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KittiKat
November 18th 06, 06:04 AM
Hi All,

I need some advice - Several weeks ago I noticed that my cat's gums had
become very red and inflammed. I look at her mouth fairly regularly and
was surprised to see this inflammation. She is still eating, but is
leaving some food during the second feeding, and occassionally has been
pawing at her mouth. Still is grooming herself, playing, seems to be
the old her, but is sleeping a little more than usual, and sometimes is
grouchy with the other cat, which concerned me. So today I brought her
to the vet. The vet stated that my cat does have some gingivitis but
not nearly enough to warrant the degree of gum inflammation that my cat
has. Additionally, the vet said the back of my cat's throat is red in
appearance. Now the vet is unsure of what may be causing this, so a
full panel blood workup was ordered to rule out other prolems, like
leukemia, anemia, etc, that may be impairing my cats immune system and
causing the increased reaction in her mouth. My cat already has
eosnophil granuloma and many allergies and her mouth has some
granuloma's due to this condition, but, nothing new, she's had this for
5 years or so. My vet mentioned that the cat may have stomatitis but is
*not sure*. Right now the cat has been prescribed Antirobe 25 mg twice
a day and metacam for a few days for pain. The plan is to take my cat
in next Tuesday to do full dental surgery, which may include
extraction. I am really freaking out over this, as my vet is not sure
what is causing this problem and wants to operate and take my cats
teeth out. When I look at her teeth they look very white, with little
tartar or plaque, and yes, I am not a vet, but her teeth do not look
that bad. If it is Stomatitis would it not be better to do a full
dental exam and biopsy, before proceeding??? Is there not a first line
of treatment that is taken before proceeding to teeth extraction?
Addtionally, would I be wrong in getting a second opinion? I hate to
say this, but I feel that this clinic, a one veterinarian business, may
be looking out for the best interest of the business rather than my
cat's well being. The quote on the surgery is also mind blowing. I love
my cat and would pay any amount, but I do not want to be paying for
needless surgery that may cause my cat more pain and not solve anything
in the end. Any advice would be helpful.

Buddy's Mom
November 18th 06, 11:00 AM
Get a second opinion from another vet first.

KittiKat wrote:
> Hi All,
>
> I need some advice - Several weeks ago I noticed that my cat's gums had
> become very red and inflammed. I look at her mouth fairly regularly and
> was surprised to see this inflammation. She is still eating, but is
> leaving some food during the second feeding, and occassionally has been
> pawing at her mouth. Still is grooming herself, playing, seems to be
> the old her, but is sleeping a little more than usual, and sometimes is
> grouchy with the other cat, which concerned me. So today I brought her
> to the vet. The vet stated that my cat does have some gingivitis but
> not nearly enough to warrant the degree of gum inflammation that my cat
> has. Additionally, the vet said the back of my cat's throat is red in
> appearance. Now the vet is unsure of what may be causing this, so a
> full panel blood workup was ordered to rule out other prolems, like
> leukemia, anemia, etc, that may be impairing my cats immune system and
> causing the increased reaction in her mouth. My cat already has
> eosnophil granuloma and many allergies and her mouth has some
> granuloma's due to this condition, but, nothing new, she's had this for
> 5 years or so. My vet mentioned that the cat may have stomatitis but is
> *not sure*. Right now the cat has been prescribed Antirobe 25 mg twice
> a day and metacam for a few days for pain. The plan is to take my cat
> in next Tuesday to do full dental surgery, which may include
> extraction. I am really freaking out over this, as my vet is not sure
> what is causing this problem and wants to operate and take my cats
> teeth out. When I look at her teeth they look very white, with little
> tartar or plaque, and yes, I am not a vet, but her teeth do not look
> that bad. If it is Stomatitis would it not be better to do a full
> dental exam and biopsy, before proceeding??? Is there not a first line
> of treatment that is taken before proceeding to teeth extraction?
> Addtionally, would I be wrong in getting a second opinion? I hate to
> say this, but I feel that this clinic, a one veterinarian business, may
> be looking out for the best interest of the business rather than my
> cat's well being. The quote on the surgery is also mind blowing. I love
> my cat and would pay any amount, but I do not want to be paying for
> needless surgery that may cause my cat more pain and not solve anything
> in the end. Any advice would be helpful.

MaryL
November 18th 06, 12:07 PM
"KittiKat" > wrote in message
ups.com...
> Hi All,
>
> I need some advice - Several weeks ago I noticed that my cat's gums had
> become very red and inflammed. I look at her mouth fairly regularly and
> was surprised to see this inflammation. She is still eating, but is
> leaving some food during the second feeding, and occassionally has been
> pawing at her mouth. Still is grooming herself, playing, seems to be
> the old her, but is sleeping a little more than usual, and sometimes is
> grouchy with the other cat, which concerned me. So today I brought her
> to the vet. The vet stated that my cat does have some gingivitis but
> not nearly enough to warrant the degree of gum inflammation that my cat
> has. Additionally, the vet said the back of my cat's throat is red in
> appearance. Now the vet is unsure of what may be causing this, so a
> full panel blood workup was ordered to rule out other prolems, like
> leukemia, anemia, etc, that may be impairing my cats immune system and
> causing the increased reaction in her mouth. My cat already has
> eosnophil granuloma and many allergies and her mouth has some
> granuloma's due to this condition, but, nothing new, she's had this for
> 5 years or so. My vet mentioned that the cat may have stomatitis but is
> *not sure*. Right now the cat has been prescribed Antirobe 25 mg twice
> a day and metacam for a few days for pain. The plan is to take my cat
> in next Tuesday to do full dental surgery, which may include
> extraction. I am really freaking out over this, as my vet is not sure
> what is causing this problem and wants to operate and take my cats
> teeth out. When I look at her teeth they look very white, with little
> tartar or plaque, and yes, I am not a vet, but her teeth do not look
> that bad. If it is Stomatitis would it not be better to do a full
> dental exam and biopsy, before proceeding??? Is there not a first line
> of treatment that is taken before proceeding to teeth extraction?
> Addtionally, would I be wrong in getting a second opinion? I hate to
> say this, but I feel that this clinic, a one veterinarian business, may
> be looking out for the best interest of the business rather than my
> cat's well being. The quote on the surgery is also mind blowing. I love
> my cat and would pay any amount, but I do not want to be paying for
> needless surgery that may cause my cat more pain and not solve anything
> in the end. Any advice would be helpful.
>

Yes, you absolutely should get a second opinion. I would suggest a second
opinion in a case like this even if you did not have any doubts about your
vet -- but your statement that you think the vet "may be looking out for the
best interest of the business" should send all sorts of red flags waving!
If possible, contact a feline-only vet or ask about a referral to a college
of veterinary medicine if you have one within driving distance. In terms of
cost -- yes, dental surgery is expensive. It is worth it if the correct
diagnosis is done. You might want to read about the problem in a source
such as Merck Veterinary Manual
<http://www.merckvetmanual.com/mvm/index.jsp> -- search for "feline
stomatitis."

MaryL

Phil P.
November 18th 06, 04:35 PM
"KittiKat" > wrote in message
ups.com...
> Hi All,
>
> I need some advice - Several weeks ago I noticed that my cat's gums had
> become very red and inflammed. I look at her mouth fairly regularly and
> was surprised to see this inflammation. She is still eating, but is
> leaving some food during the second feeding, and occassionally has been
> pawing at her mouth. Still is grooming herself, playing, seems to be
> the old her, but is sleeping a little more than usual, and sometimes is
> grouchy with the other cat, which concerned me. So today I brought her
> to the vet. The vet stated that my cat does have some gingivitis but
> not nearly enough to warrant the degree of gum inflammation that my cat
> has.

Some cats develop reactions to plaque- especially at the gumline. Any amount
can cause a reaction.


Additionally, the vet said the back of my cat's throat is red in
> appearance. Now the vet is unsure of what may be causing this,

Eosinophilic complex can cause inflammation of the buccal mucosa and
glossopalatine arches-- its all part of the feline stomatitis/faucitis
complex. Is he unsure of what's causing the faucitis or the eosinophilic
complex? The latter is probably causing the former.

so a
> full panel blood workup was ordered to rule out other prolems, like
> leukemia, anemia, etc, that may be impairing my cats immune system and
> causing the increased reaction in her mouth. My cat already has
> eosnophil granuloma and many allergies and her mouth has some
> granuloma's due to this condition, but, nothing new, she's had this for
> 5 years or so. My vet mentioned that the cat may have stomatitis but is
> *not sure*.

It definitely sounds like stomatitis/faucitis. Cats can have varying degrees
of inflammation- but its still stomatitis/faucitis.


Right now the cat has been prescribed Antirobe 25 mg twice
> a day and metacam for a few days for pain. The plan is to take my cat
> in next Tuesday to do full dental surgery, which may include
> extraction. I am really freaking out over this, as my vet is not sure
> what is causing this problem and wants to operate and take my cats
> teeth out. When I look at her teeth they look very white, with little
> tartar or plaque, and yes, I am not a vet, but her teeth do not look
> that bad. If it is Stomatitis would it not be better to do a full
> dental exam and biopsy, before proceeding???


Absotively!


Is there not a first line
> of treatment that is taken before proceeding to teeth extraction?


Immunosuppressive doses of steroids are usually tried first- but long term
steroid therapy can lead to complications of their own.


> Addtionally, would I be wrong in getting a second opinion?

Absotively! Search for an AVDC Diplomate in your aera:
http://www.avdc-dms.org/dms/diplomates.cfm


I hate to
> say this, but I feel that this clinic, a one veterinarian business, may
> be looking out for the best interest of the business rather than my
> cat's well being. The quote on the surgery is also mind blowing.


After the new 3-year vaccination guidelines were published in 2000- a lot of
vets raised all their fees to make up for the loss in revenue. Some vets
just got carried away. I know a few who nearly doubled their fees!


I love
> my cat and would pay any amount, but I do not want to be paying for
> needless surgery that may cause my cat more pain and not solve anything
> in the end. Any advice would be helpful.

Go for a second opinion from a specialist- some local vets are quick to
extract the cats' teeth (and your cash)-- although sometimes a full-mouth
extraction is the only cure.

Here's some information you won't find on the web:

http://maxshouse.com/Stomatitis%20and%20Faucitis.htm

http://maxshouse.com/feline_stomatitis_and_faucitis_debowes.htm


Best of luck,

Phil

KittiKat
November 18th 06, 05:37 PM
Thanks everyone unfortunately no vet college *close* by (one about 8
hours away driving distance, but to put the cat through hell of another
road trip right now would be inhumane). I will call a few clinics on
Monday, there are 5 or 6 cat clinics here, my vet owns one, but I can
and will phone the others and see what they recommend.

Second Question- Should I keep my cat on the Antirobe anyway? I can't
see how it can hurt - even if I do not go with this vet and get the
extractions done, my cat will need some type of dental exam under
anethesia in the next few weeks.

Additionally, is stress related to this disease? The cat has been under
a tremendous amount of stress over the last 6 months - first a 3 day
road trip, temporarily moving to new place out of state for several
months and living with a dog who hated cats, and then to top it off,
back to her old place, on an eight hour plane ride in cargo. The cat
has only been at home, in her *familiar* territory for about 3 weeks.
As for the eosnophil, her skin flares under stress but then settles -
Could the gum inflammation settle down as well on its own????


Phil P. wrote:
> "KittiKat" > wrote in message
> ups.com...
> > Hi All,
> >
> > I need some advice - Several weeks ago I noticed that my cat's gums had
> > become very red and inflammed. I look at her mouth fairly regularly and
> > was surprised to see this inflammation. She is still eating, but is
> > leaving some food during the second feeding, and occassionally has been
> > pawing at her mouth. Still is grooming herself, playing, seems to be
> > the old her, but is sleeping a little more than usual, and sometimes is
> > grouchy with the other cat, which concerned me. So today I brought her
> > to the vet. The vet stated that my cat does have some gingivitis but
> > not nearly enough to warrant the degree of gum inflammation that my cat
> > has.
>
> Some cats develop reactions to plaque- especially at the gumline. Any amount
> can cause a reaction.
>
>
> Additionally, the vet said the back of my cat's throat is red in
> > appearance. Now the vet is unsure of what may be causing this,
>
> Eosinophilic complex can cause inflammation of the buccal mucosa and
> glossopalatine arches-- its all part of the feline stomatitis/faucitis
> complex. Is he unsure of what's causing the faucitis or the eosinophilic
> complex? The latter is probably causing the former.
>
> so a
> > full panel blood workup was ordered to rule out other prolems, like
> > leukemia, anemia, etc, that may be impairing my cats immune system and
> > causing the increased reaction in her mouth. My cat already has
> > eosnophil granuloma and many allergies and her mouth has some
> > granuloma's due to this condition, but, nothing new, she's had this for
> > 5 years or so. My vet mentioned that the cat may have stomatitis but is
> > *not sure*.
>
> It definitely sounds like stomatitis/faucitis. Cats can have varying degrees
> of inflammation- but its still stomatitis/faucitis.
>
>
> Right now the cat has been prescribed Antirobe 25 mg twice
> > a day and metacam for a few days for pain. The plan is to take my cat
> > in next Tuesday to do full dental surgery, which may include
> > extraction. I am really freaking out over this, as my vet is not sure
> > what is causing this problem and wants to operate and take my cats
> > teeth out. When I look at her teeth they look very white, with little
> > tartar or plaque, and yes, I am not a vet, but her teeth do not look
> > that bad. If it is Stomatitis would it not be better to do a full
> > dental exam and biopsy, before proceeding???
>
>
> Absotively!
>
>
> Is there not a first line
> > of treatment that is taken before proceeding to teeth extraction?
>
>
> Immunosuppressive doses of steroids are usually tried first- but long term
> steroid therapy can lead to complications of their own.
>
>
> > Addtionally, would I be wrong in getting a second opinion?
>
> Absotively! Search for an AVDC Diplomate in your aera:
> http://www.avdc-dms.org/dms/diplomates.cfm
>
>
> I hate to
> > say this, but I feel that this clinic, a one veterinarian business, may
> > be looking out for the best interest of the business rather than my
> > cat's well being. The quote on the surgery is also mind blowing.
>
>
> After the new 3-year vaccination guidelines were published in 2000- a lot of
> vets raised all their fees to make up for the loss in revenue. Some vets
> just got carried away. I know a few who nearly doubled their fees!
>
>
> I love
> > my cat and would pay any amount, but I do not want to be paying for
> > needless surgery that may cause my cat more pain and not solve anything
> > in the end. Any advice would be helpful.
>
> Go for a second opinion from a specialist- some local vets are quick to
> extract the cats' teeth (and your cash)-- although sometimes a full-mouth
> extraction is the only cure.
>
> Here's some information you won't find on the web:
>
> http://maxshouse.com/Stomatitis%20and%20Faucitis.htm
>
> http://maxshouse.com/feline_stomatitis_and_faucitis_debowes.htm
>
>
> Best of luck,
>
> Phil

BarB
November 19th 06, 06:16 PM
On 17 Nov 2006 22:04:34 -0800, "KittiKat" > wrote:

> The plan is to take my cat
>in next Tuesday to do full dental surgery, which may include
>extraction. I am really freaking out over this, as my vet is not sure
>what is causing this problem and wants to operate and take my cats
>teeth out. When I look at her teeth they look very white, with little
>tartar or plaque, and yes, I am not a vet, but her teeth do not look
>that bad. If it is Stomatitis would it not be better to do a full
>dental exam and biopsy, before proceeding???

Our rescue group has a cat with stomatitis returned to us when the
adopter felt she could not afford treatment and was going to have her
euthanized. Our vet did a biopsy at the same time as the dental and
removed several bad teeth. The biopsy's an added expense, but done at
the same time as the dental it obviates the need for a second round
of anesthetic. However the cause of stomatitis can be difficult to
impossible to determine. Little Shrimp's results came back
"stomatitis of unknown origin". Right now I'm trying to keep her
stress free and eliminate possible food allergies, but she requires a
steroid shot every 5 weeks to keep her out of pain.

>Is there not a first line
>of treatment that is taken before proceeding to teeth extraction?

Steroid shots are usually used but they can have serious long-term
effects. If you can find the cause it would be best.

>Addtionally, would I be wrong in getting a second opinion?

So far it sounds to me as if your vet is proceeding properly. I
think if he were out to maximize his profit he might have suggested
the biopsy be done at the same time. However a second opinion is
always worthwhile and your vet should be more than willing to have
you do that.

>I hate to
>say this, but I feel that this clinic, a one veterinarian business, may
>be looking out for the best interest of the business rather than my
>cat's well being.

If your relationship with this vet is not good, then you need to look
for another. This is particularly true for a cat that is probably
going to require frequent visits.


>The quote on the surgery is also mind blowing. I love
>my cat and would pay any amount, but I do not want to be paying for
>needless surgery that may cause my cat more pain and not solve anything
>in the end. Any advice would be helpful.

I'd suggest, if you stick with this vet, that you request the biopsy
as well as the removal of any bad teeth.

BarB