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Wendy
November 3rd 06, 09:52 PM
We trapped a few kittens yesterday in a feral colony. I was checking them
over today and noticed that one has an engorged tick on the back of it's
neck. If I apply frontline will that kill an already attached tick safely or
do I need to remove the tick?


W

Matthew
November 3rd 06, 10:00 PM
I IMO would remove the tick no sense taking a chance

"Wendy" > wrote in message
. ..
> We trapped a few kittens yesterday in a feral colony. I was checking them
> over today and noticed that one has an engorged tick on the back of it's
> neck. If I apply frontline will that kill an already attached tick safely
> or do I need to remove the tick?
>
>
> W
>

Lynne
November 3rd 06, 10:00 PM
on Fri, 03 Nov 2006 21:52:19 GMT, "Wendy" > wrote:

> We trapped a few kittens yesterday in a feral colony. I was checking
> them over today and noticed that one has an engorged tick on the back
> of it's neck. If I apply frontline will that kill an already attached
> tick safely or do I need to remove the tick?

Remove it right away! The longer it is attached, the more likely the tick
can transmit disease to the kitten.

--
Lynne

StephanieM
November 4th 06, 02:30 PM
You know I believe you could just slather the tick in vaseline if it
difficult to remove from the kitten. Sometimes those kittens can
squirm. Or you can try lighting a match and touching it only to the
tick. Be careful not to burn the cat, but if you don't remove the tick
carefully body parts of the tick may remain in the kitten. The ideal
situation would be to get the tick to release itself from the kitten.



On Nov 3, 4:00 pm, Lynne > wrote:
> on Fri, 03 Nov 2006 21:52:19 GMT, "Wendy" > wrote:
>
> > We trapped a few kittens yesterday in a feral colony. I was checking
> > them over today and noticed that one has an engorged tick on the back
> > of it's neck. If I apply frontline will that kill an already attached
> > tick safely or do I need to remove the tick?Remove it right away! The longer it is attached, the more likely the tick
> can transmit disease to the kitten.
>
> --
> Lynne

Matthew
November 4th 06, 02:34 PM
"StephanieM" > wrote in message
ups.com...
> You know I believe you could just slather the tick in vaseline if it
> difficult to remove from the kitten. Sometimes those kittens can
> squirm. Or you can try lighting a match and touching it only to the
> tick. Be careful not to burn the cat, but if you don't remove the tick
> carefully body parts of the tick may remain in the kitten. The ideal
> situation would be to get the tick to release itself from the kitten.

DON'T DO THE MATCH it can cause parts of the tick to remain lodged in the
furball. PLUS THE DANGER to the squirming kitten
Vaseline is a safer bet



>
>
> On Nov 3, 4:00 pm, Lynne > wrote:
>> on Fri, 03 Nov 2006 21:52:19 GMT, "Wendy" > wrote:
>>
>> > We trapped a few kittens yesterday in a feral colony. I was checking
>> > them over today and noticed that one has an engorged tick on the back
>> > of it's neck. If I apply frontline will that kill an already attached
>> > tick safely or do I need to remove the tick?Remove it right away! The
>> > longer it is attached, the more likely the tick
>> can transmit disease to the kitten.
>>
>> --
>> Lynne
>

MoMo via CatKB.com
November 4th 06, 02:39 PM
Like it has been said, just smear some vaseline on the kitten and let it stay
there for a bit. The tick tends to pull out itself in its search for air.
If not, just grab tweezers or even your fingers if it is big enough and give
it a gentle pull. Good luck.

Wendy wrote:
>We trapped a few kittens yesterday in a feral colony. I was checking them
>over today and noticed that one has an engorged tick on the back of it's
>neck. If I apply frontline will that kill an already attached tick safely or
>do I need to remove the tick?
>
>W

--
Message posted via http://www.catkb.com

Wendy
November 5th 06, 12:50 AM
From what I've read the vaseline technique is not recommended.

http://cats.about.com/cs/criseswithcats/ht/removetick.htm

Assemble supplies on your kitchen counter: sharp-nosed tweezers, a small jar
of alcohol, disinfectant, hydrocortisone spray.
Have a helper hold the cat steady for you.
Using the tweezers, grab the tick at the head part right where it enters the
cat's body. Do NOT grab the tick by its body.
Pull steadily and firmly outward, without twisting or jerking.
Place the tick in the jar of alcohol to kill it.
Swab the cat's skin around the bite wound with a disinfectant.
Spray the area with the hydrocortisone spray to help alleviate irritation
and itching.
Wash your hands well with soap and water.

Tips:
The old wives tales of using vaseline, alcohol or kerosene to make the tick
'back out' do NOT work. Such actions may even cause the tick to deposit more
toxin into the cat's tissues.
Subsequent irritation or swelling are caused by the tick's toxic saliva, not
by the head remaining in the wound. Continue the Hydrocortisone spray to
help relieve the irritation.
Monitor the cat's general condition for a couple of weeks. If he displays
any untoward symptoms other than a welt and/or redness around the wound,
that don't go away in a few days, call your veterinarian.

http://www.lisashea.com/petinfo/articles/cat_tick.html




"MoMo via CatKB.com" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
> Like it has been said, just smear some vaseline on the kitten and let it
> stay
> there for a bit. The tick tends to pull out itself in its search for air.
> If not, just grab tweezers or even your fingers if it is big enough and
> give
> it a gentle pull. Good luck.
>
> Wendy wrote:
>>We trapped a few kittens yesterday in a feral colony. I was checking them
>>over today and noticed that one has an engorged tick on the back of it's
>>neck. If I apply frontline will that kill an already attached tick safely
>>or
>>do I need to remove the tick?
>>
>>W
>
> --
> Message posted via http://www.catkb.com
>