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cybercat
November 9th 06, 11:32 PM
I just changed vets, because the last time I was at the vet, I just felt
really uncomfortable. They did not do anything they don't usually do, they
did not NOT do anything they usually do ... I just always leave there with
less than a feeling of confidence. (Phil, you recall though, that the senior
vet there had no idea that hyperT could mask liver enzyme levels ... I had
to take a study you sent me to him before he would agree. And he wanted to
do surgery on Boo's thyroid, not the best option.)

The visit today at the new vet was GREAT. It ia a bright and new facility,
though they have been in the area for 20 years, and the staff is mature,
efficient and friendly. (All the people I dealt with at my old vet seemed to
be about 16 years old except the vet. No slurs against the young, but these
were often the Young and the Clueless.)

The vet tech and the vet presented themselves really well, were gentle and
thorough with Boo, and really listened. All we had was an exam and bloodwork
today. For the first time EVER they had the results of the bloodwork before
I even left the office! I have never had that happen. It took 15 minutes,
and Boo and I just hung out, I read mags and she ogled the critters coming
in and out in the lobby. (I tried letting her walk around the small office
where they left us, but she kept getting into the cabinets, hahaa! So we
went out into the larger lobby and I held her while I read.)

We'll see how they do when we have a health emergency, but for now I feel
really good about the change. The initial visit, plus the exam and bloodwork
cost a grand total of $61. And they had told me it would be about $100. I
know I spent $120 last time I was at my regular vet, for an exam and
bloodwork.

Anyway, those of you who have less than a good feeling when you leave your
vet's office: follow your gut and shop around, if you can.

cybercat
November 9th 06, 11:36 PM
"cybercat" > wrote
> We'll see how they do when we have a health emergency, but for now I feel
> really good about the change. The initial visit, plus the exam and
> bloodwork cost a grand total of $61. And they had told me it would be
> about $100. I know I spent $120 last time I was at my regular vet, for an
> exam and bloodwork.
>

I wanted to add that I called my old vet and asked for copies of Boodle and
Gracie's records, which they made for me and did not charge me for, since
I went to pick them up. I brought the records with me to the new vet, so
maybe
I was spared some sort of processing fee.

-L.
November 9th 06, 11:40 PM
cybercat wrote:
> "cybercat" > wrote
> > We'll see how they do when we have a health emergency, but for now I feel
> > really good about the change. The initial visit, plus the exam and
> > bloodwork cost a grand total of $61. And they had told me it would be
> > about $100. I know I spent $120 last time I was at my regular vet, for an
> > exam and bloodwork.
> >
>
> I wanted to add that I called my old vet and asked for copies of Boodle and
> Gracie's records, which they made for me and did not charge me for, since
> I went to pick them up. I brought the records with me to the new vet, so
> maybe
> I was spared some sort of processing fee.

They should never change for records - it's a professional courtesy.
Glad you found a vet you think you can live with! I hate trying new
vets!!
-L.

cybercat
November 10th 06, 12:46 AM
"-L." > wrote
>

> Glad you found a vet you think you can live with! I hate trying new
> vets!!


Thanks, I am really glad it turned out okay, at least so far. You know,
there are so many down sides to living in the city--traffic, air quality,
taxes, and that's just to name a few--to make it worthwhile, it seems
best to take full advantage of the up sides--more choices in health care,
and in services and retail in general.

With resources so scarce for so many, I feel like it's something of a
moral imperative to get the best product I can for the least money.
Certainly health care for loved ones is at the top of the list of priorities
for quality. If we can care for those who depend on us, live comfortably,
and have some left over to share, I'm happy. If it gets better than that,
it is just icing on the cake.

Lesley
November 10th 06, 01:09 AM
cybercat wrote:
> I just changed vets, because the last time I was at the vet, I just felt
> really uncomfortable.

The first vet I had for Issi and Gaz was technically fine- I just got
the feeling they only saw cats as physiological entities they were very
full of test results and not really explainig them to us- they would
just say "That's fine"

When Gaz became very ill suddenly we had to use another vets, they were
as wonderful as can be under the circumstances (You know the one where
you end up taking the empty carrier home....) I switched to them at
once and have never had a problem with them they seem to like cats
which maybe the first practice didn't and our Aussie vet (Kylie beleive
it or not) has always been great she explains things

Lesley

Slave of the Fabulous Furballs

Lynne
November 10th 06, 01:41 AM
on Fri, 10 Nov 2006 00:09:22 GMT, "Lesley" > wrote:

> The first vet I had for Issi and Gaz was technically fine- I just got
> the feeling they only saw cats as physiological entities they were very
> full of test results and not really explainig them to us- they would
> just say "That's fine"

That's exactly the feeling I get from my current vet. I really have to
probe for thorough information, and it's starting to **** me off. I've
been putting off shopping for a new vet, but now is the time, when everyone
is healthy. I hope I find one as good as cybercat's new vet. I don't have
a lot of choices out in the sticks where I live, and prices vary
substantially. Hopefully I can find a GREAT vet with reasonable rates.

--
Lynne


"Every once in a while, the tables are turned and we get to share our lives
with an animal who takes care of their human." - Tara, rpdb

Roby
November 10th 06, 02:43 AM
cybercat wrote:

> I just changed vets, because the last time I was at the vet, I just felt
> really uncomfortable.

I just switched (again) also. The cats-only clinic we were visiting
had become a dumping-ground for strays ... which were taken in and became
permanent residents. Early this year, there were 15! Some in cages,
others - lots of others - free to roam around the hospital. Cute, but
a distraction to the real purpose of the place ... and I was uneasy
about the disease possibility. I was also uneasy about the staffing:
one vet, no tech, several assistants.

The urge to move on got stronger this Spring. One of the Herd had a
nasty-looking something under his chin. Not bleeding, not an emergency.
I called. Took three calls before anybody answered. Explained problem.
"We're kinda busy. If you want to drop him off, we'll look at him if
we get a chance." I declined the offer. Hate to impose.

Called another vet, explained. Was invited to bring him in that morning.
I like the new vet and her hospital a whole lot better.

Roby

cybercat
November 10th 06, 02:47 AM
"Lesley" > wrote in message
oups.com...
>
> I switched to them at
> once and have never had a problem with them they seem to like cats

Exactly how I feel about my new vet. Two of the girls at the desk
showed me their cats' photos on their computers and told stories
about them. :) And of course cooed appropriately over my cat,
haha! They know every cat that comes in is the most special ever!

Phil P.
November 10th 06, 10:45 AM
"cybercat" > wrote in message
...
> I just changed vets, because the last time I was at the vet, I just felt
> really uncomfortable. They did not do anything they don't usually do, they
> did not NOT do anything they usually do ... I just always leave there with
> less than a feeling of confidence. (Phil, you recall though, that the
senior
> vet there had no idea that hyperT could mask liver enzyme levels ... I had
> to take a study you sent me to him before he would agree.

I think it was kidney function.


And he wanted to
> do surgery on Boo's thyroid, not the best option.)

Surgery is the *last* option.


>
> The visit today at the new vet was GREAT. It ia a bright and new facility,
> though they have been in the area for 20 years, and the staff is mature,
> efficient and friendly. (All the people I dealt with at my old vet seemed
to
> be about 16 years old except the vet. No slurs against the young, but
these
> were often the Young and the Clueless.)
>
> The vet tech and the vet presented themselves really well, were gentle and
> thorough with Boo, and really listened. All we had was an exam and
bloodwork
> today. For the first time EVER they had the results of the bloodwork
before
> I even left the office! I have never had that happen. It took 15 minutes,
> and Boo and I just hung out, I read mags and she ogled the critters coming
> in and out in the lobby. (I tried letting her walk around the small office
> where they left us, but she kept getting into the cabinets, hahaa! So we
> went out into the larger lobby and I held her while I read.)
>
> We'll see how they do when we have a health emergency, but for now I feel
> really good about the change. The initial visit, plus the exam and
bloodwork
> cost a grand total of $61. And they had told me it would be about $100. I
> know I spent $120 last time I was at my regular vet, for an exam and
> bloodwork.
>
> Anyway, those of you who have less than a good feeling when you leave your
> vet's office: follow your gut and shop around, if you can.


That's the bottom line: Your first loyalty belongs to your *cat*-- not a
vet. If you don't feel you can trust your cat's life to the vet- because
that's exactly what you have to do- its time to drop him- quick-- if not
sooner.

Phil

PawsForThought
November 10th 06, 06:55 PM
cybercat wrote:
> I just changed vets, because the last time I was at the vet, I just felt
> really uncomfortable. They did not do anything they don't usually do, they
> did not NOT do anything they usually do ... I just always leave there with
> less than a feeling of confidence.

I'm glad you followed your feelings and found a new vet. I used to
take my cats to a cats only clinic. But when I tried to make an
appointment because Mickey was bleeding from his mouth, they acted like
it wasn't an emergency and said they couldn't get me in till later or
the next day, I can't remember. So that was it was that vet. (I
discovered Mickey wasn't really bleeding from his mouth. He had
grabbed one of my beta carotene vitamins and was chewing the capsule,
which turned his mouth all reddish orange - argh)

I really like the vet we have now. He is the first one that's really
helped Meesha's asthma. He never talks down to us, but rather
discusses her case completely with us and counts on us to work on it
with him by tweaking her diet, giving her medication, etc. Also, he is
always attending seminars and such, in furtherance of education and
keeping up on new practices. The only downside to this vet is he's
expensive, but I feel he's worth it.

T
November 11th 06, 02:48 AM
In article >, says...
> I just changed vets, because the last time I was at the vet, I just felt
> really uncomfortable. They did not do anything they don't usually do, they
> did not NOT do anything they usually do ... I just always leave there with
> less than a feeling of confidence. (Phil, you recall though, that the senior
> vet there had no idea that hyperT could mask liver enzyme levels ... I had
> to take a study you sent me to him before he would agree. And he wanted to
> do surgery on Boo's thyroid, not the best option.)
>
> The visit today at the new vet was GREAT. It ia a bright and new facility,
> though they have been in the area for 20 years, and the staff is mature,
> efficient and friendly. (All the people I dealt with at my old vet seemed to
> be about 16 years old except the vet. No slurs against the young, but these
> were often the Young and the Clueless.)
>
> The vet tech and the vet presented themselves really well, were gentle and
> thorough with Boo, and really listened. All we had was an exam and bloodwork
> today. For the first time EVER they had the results of the bloodwork before
> I even left the office! I have never had that happen. It took 15 minutes,
> and Boo and I just hung out, I read mags and she ogled the critters coming
> in and out in the lobby. (I tried letting her walk around the small office
> where they left us, but she kept getting into the cabinets, hahaa! So we
> went out into the larger lobby and I held her while I read.)
>
> We'll see how they do when we have a health emergency, but for now I feel
> really good about the change. The initial visit, plus the exam and bloodwork
> cost a grand total of $61. And they had told me it would be about $100. I
> know I spent $120 last time I was at my regular vet, for an exam and
> bloodwork.
>
> Anyway, those of you who have less than a good feeling when you leave your
> vet's office: follow your gut and shop around, if you can.

Holy crap - the more I hear about other vets, the more I know my former
vet whom I almost killed, was overcharging me.

Blood work was $130, and office visit $46. I never walked out of that
office without spending less than $150 each time. Blood work took days
too.

I'm going back to my original vet. They've upgraded their facilities so
my guess is they've got an in-situ lab.

Roby
November 11th 06, 04:29 PM
T wrote:

(snip)
>> We'll see how they do when we have a health emergency, but for now I feel
>> really good about the change. The initial visit, plus the exam and
>> bloodwork cost a grand total of $61. And they had told me it would be
>> about $100. I know I spent $120 last time I was at my regular vet, for an
>> exam and bloodwork.
>>
>> Anyway, those of you who have less than a good feeling when you leave
>> your vet's office: follow your gut and shop around, if you can.
>
> Holy crap - the more I hear about other vets, the more I know my former
> vet whom I almost killed, was overcharging me.
>
> Blood work was $130, and office visit $46. I never walked out of that
> office without spending less than $150 each time. Blood work took days
> too.
>
> I'm going back to my original vet. They've upgraded their facilities so
> my guess is they've got an in-situ lab.

Vets around here all seem to have in-house blood testing equipment. They
still send most draws to commercial labs that fax results back overnight.
Some of the tests are beyond the capabilities of a vet's analyzer and vets
seem to trust the accuracy of outside labs over their own results. There
is the issue of liability for a muffed test as well. As long as a client
is willing to pay the price of an outside lab, why risk doing it in-house?

One clinic has an average invoice of $152 per patient visit, up 8% from last
year. Most of the invoices are routine stuff like annual exams, but there
are pricy dentals and surgery included in that average. They open 25-30
new accounts (35-40 new patients) per month. That rate has been fairly
constant for ten years, but a matching attrition rate has kept the active
account total constant. There are a lot of pet owners shopping around.

cybercat
November 11th 06, 05:12 PM
"PawsForThought" > wrote in message
oups.com...

>
> I'm glad you followed your feelings and found a new vet. I used to
> take my cats to a cats only clinic. But when I tried to make an
> appointment because Mickey was bleeding from his mouth, they acted like
> it wasn't an emergency and said they couldn't get me in till later or
> the next day, I can't remember. So that was it was that vet.

Really! It could have been something really serious.

(I
> discovered Mickey wasn't really bleeding from his mouth. He had
> grabbed one of my beta carotene vitamins and was chewing the capsule,
> which turned his mouth all reddish orange - argh)

Well, still. You didn't know and they did not know that it was not
something serious. The thing about vets is, part of what we pay
them for is to put our minds at ease. One vet school student I
knew said that the "large animal" majors sneered at his wanting
to be a small animal vet, because "you have to be a psychologist
too." Meaning, you have to deal with the owners, who feel the
animals are part of the family. But that goes with the turf.

>
> I really like the vet we have now. He is the first one that's really
> helped Meesha's asthma. He never talks down to us, but rather
> discusses her case completely with us and counts on us to work on it
> with him by tweaking her diet, giving her medication, etc. Also, he is
> always attending seminars and such, in furtherance of education and
> keeping up on new practices. The only downside to this vet is he's
> expensive, but I feel he's worth it.
>

That is the important thing. As Charlie Wilkes (I think it was) said,
we come to love them so much, but they have such short life spans.
When all is said and done, and we have given them the best we can,
we need to know that their vet care was the best love could give
them too.

cybercat
November 11th 06, 05:25 PM
"T" > wrote
> Holy crap - the more I hear about other vets, the more I know my former
> vet whom I almost killed, was overcharging me.
>
> Blood work was $130, and office visit $46. I never walked out of that
> office without spending less than $150 each time. Blood work took days
> too.
>
> I'm going back to my original vet. They've upgraded their facilities so
> my guess is they've got an in-situ lab.
>

I think it really pays to shop around. Not only was this first visit very
inexpensive, but I got a nice packet in the mail with two brochures
packed with good information about services, policies, hours and
such things as what to do after hours (they say you can always reach
someone AND they have a deal with one of the 24-hour emergency
care places so it is not so expensive when you go there) plus a fridge
magnet with their number. A nice gesture. But the best thing was the
caring staff. You might talk to other pet owners about their experiences.
Also, you can call around and ask for ballparks on prices for routine
things like rabies shots and physicals.