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clearbrite99
October 31st 06, 07:39 AM
Hi All,

I have a 2 year old orange tiger stripe fixed and front declawed male. He
has some sorta blood issue where if he doesn't take the prednisone his white
blood cell count gets too high and he gets sick and could die. He was on 5mg
of prednisone but as of recently he has been moved up to 10mg. He is the
saddest case. He has super white skin is tired all the time and scratches
himself until he bleeds. I have to give him food enzymes so he can keep his
food down. I love him like crazy but the vet has no idea what is the real
reason why his body basically "attacks" itself. It breaks my heart to see
him all full of gashes and bleeding all the time. The vet did mention to
bring him to other places to see if they can run more tests on him but we
just don't have the money to do something like that. Its not like he doens't
have any life at all and thats why i would find it too soon to put him to
sleep. Has anybody had an issue like this? Any ideas on what it might be or
is he just a lost cause that i have to watch die slowly? HELP!!

Rhonda
October 31st 06, 12:57 PM
I'm sorry to hear your cat is so sick. He really needs to get a
diagnosis of what is wrong so you know the best way to treat it.

If your vet is not able to diagnose the problem -- I'd get an opinion
from another vet. Take all of the tests you have already. An internist
vet would be best, which is probably what your vet is talking about. In
your cat's case, it could be worth saving the money for a visit. That's
where we took our diabetic cat on our regular vet's recommendation and
it saved his life.

I'd be a bit concerned about having your cat on steroids long-term, that
can trigger diabetes.

Good luck,

Rhonda

clearbrite99 wrote:
> Hi All,
>
> I have a 2 year old orange tiger stripe fixed and front declawed male. He
> has some sorta blood issue where if he doesn't take the prednisone his white
> blood cell count gets too high and he gets sick and could die. He was on 5mg
> of prednisone but as of recently he has been moved up to 10mg. He is the
> saddest case. He has super white skin is tired all the time and scratches
> himself until he bleeds. I have to give him food enzymes so he can keep his
> food down. I love him like crazy but the vet has no idea what is the real
> reason why his body basically "attacks" itself. It breaks my heart to see
> him all full of gashes and bleeding all the time. The vet did mention to
> bring him to other places to see if they can run more tests on him but we
> just don't have the money to do something like that. Its not like he doens't
> have any life at all and thats why i would find it too soon to put him to
> sleep. Has anybody had an issue like this? Any ideas on what it might be or
> is he just a lost cause that i have to watch die slowly? HELP!!
>

clearbrite99 via CatKB.com
October 31st 06, 10:22 PM
Hey Rhonda thanks for the reply. I was wondering how you get an internist??
All the vet office around this area are like major price gougers! We live in
Fargo but go way out of town to Casselton vet for better prices. Yeah and
the vet said that if he is on pred for too long he will move than likely
become dependent on it. Its funny he has good days and bad, today he was
playing and having a great time. Just hate to see him suffer.
thanx!

Rhonda wrote:
>I'm sorry to hear your cat is so sick. He really needs to get a
>diagnosis of what is wrong so you know the best way to treat it.
>
>If your vet is not able to diagnose the problem -- I'd get an opinion
>from another vet. Take all of the tests you have already. An internist
>vet would be best, which is probably what your vet is talking about. In
>your cat's case, it could be worth saving the money for a visit. That's
>where we took our diabetic cat on our regular vet's recommendation and
>it saved his life.
>
>I'd be a bit concerned about having your cat on steroids long-term, that
>can trigger diabetes.
>
>Good luck,
>
>Rhonda
>
>> Hi All,
>>
>[quoted text clipped - 12 lines]
>> sleep. Has anybody had an issue like this? Any ideas on what it might be or
>> is he just a lost cause that i have to watch die slowly? HELP!!

--
Message posted via CatKB.com
http://www.catkb.com/Uwe/Forums.aspx/cat-health/200610/1

2oz
November 1st 06, 03:14 AM
Rhonda wrote:

> I'd be a bit concerned about having your cat on steroids long-term, that
> can trigger diabetes.
>
> Good luck,
>
> Rhonda

hmm?

best I can tell from steroids is...
they make you swell

they tamper with your heart function (they do)

they give you nightmares

they make you sweat
they make you eat like a gov't mule
they make your beep hard as a $50.00 jaw breaker

wild stuff

people better leave steroids alone

my take on steroids..

they are wonderful in the front, bad on the end

sweet in the mouth, bitter in the stomach

too many side effects

diabetes is hard core if you ask me

diabetes? who can say what causes... it's not just one thing
in general, I would say diabetes are brought on by neglect

it's not just one thing

you can never go after a symptom when it comes to diabetes (you can..
but don't think it's the big fix)

i've never read or heard this next statement:.. I think diabetes and
metabolism are very related

whatchew think

Cheryl
November 1st 06, 03:42 AM
On Tue 31 Oct 2006 09:14:57p, 2oz wrote in
rec.pets.cats.health+behav <news:1162347297.542115.223080
@m73g2000cwd.googlegroups.com>:

> too many side effects
>
> diabetes is hard core if you ask me
>
> diabetes? who can say what causes... it's not just one thing
> in general, I would say diabetes are brought on by neglect
>

Rhonda had a bad experience with a cat on steroids. Steroids don't
cause diabetes; steroids can trigger the disease if the animal is
predisposed to it. Meaning, genetics, metabolism, combination of
metabolism/too many carbs, genetics. The truth is that cats
metabolize steroids better than dogs and humans. Both of those
species experience more side-effects from steroids. Short-acting
like prednisone is better; it's out of the body sooner. Long-acting
like Depo Medrol stays in the body longer, and can trigger side-
effects if it's going to happen at all. Bottom line is that
steroids can affect quality of life if not prolong life. But like
most medications you have to weigh the good with the bad. QOL is
important when nothing else works. Would you rather have 15 years
of misery, or 8-10 years of being happy and comfortable?

--
Cheryl

Rhonda
November 1st 06, 04:35 AM
If you haven't heard of it before, go onto the message board at
www.felinediabetes.com and ask how many have cats with steroid-induced
diabetes.

Rhonda

2oz wrote:
> Rhonda wrote:
>
>
>>I'd be a bit concerned about having your cat on steroids long-term, that
>>can trigger diabetes.
>>
>>Good luck,
>>
>>Rhonda
>
>
> hmm?
>
> best I can tell from steroids is...
> they make you swell
>
> they tamper with your heart function (they do)
>
> they give you nightmares
>
> they make you sweat
> they make you eat like a gov't mule
> they make your beep hard as a $50.00 jaw breaker
>
> wild stuff
>
> people better leave steroids alone
>
> my take on steroids..
>
> they are wonderful in the front, bad on the end
>
> sweet in the mouth, bitter in the stomach
>
> too many side effects
>
> diabetes is hard core if you ask me
>
> diabetes? who can say what causes... it's not just one thing
> in general, I would say diabetes are brought on by neglect
>
> it's not just one thing
>
> you can never go after a symptom when it comes to diabetes (you can..
> but don't think it's the big fix)
>
> i've never read or heard this next statement:.. I think diabetes and
> metabolism are very related
>
> whatchew think
>

Rhonda
November 1st 06, 04:37 AM
You usually have to have a referral from your regular vet to get an
appointment with an internist. You might ask your vet about it, maybe
check on the internet to see if you have one nearby. Ours operated out
of an animal emergency hospital.

I'm glad your cat is better today. It's hard to see them not feeling well.

Rhonda

clearbrite99 via CatKB.com wrote:
> Hey Rhonda thanks for the reply. I was wondering how you get an internist??
> All the vet office around this area are like major price gougers! We live in
> Fargo but go way out of town to Casselton vet for better prices. Yeah and
> the vet said that if he is on pred for too long he will move than likely
> become dependent on it. Its funny he has good days and bad, today he was
> playing and having a great time. Just hate to see him suffer.
> thanx!
>
> Rhonda wrote:
>
>>I'm sorry to hear your cat is so sick. He really needs to get a
>>diagnosis of what is wrong so you know the best way to treat it.
>>
>>If your vet is not able to diagnose the problem -- I'd get an opinion
>
>>from another vet. Take all of the tests you have already. An internist
>
>>vet would be best, which is probably what your vet is talking about. In
>>your cat's case, it could be worth saving the money for a visit. That's
>>where we took our diabetic cat on our regular vet's recommendation and
>>it saved his life.
>>
>>I'd be a bit concerned about having your cat on steroids long-term, that
>>can trigger diabetes.
>>
>>Good luck,
>>
>>Rhonda
>>
>>
>>>Hi All,
>>>
>>
>>[quoted text clipped - 12 lines]
>>
>>>sleep. Has anybody had an issue like this? Any ideas on what it might be or
>>>is he just a lost cause that i have to watch die slowly? HELP!!
>>
>

Rhonda
November 1st 06, 04:39 AM
Thanks for clarifying, Cheryl. Bob probably was predisposed, but I have
to wonder how many more years he would have had without that one
flippin' steroid shot. He got diabetes immediately after that shot and
the internist is the one who told me that was probably cause. I would
never have put that together.

Rhonda

Cheryl wrote:
>
> Rhonda had a bad experience with a cat on steroids. Steroids don't
> cause diabetes; steroids can trigger the disease if the animal is
> predisposed to it. Meaning, genetics, metabolism, combination of
> metabolism/too many carbs, genetics. The truth is that cats
> metabolize steroids better than dogs and humans. Both of those
> species experience more side-effects from steroids. Short-acting
> like prednisone is better; it's out of the body sooner. Long-acting
> like Depo Medrol stays in the body longer, and can trigger side-
> effects if it's going to happen at all. Bottom line is that
> steroids can affect quality of life if not prolong life. But like
> most medications you have to weigh the good with the bad. QOL is
> important when nothing else works. Would you rather have 15 years
> of misery, or 8-10 years of being happy and comfortable?
>

dgk
November 1st 06, 06:08 PM
On Wed, 01 Nov 2006 03:39:44 GMT, Rhonda >
wrote:

>Thanks for clarifying, Cheryl. Bob probably was predisposed, but I have
>to wonder how many more years he would have had without that one
>flippin' steroid shot. He got diabetes immediately after that shot and
>the internist is the one who told me that was probably cause. I would
>never have put that together.
>
>Rhonda
>
>Cheryl wrote:

One shot caused diabetes? That really doesn't sound right. I took a
quick look at the site you mentioned in a following post and two cases
mentioned developing diabetes after nine months of steroid use, not a
single shot. Maybe I was looking at the wrong area?

I guess the shot might have brought it to the front, but I just can't
see one shot causing such a shift in body functioning.

Quite a few members of my extended family have had various forms of
intestinal inflamatory disease, which have traditionally been treated
with cortisone (prednisone). One of the key points of steroid
treatment is that the body's natural production of steroids decreases
when external steroids are introduced, so it is important to taper off
the medication rather than stop suddenly in order to prevent a rebound
affect. The important point is that the cat is already producing
steroids, and that an injection is not suddenly adding something that
wasn't there before. It's just more of it.

If you're feeling bad that a prednisone shot caused the diabetes, I
think you're not guilty as charged. I'd bet that the diabetes was
already there.

Rhonda
November 2nd 06, 02:35 AM
Yep, he had just one shot. He was losing some hair on his face due to
suspected allergies, and the (substitute) vet gave him a steroid shot. I
don't know if it was prednisone or what type. I didn't take him in
myself and the internist vet pointed it out to me later.

Anyway, he was originally fine expect for the problem on his face, then
within 3 weeks he started soaking the litter box. I petted him one day
and felt his spine and realized we had a serious problem. The vet did
blood tests and found the diabetes -- and he had lost 3 pounds in 3 weeks.

I think the search you did was on site articles instead of asking people
on the message board. When I was on the board, there were quite a number
of active participants with cats with steroid-induced diabetes. I just
posted a message on it and will let you know how they answer.

I don't feel guilty about the shot, but sad that it happened. He may
have developed diabetes later in life, but this set it in motion faster.
He was only 10 or 11. He had a horrible 1st year with it, including
bouts of pancreatitus, but was in control the 2nd year. Unfortunately,
he died of cancer, but I wonder if that would have developed so soon
without his system being compromised by everything else going on.

Rhonda

dgk wrote:
>
> One shot caused diabetes? That really doesn't sound right. I took a
> quick look at the site you mentioned in a following post and two cases
> mentioned developing diabetes after nine months of steroid use, not a
> single shot. Maybe I was looking at the wrong area?
>
> I guess the shot might have brought it to the front, but I just can't
> see one shot causing such a shift in body functioning.
>
> Quite a few members of my extended family have had various forms of
> intestinal inflamatory disease, which have traditionally been treated
> with cortisone (prednisone). One of the key points of steroid
> treatment is that the body's natural production of steroids decreases
> when external steroids are introduced, so it is important to taper off
> the medication rather than stop suddenly in order to prevent a rebound
> affect. The important point is that the cat is already producing
> steroids, and that an injection is not suddenly adding something that
> wasn't there before. It's just more of it.
>
> If you're feeling bad that a prednisone shot caused the diabetes, I
> think you're not guilty as charged. I'd bet that the diabetes was
> already there.

dgk
November 2nd 06, 02:14 PM
On Thu, 02 Nov 2006 01:35:25 GMT, Rhonda >
wrote:

>Yep, he had just one shot. He was losing some hair on his face due to
>suspected allergies, and the (substitute) vet gave him a steroid shot. I
>don't know if it was prednisone or what type. I didn't take him in
>myself and the internist vet pointed it out to me later.
>
>Anyway, he was originally fine expect for the problem on his face, then
>within 3 weeks he started soaking the litter box. I petted him one day
>and felt his spine and realized we had a serious problem. The vet did
>blood tests and found the diabetes -- and he had lost 3 pounds in 3 weeks.
>
>I think the search you did was on site articles instead of asking people
>on the message board. When I was on the board, there were quite a number
>of active participants with cats with steroid-induced diabetes. I just
>posted a message on it and will let you know how they answer.
>
>I don't feel guilty about the shot, but sad that it happened. He may
>have developed diabetes later in life, but this set it in motion faster.
>He was only 10 or 11. He had a horrible 1st year with it, including
>bouts of pancreatitus, but was in control the 2nd year. Unfortunately,
>he died of cancer, but I wonder if that would have developed so soon
>without his system being compromised by everything else going on.
>
>Rhonda
>

Thanks, I'm curious about that. My family is well aware of the
negative effects of cortisone. There are other treatments available
now for Crohn's disease and the other variants, but at least two of my
long dead relatives were really crazy because of the long term
cortisone usage. Plus lots of physical problems. A wonder drug
certainly, but not without some serious side effects. Not for long
term use unless there is no other option.

Rhonda
November 4th 06, 03:40 AM
Okay, I have the results of steroid-induced diabetes from the feline
diabetes board. These are who answered in the last 2 days:

5 cats diabetic after taking prednisone
3 cats diabetic after 1 shot of depomedrol (that may be what our Bob was
given...)
1 cat diabetic after steroids, but type not mentioned

One of the cats that had a depo shot was only 6 months old, and was
given too large of a dose. I'm wondering if regular doses trigger cats
that are predisposed, but overdoses actually cause it? Bob was 10 or 11
and overweight, probably predisposed.

That kitten was a feral that was supposed to be re-released after
neuter, but ended up staying with the rescuer after the diagnosis. At
least the guy had a good life.

I don't know about the effect in people. Doesn't it cause kidney damage
with long-term use?

Sorry to hear about what your relatives went through.

Rhonda

dgk wrote:
>
> Thanks, I'm curious about that. My family is well aware of the
> negative effects of cortisone. There are other treatments available
> now for Crohn's disease and the other variants, but at least two of my
> long dead relatives were really crazy because of the long term
> cortisone usage. Plus lots of physical problems. A wonder drug
> certainly, but not without some serious side effects. Not for long
> term use unless there is no other option.

2oz
November 4th 06, 09:56 AM
Rhonda wrote:
> Yep, he had just one shot. He was losing some hair on his face due to
> suspected allergies

Like you said, you don't regret having give him the shot, it was the
lesser of two evils
(although, facial hair?, <snicker>) just kidding

MY CATS GOING BALD!

Rhonda! you're killin me smalls!

I don't understand how this happened...

I don't think the word is trigger.. what makes sense to me is the word
threshold.

Lets be honest, as much as most of us trust professionals, when it
comes to cats, I've read about some pretty clumsy vet doings... (read
about them on this group anyway)

Im not a vet, they know plenty and a helluvallot more than me, and hind
sight is 20/20, but we are still in the dark ages when it comes to cats
and medicine.

November 4th 06, 11:26 AM
Rhonda wrote:
> Okay, I have the results of steroid-induced diabetes from the feline
> diabetes board. These are who answered in the last 2 days:
>
> 5 cats diabetic after taking prednisone
> 3 cats diabetic after 1 shot of depomedrol (that may be what our Bob was
> given...)
> 1 cat diabetic after steroids, but type not mentioned
>

Did anybody respond that they did treat with prednisone and did not
have problems?

We had a dog on prednisone for 5 years due to allergies. Never had any
problem with her.

And this summer, Kira was getting worse until the vet put her on
prednisone. Her results had been getting worse on the previous
treatment. A week after starting prednisone, her bloodwork had
improved. Her bloodwork was returning to normal. She was gaing weight,
more active, and looking and acting healthy again. After she was back
to normal, the vet lowered her dosage to wean her off it. 3 weeks after
she was off the prednisone, the whole illness was back. This time, we
weren't fast enough and she died.

I would give anything to go back in time and keep her on the
prednisone. I would much rather deal with the risks than lose my cat.

Roby
November 4th 06, 03:12 PM
Rhonda wrote:

> Okay, I have the results of steroid-induced diabetes from the feline
> diabetes board. These are who answered in the last 2 days:
>
> 5 cats diabetic after taking prednisone
> 3 cats diabetic after 1 shot of depomedrol (that may be what our Bob was
> given...)
> 1 cat diabetic after steroids, but type not mentioned
>
> One of the cats that had a depo shot was only 6 months old, and was
> given too large of a dose. I'm wondering if regular doses trigger cats
> that are predisposed, but overdoses actually cause it? Bob was 10 or 11
> and overweight, probably predisposed.

I do computer system support for a cats-only clinic that seems to
drift through periods of drug-du-jour. When depo-medrol was in
favor, a lot of cats developed diabetes after several doses. They
use depo much less often now; I suspect it is for that reason.

Prednisone is metabolized into prednisolone in the liver, so it
might be preferred over prednisone where hepatic insufficiency is
present. (I am no expert).

The clinic prescribes prednisolone very often. I don't know whether
they have seen any linkage to diabetes. Steroids are all powerful
drugs with negatives that must be weighed. Dose and duration are
important.

Rhonda
November 4th 06, 05:22 PM
Roby wrote:
>
> I do computer system support for a cats-only clinic that seems to
> drift through periods of drug-du-jour. When depo-medrol was in
> favor, a lot of cats developed diabetes after several doses. They
> use depo much less often now; I suspect it is for that reason.
>
> Prednisone is metabolized into prednisolone in the liver, so it
> might be preferred over prednisone where hepatic insufficiency is
> present. (I am no expert).
>
> The clinic prescribes prednisolone very often. I don't know whether
> they have seen any linkage to diabetes. Steroids are all powerful
> drugs with negatives that must be weighed. Dose and duration are
> important.


This summer, I talked to an animal surgeon and talked about Bob. He said
that you do have to be very careful about those steroid allergy shots in
cats for that reason.

I think the potential benefits must be weighed, like you said. With what
we went through with Bob, I don't think we could give a cat steroids
again without it being a life and death situation.

Rhonda

Rhonda
November 4th 06, 05:30 PM
wrote:
>
> Did anybody respond that they did treat with prednisone and did not
> have problems?
>
> We had a dog on prednisone for 5 years due to allergies. Never had
> any problem with her.
>
> And this summer, Kira was getting worse until the vet put her on
> prednisone. Her results had been getting worse on the previous
> treatment. A week after starting prednisone, her bloodwork had
> improved. Her bloodwork was returning to normal. She was gaing
> weight, more active, and looking and acting healthy again. After she
> was back to normal, the vet lowered her dosage to wean her off it. 3
> weeks after she was off the prednisone, the whole illness was back.
> This time, we weren't fast enough and she died.
>
> I would give anything to go back in time and keep her on the
> prednisone. I would much rather deal with the risks than lose my cat.
>
Hi M, on the diabetes group, I just asked if there was any cats with
steroid-induced diabetes. It really wasn't scientific, but someone on
this group thought it didn't sound right that a cat would get diabetes
with one shot. I was checking if there were others out there.

I don't know about dogs and diabetes, I haven't had a dog as an
adult.

I know that the ratio of diabetes is higher in cats than it is in humans.

We had a rabbit who was terminally ill with cancer. We chose, on our
vet's recommendation, to give him prednisone. We knew he was terminal
anyway, and she said the steroid might slow the cancer down. If we had
chosen to go with chemo, prednisone is the 1st phase of chemo. She
called prednisone the "eat, drink, and be merry" drug. It did perk him
up and he ate like a horse. I think it kept him going longer just
because he ate more and felt better.

Did you ever find out what was wrong with Kira?

Rhonda

November 5th 06, 10:46 AM
Rhonda wrote:


> Hi M, on the diabetes group, I just asked if there was any cats with
> steroid-induced diabetes. It really wasn't scientific, but someone on
> this group thought it didn't sound right that a cat would get diabetes
> with one shot. I was checking if there were others out there.

I'm not familiar with the shots, only the pills. I did have a lady
freak out on me when she heard Kira was getting prednisone. She told me
it would give diabetes. I figured I was okay with that since I had
already done research on anemia and the success rate was 50/50 which is
really not good. And I had seen her her down on the first treatment and
improve on the prednisone. I did go back and do more research on a link
with diabetes. I found several sites that said it was a possibility,
but it seemed to be more of an unknown that still needed actual data to
confirm or reject.

>
> Did you ever find out what was wrong with Kira?
>

Not for sure, but it looks like Kidney failure. Looking back, there was
more urine in the litterbox. Unfortunately, we have multiple boxes, and
they all seem to pee in the same corner of each box, so I though the
one box (the only one Kira was using at the time) was getting more
business from the other cats. I didn't think to ask if the other boxes
were declining in business, and I don't scoop all the boxes myself.

She was also hanging around the water bowl more, but I thought she was
just conserving engery as she was between the water bowl and litterbox.
Looking back, it makes sense and fits with kidney failure.

But at the same time, the bloodwork gave normal numbers for creatine
and bun, so there were no warning flags there. And when I looked up
kidney failure and anemia, it only referred to non-regenerative anemia.
Kira had regenerative, and was nowhere near the cutoff mark for the two
types. So, the behavioral symptoms and dehydration point to kidney
failure, but the bloodwork does not.

It just wasn't an obvious diagnosis, and there wasn't enough time to
catch it. I do wish that we had kept her on the prednisone at the lower
dosage or maybe retested her after a couple weeks instead of waiting a
month. But I can only file that away for future situations or advice
for somebody else when they need it.

We did have another scare yesterday, but it turned out okay. We got
back from errands, and my mom discovered that her cat was breathing
very loudly. Sounded bad. It was 4:45, and our vet is 20-30 minutes
away. My mom called, and they normally stop taking walk-ins at 5, but
said they would take her if she could get there at 5:15. She witnessed
an accident on the way and left her name and number and rushed to get
to the vet in time. Turns out she is having a allergies. We are
remodeling the house, and the new room had the ceiling and walls mudded
and sanded. So, there is a lot of dust all over. So, she has some meds
to help her, and my mom started wiping the walls down and mopping the
floors to get rid of the dust. It's a solid coat of white on the floor
in the new section.

So, the prognosis is good, though we will be watching carefully. The
vet couldn't hear any problems with her lungs, so it appears to be just
in her nose. But Kira started with a respiratory infection that looked
like allergies back in June. I know it really scared my mom. The loss
of Kira is so fresh right now, that even something small is potentially
very bad in our eyes.

November 6th 06, 02:26 AM
My Traditional Siamese cat developed diabetes after being treated with
prednisone. He was allergic to something (never figured out what), and
was scratching off the fur on his neck and head.


Alan

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Rhonda
November 6th 06, 02:47 AM
Wow, our problem started with suspected allergies too. That cleared up,
but I much rather would have continued with allergies than the problems
he got next.

Rhonda

wrote:
> My Traditional Siamese cat developed diabetes after being treated with
> prednisone. He was allergic to something (never figured out what), and
> was scratching off the fur on his neck and head.
>
>
> Alan
>

Rhonda
November 6th 06, 02:51 AM
I'm glad your mom's cat is doing better. I'll bet that was a scare.

Can you keep her away from the new room until it's finished? Maybe in a
bedroom with the window cracked open? That dust probably is tough on
little animals.

Hope she continues to do well,

Rhonda

wrote:
> We did have another scare yesterday, but it turned out okay. We got
> back from errands, and my mom discovered that her cat was breathing
> very loudly. Sounded bad. It was 4:45, and our vet is 20-30 minutes
> away. My mom called, and they normally stop taking walk-ins at 5, but
> said they would take her if she could get there at 5:15. She witnessed
> an accident on the way and left her name and number and rushed to get
> to the vet in time. Turns out she is having a allergies. We are
> remodeling the house, and the new room had the ceiling and walls mudded
> and sanded. So, there is a lot of dust all over. So, she has some meds
> to help her, and my mom started wiping the walls down and mopping the
> floors to get rid of the dust. It's a solid coat of white on the floor
> in the new section.
>
> So, the prognosis is good, though we will be watching carefully. The
> vet couldn't hear any problems with her lungs, so it appears to be just
> in her nose. But Kira started with a respiratory infection that looked
> like allergies back in June. I know it really scared my mom. The loss
> of Kira is so fresh right now, that even something small is potentially
> very bad in our eyes.
>

November 6th 06, 08:40 AM
Rhonda wrote:
> I'm glad your mom's cat is doing better. I'll bet that was a scare.
>
> Can you keep her away from the new room until it's finished? Maybe in a
> bedroom with the window cracked open? That dust probably is tough on
> little animals.
>

She is improving, so unless it gets worse again, we will avoid trapping
her away. The new section doesn't have a door. We do have a huge
plastic sheet covering most of it. And they worked more today to get
more of the dust cleared up. Hopefully, within a week, it will be back
to fairly normal.

The only area that is totally away from the dust is the upstairs, and
my mom rarely goes up there, so Christie would be a very lonley kitty
up there.

I suspect that had Kira not died recently, it would have just seemed
like a routine trip to the vet.

dgk
November 6th 06, 10:02 PM
On 4 Nov 2006 02:26:24 -0800, "
> wrote:

>
>Rhonda wrote:
>> Okay, I have the results of steroid-induced diabetes from the feline
>> diabetes board. These are who answered in the last 2 days:
>>
>> 5 cats diabetic after taking prednisone
>> 3 cats diabetic after 1 shot of depomedrol (that may be what our Bob was
>> given...)
>> 1 cat diabetic after steroids, but type not mentioned
>>
>
>Did anybody respond that they did treat with prednisone and did not
>have problems?...

Most cats that are on prednisone that don't get diabetes. My cat Nico
was one of them; we alternated prednisone and leukeran since he had
lymphoma.

That doesn't mean that prednisone never causes diabetes; just that it
only happens in some situations. Maybe only with cats that already
have a strong predisposition to diabetes? Something else to be aware
of if your cat is on prednisone.