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View Full Version : Dr. Goodpet allergy relief products - anyone?


November 15th 06, 09:17 AM
Some time ago, I read some recommendations here regarding Dr. Goodpet's
natural products. Since many articles on cat allergies mention the first
thing you should think of is flea bites, I was wondering if I should try
one of their natural remedies in lieu of the steroidal prescriptions like
Triamcinolone and Prednislone. Even Gentaved and Tresaderm have multiple
ingredients.

Various vet sites say that one flea bite could cause an outbreak to an
allergic cat. My cat doesn't show any signs of fleas (although I found
one small dead insect on her tail about 5 months ago), and she doesn't
really scratch either. She just licks her hind legs
excessively and leaves patches of hair missing.

This product is called Scratchfree:

http://www.goodpet.com/library/pharmacyFiles/scratch.asp

Scratch Free is a homeopathic remedy formulated for the temporary relief
of pain, itching and scratching associated with hot spots, eczema flea-
bite and allergic dermatitis. It soothes and aids in healing.

Scratch Free is formulated with the following substances: Berberis
vulgaris 6x, Mezereum 6x, Thuya occidentalis 6x, Solidago virgaurea 6x,
Arsenicum album 8x, Pix liquida 8x, Lycopodium clavatum 8x, Anagallis
arvensis 8x, Sulfur 10x, and Petroleum 10x.


This product is called "Flea Relief".

http://www.goodpet.com/library/pharmacyFiles/flea.asp

Flea Relief is a natural homeopathic medicine that helps relieve itching,
scratching and biting caused by fleas, ticks, mites and lice. It also
aids in the healing process. The combined ingredients in this remedy are
designed to activate the body's own self-repair and healing mechanisms
against itching, swelling, eczema, and sore spots. One of the ingredients
-- pulex irritans -- is flea extract. Thus, this formula actually uses
flea to combat flea!



Ingredients: Apis mellifica 3x, Urtica urens 3x, Pulsatilla 3x, Sulphur
6x, Lycopodium clavatum 6x, Ledum palustre 6x, Mezereum 6x, Pulex
irritans 12x. Flea Relief is a liquid and can be given orally or in water
or on a little bit of food.



I've also heard that catnip on a regular has a calming effect on the
animal in that it reduces their desire to lick the granulomas.

Jack Campin - bogus address
November 15th 06, 11:55 AM
In article >,
wrote:

> Some time ago, I read some recommendations here regarding Dr. Goodpet's
> natural products.
> Scratch Free is a homeopathic remedy formulated for the temporary relief
> of pain, itching and scratching associated with hot spots, eczema flea-
> bite and allergic dermatitis. It soothes and aids in healing.
> Scratch Free is formulated with the following substances: Berberis
> vulgaris 6x, Mezereum 6x, Thuya occidentalis 6x, Solidago virgaurea 6x,
> Arsenicum album 8x, Pix liquida 8x, Lycopodium clavatum 8x, Anagallis
> arvensis 8x, Sulfur 10x, and Petroleum 10x.

What exactly is "natural" about a solution containing dilute arsenic?

Homoeopathy is a 19th century crank science, it has no tradition
behind it (as herbal medicine does) - just another bunch of macho
theorizers using their patients to experiment on.

What does the cat usually lie on? Could there be something in your
house it's reacting to, like house dust mites? If you have central
heating, carpets and double glazing, your house will be heaving with
mites - you might be able to reduce them with wet-dry vacuum cleaner
and a steam cleaner, but it's better to make their environment less
welcoming for them.

============== j-c ====== @ ====== purr . demon . co . uk ==============
Jack Campin: 11 Third St, Newtongrange EH22 4PU, Scotland | tel 0131 660 4760
<http://www.purr.demon.co.uk/jack/> for CD-ROMs and free | fax 0870 0554 975
stuff: Scottish music, food intolerance, & Mac logic fonts | mob 07800 739 557

PawsForThought
November 15th 06, 06:19 PM
wrote:
> Some time ago, I read some recommendations here regarding Dr. Goodpet's
> natural products.

I think you need to find out what is causing the allergies. What are
you feeding your cat? Usually these homeopathic remedies that are a
sort of general type made up of several remedies aren't effective. If
you really want to try homeopathy with your cat, you should consult
with a good homeopathic veterinarian. Try the website
www.altvetmed.org which lists them state by state.

You really should consult with a vet, whether allopathic or holistic.
It's next to impossible to treat these conditions on your own, I've
found.

cybercat
November 15th 06, 08:12 PM
> wrote in message
...
> Some time ago, I read some recommendations here regarding Dr. Goodpet's
> natural products.

Have you actually addressed the question of cleaning products, laundry
detergent brands (perfumes are major problems for some cats), dust,
mold, (which means cleaning more frequently and hepa filters) and
litter? And why aren't you using Depo Medrol? Used a few times
a year, it generally does not cause side effects. It is all my cat needs
to stop her itching, but I have learned that I can control the itching,
in addition to her linear granulom and asthma by controlling the
above and feeding good canned foods. As for the latter, not only
the absence of grains but the additional water seems to help. (I
have allergies and asthma, just as she does, and there is a world
of difference in the inflammation and irritation when I stay hydrated.)

Lynne
November 15th 06, 11:31 PM
on Wed, 15 Nov 2006 11:55:35 GMT, Jack Campin - bogus address
> wrote:

> What exactly is "natural" about a solution containing dilute arsenic?

why people assume "natural" means "safe" or "better" is beyond me. Drugs
are drugs, whether they are conjured up in the lab or extracted from a
flower. They all have risky side effects and varied degrees of
effectiveness.

I agree with the other posters who have encouraged the OP to take
environmental measures.

--
Lynne


"Every once in a while, the tables are turned and we get to share our lives
with an animal who takes care of their human." - Tara, rpdb

Cheryl
November 16th 06, 02:02 AM
On Wed 15 Nov 2006 03:12:10p, cybercat wrote in
rec.pets.cats.health+behav >:

> Have you actually addressed the question of cleaning products,
> laundry detergent brands (perfumes are major problems for some
> cats), dust, mold, (which means cleaning more frequently and
> hepa filters) and litter? And why aren't you using Depo Medrol?
> Used a few times a year, it generally does not cause side
> effects. It is all my cat needs to stop her itching, but I have
> learned that I can control the itching, in addition to her
> linear granulom and asthma by controlling the above and feeding
> good canned foods. As for the latter, not only the absence of
> grains but the additional water seems to help. (I have allergies
> and asthma, just as she does, and there is a world of difference
> in the inflammation and irritation when I stay hydrated.)
>

Has Gracie always had the granulomas, or did it just start at some
point? I know she was an adult when you adopted her, but did she
already have the skin problems?

And for Femcat, did your mom's cat develop her skin problems at a
time that you can identify, or was it just always there?

Shamrock came to me as a foster cat from the Washington Animal
Rescue, and his papers said he was 6 months old in Mar 2002 when I
got him. I think he was older, closer to a year, but he has had the
problems from day one. He lived as a stray outdoors until the
senior woman who fed him had to move, so she turned him in to the
rescue late in 2001. His early papers even show vet records for
treating him for the skin problems, but they were treating him with
Vit E oil thinking it was an infection from a cat fight. His entire
spine was errupted in lesions, and the side of his torso, backs of
legs, and the base of his tail (which our last vet discovered had
been broken at some point - she found a scar when he'd chewed off
all of the fur).

He even had beginning stages of gingivitis when I adopted him. An
early age for that.

I'm just trying to get an assessment of people's experience with
EGC and other granulomas.

--
Cheryl

John F. Eldredge
November 16th 06, 02:28 AM
On Wed, 15 Nov 2006 11:55:35 +0000, Jack Campin - bogus address
> wrote:

>In article >,
> wrote:
>
>> Some time ago, I read some recommendations here regarding Dr. Goodpet's
>> natural products.
>> Scratch Free is a homeopathic remedy formulated for the temporary relief
>> of pain, itching and scratching associated with hot spots, eczema flea-
>> bite and allergic dermatitis. It soothes and aids in healing.
>> Scratch Free is formulated with the following substances: Berberis
>> vulgaris 6x, Mezereum 6x, Thuya occidentalis 6x, Solidago virgaurea 6x,
>> Arsenicum album 8x, Pix liquida 8x, Lycopodium clavatum 8x, Anagallis
>> arvensis 8x, Sulfur 10x, and Petroleum 10x.
>
>What exactly is "natural" about a solution containing dilute arsenic?
>
>Homoeopathy is a 19th century crank science, it has no tradition
>behind it (as herbal medicine does) - just another bunch of macho
>theorizers using their patients to experiment on.
>
>What does the cat usually lie on? Could there be something in your
>house it's reacting to, like house dust mites? If you have central
>heating, carpets and double glazing, your house will be heaving with
>mites - you might be able to reduce them with wet-dry vacuum cleaner
>and a steam cleaner, but it's better to make their environment less
>welcoming for them.

Homeopathy holds that, as a medicine becomes more dilute, it becomes
more effective. As a result, what you have is basically overpriced
water, with only a few atoms of the supposed medicine. So, I don't
think the cat is likely to be poisoned by the white arsenic. On the
other hand, it isn't likely to be helped by the homeopathic medicine,
either. What little effect homeopathic medicines have is by the
placebo effect (the patient expects to get better, and so does so).
Since the cat doesn't understand that what is being given to it is
supposed to cure it, I would not expect any placebo effect to happen.

--
John F. Eldredge --
PGP key available from http://pgp.mit.edu
"Reserve your right to think, for even to think wrongly is better
than not to think at all." -- Hypatia of Alexandria

cybercat
November 16th 06, 03:09 PM
"Cheryl" > wrote
>
> Has Gracie always had the granulomas, or did it just start at some
> point? I know she was an adult when you adopted her, but did she
> already have the skin problems?
>


If I recall correctly, I felt bumps on the backs of her legs after I had
had her for about a year, took her in and he told me it was Linear
Granuloma. They may have been there from the day
I brought her home from the shelter. She had an asthma attack
the night I brought her home. I am doing something right because
she has had no lesions, no bumps, so wheezing, and no Depo
shot since June. Thank God. (I wonder if they "age" out of it? She
is about seven now.)



--
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com

November 21st 06, 06:46 AM
Jack Campin - bogus address > wrote in
:

> In article >,
> wrote:
>
>> Some time ago, I read some recommendations here regarding Dr.
>> Goodpet's natural products.
>> Scratch Free is a homeopathic remedy formulated for the temporary
>> relief of pain, itching and scratching associated with hot spots,
>> eczema flea- bite and allergic dermatitis. It soothes and aids in
>> healing. Scratch Free is formulated with the following substances:
>> Berberis vulgaris 6x, Mezereum 6x, Thuya occidentalis 6x, Solidago
>> virgaurea 6x, Arsenicum album 8x, Pix liquida 8x, Lycopodium clavatum
>> 8x, Anagallis arvensis 8x, Sulfur 10x, and Petroleum 10x.
>
> What exactly is "natural" about a solution containing dilute arsenic?
>
> Homoeopathy is a 19th century crank science, it has no tradition
> behind it (as herbal medicine does) - just another bunch of macho
> theorizers using their patients to experiment on.
>
> What does the cat usually lie on? Could there be something in your
> house it's reacting to, like house dust mites? If you have central
> heating, carpets and double glazing, your house will be heaving with
> mites - you might be able to reduce them with wet-dry vacuum cleaner
> and a steam cleaner, but it's better to make their environment less
> welcoming for them.
>
> ============== j-c ====== @ ====== purr . demon . co . uk
> ============== Jack Campin: 11 Third St, Newtongrange EH22 4PU,
> Scotland | tel 0131 660 4760 <http://www.purr.demon.co.uk/jack/> for
> CD-ROMs and free | fax 0870 0554 975 stuff: Scottish music, food
> intolerance, & Mac logic fonts | mob 07800 739 557
>


The apartment does have a central heating vent with a filter that's
cleaned once a year, plus carpeting in one room, so you may have
something there. The cat, when she stays in the carpeted room, lies on
the carpet, and she loves to sleep on the heating vent when it's not on
(this is a heater that blows warm air through circulated water when it is
on, not the kind with oil or coils).

It will be difficult to influence my mom to get rid of that carpet as it
took me quite awhile to get her to remove the one in another room.
She's an elderly woman and quite set in her ways. Since I don't live
with her, it's going to be hard to get her to agree to a steam cleaner
and a wet/dry vacuum.

It's amazing how you could put ten cats in that kind of environment (i.e.
cats who live in warehouses,stores or fully carpeted homes) and no
problems occur. Another cat can be wildly allergic just like humans.

November 21st 06, 06:53 AM
"PawsForThought" > wrote in
oups.com:

>
> wrote:
>> Some time ago, I read some recommendations here regarding Dr. Goodpet's
>> natural products.
>
> I think you need to find out what is causing the allergies. What are
> you feeding your cat? Usually these homeopathic remedies that are a
> sort of general type made up of several remedies aren't effective. If
> you really want to try homeopathy with your cat, you should consult
> with a good homeopathic veterinarian. Try the website
> www.altvetmed.org which lists them state by state.
>
> You really should consult with a vet, whether allopathic or holistic.
> It's next to impossible to treat these conditions on your own, I've
> found.
>
>

I don't know if you've been reading my posts over the last two years, but
I've tried changing foods, Prednisolone, Triamcinalone, Gentaved, Tresaderm
, an anti-depressant, an anti-allergy med, etc. I've been to the vet over
a dozen times either on visits or to pick up meds. I've written feline
specialists who think my vet is on the right track, though they recommend
full blood workups. From what I've read here, everyone who's had the blood
tests for allergies still winds up without the desired result.

I had her take a blood test several years ago for something else, and the
yelping, squirming, and frightened look on her face was enough to make me
avoid them unless absolutely necessary. The vet and his assistant had to
put a cone on the poor thing so she would see the procedure.

It just seems after reading the posts here, and on other sites, that skin
problems are nearly impossible to cure in cats.

November 21st 06, 06:58 AM
"cybercat" > wrote in :

>
> > wrote in message
> ...
>> Some time ago, I read some recommendations here regarding Dr. Goodpet's
>> natural products.
>
> Have you actually addressed the question of cleaning products, laundry
> detergent brands (perfumes are major problems for some cats), dust,
> mold, (which means cleaning more frequently and hepa filters) and
> litter? And why aren't you using Depo Medrol? Used a few times
> a year, it generally does not cause side effects. It is all my cat needs
> to stop her itching, but I have learned that I can control the itching,
> in addition to her linear granulom and asthma by controlling the
> above and feeding good canned foods. As for the latter, not only
> the absence of grains but the additional water seems to help. (I
> have allergies and asthma, just as she does, and there is a world
> of difference in the inflammation and irritation when I stay hydrated.)
>
>
>

Would you suggest changing the kitty litter? We use Tidy Cat. What brand
would you suggest. She had two shots of Depo Medrol last year, but my vet
would like to avoid them if she can be treated with pills (Prednisolone and
now Triamcinalone) since they only remain in the system for a few days.


What canned foods do you recommend? Have you removed dry food completely
from her diet? I tried removing corn and wheat gluten (Fancy Feast flavors
with no
grains and Hills Prescription Diet) and she seems to have gotten worse.

She doesn't seem to like the Wellness brand. Do you use a air purifier
with a hepa filter? If so, which one?

November 21st 06, 07:07 AM
Cheryl > wrote in news:[email protected]
130.133.1.4:

>
> And for Femcat, did your mom's cat develop her skin problems at a
> time that you can identify, or was it just always there?

Like you, we adopted her from a shelter (the local ASPCA), but her records
made no mention of a skin problem. I think it developed about three years
later. I'm trying to remember if was around the time we switched her to
Purin Pro Plan Chicken and Rice mixed with Pro Plan Beef and Rice dry food.

I think it was after that, though. I can't tell you how often I sit and
just try to figure out a solution. I'm sure it's the same with you.

cybercat
November 22nd 06, 12:46 AM
> wrote

> Would you suggest changing the kitty litter? We use Tidy Cat. What brand
> would you suggest.

I'm sorry, I missed this. Anything witn NO SCENT. They make cheap scoopables
with no scent. Dust does not seem to matter to my cat.

>She had two shots of Depo Medrol last year, but my vet
> would like to avoid them if she can be treated with pills (Prednisolone
> and
> now Triamcinalone) since they only remain in the system for a few days.
>

Depo is a wonder drug, and I know it is a gamble and every cat is different,
but my vet seemed to think that four times a year did not significantly
increase
a cat's chances of diabetes. And it keeps the granuloma completely at bay.
That said, my Gracie also has asthma, so I have a better reason to give her
Depo. For just the skin condition? If it was not affected by feeding
grainless
food? Get everything perfumed out of the house. No air fresheners, no
scented
candles, hair spray unless you keep her out of that room. I stopped wearing
perfume. Also, change cleaning products. I had a cleaning service early on,
and for whatever reason, when I began cleaning my own house again, her
EGC improved. I use Pine Sol and some bleach-based products on the
porcelain. Laundry detergent, too. Try something for sensitive skin on your
bedding, like Arm and Hammer. (Tide and Gain are both so harsh and so
heavily perfumed.) Don't use powdered rug spot cleaners, steam clean
instead, they are cheap to rent.

>
> What canned foods do you recommend? Have you removed dry food completely
> from her diet?

I feed Fancy Feast, no grains, which did not work for you.
It could be your cat does not have a food allergy. Perhaps just controlling
irritants
in the air and on fabric and rugs might do the trick.

I tried removing corn and wheat gluten (Fancy Feast flavors
> with no
> grains and Hills Prescription Diet) and she seems to have gotten worse.
>
> She doesn't seem to like the Wellness brand. Do you use a air purifier
> with a hepa filter? If so, which one?
>
I use Duracraft and Holmes. The bedroom is the most important place here,
because this is where she sleeps and hangs out a lot. ANY Hepa is just fine,
but get a big one. The filters are expensive, but I don't change them as
often
as they say to--more like twice a year works for me.

Good luck. I know you hate seeing her suffer.

cybercat
November 22nd 06, 12:58 AM
> wrote
>>
>
> I don't know if you've been reading my posts over the last two years, but
> I've tried changing foods, Prednisolone, Triamcinalone, Gentaved,
> Tresaderm
> , an anti-depressant, an anti-allergy med, etc. I've been to the vet over
> a dozen times either on visits or to pick up meds. I've written feline
> specialists who think my vet is on the right track, though they recommend
> full blood workups. From what I've read here, everyone who's had the
> blood
> tests for allergies still winds up without the desired result.
>
> I had her take a blood test several years ago for something else, and the
> yelping, squirming, and frightened look on her face was enough to make me
> avoid them unless absolutely necessary. The vet and his assistant had to
> put a cone on the poor thing so she would see the procedure.
>
> It just seems after reading the posts here, and on other sites, that skin
> problems are nearly impossible to cure in cats.

Over five years, using Depo Medrol sparingly, and controlling allergens,
along with feeding good canned food, my Gracie has gradually had
fewer and fewer outbreaks of EGC and also asthma attacks. Cured?
Probably not. Controlled? You bet. (She has gotten bumps on her
legs AND lip lesions, different times.

Rethink Depo Medrol, even if just every six months. Think of the
situation as a kind of "package deal." Control the allergens, use
the Depo sparingly, feel good moist pure protein, AND keep the
stress to a minimum. Gracie's skin improves with her happiness
and vice versa. I am in an optimal situation her because I work at
home much of the time and dote on her. She gets a lot of play and
attention and seeks us out for affection. She has her own turf, and
another cat to hang out with if she wants to. She has hiding places
and lots of scratchers and toys.We DO have hardwoods on two
of the three floors, and slate and tile elsewhere. I do think that helps.
My only curtains are sheers I wash regularly upstairs, aside from
the drapes in the formal dining room where she rarely goes. You
see, I am allergic and asthmatic too. I am also allergic to cats.
Eventually I may have to start getting the human equivalent of
Depo shots myself.