Randy is almost 18 years old and has never ever
> > had a URI. But then I thought about it. Emily was 5 weeks old when she
> > was separated from her mom, which means she wasn't nursing those
> > additional 7 weeks and so may not have acquired the antibodies necessary
> > to protect her later in life.
>
> I think after all these years it might not make much difference.
>
> Cats with URIs often lose their appetites. You need to be sure
> Emily gets enough water and nourishment. Sometimes you have to
> force fluids by giving the cat water through a medicine dropper.
> You also can give calorie supplements.
>
> Bud
>

She's drinking water and she does eat the wet cat food. She's getting
back to herself again which is a positive sign.

Now we're doing the 7AM and 7PM antibiotic administration ritual. That's
a two person endeavour in this house.