PDA

View Full Version : Where Do They Go? What Do They Do?


EADGBE
November 25th 06, 03:16 AM
I have a couple of indoor-outdoor cats. One is a white cat and the
other is a Siamese cat. They are both trained to come to me when I
whistle for them.

They are both male cats, and they are both NEUTERED.

The white cat spends about half his time indoors, but the Siamese is
almost completely an outdoor cat.

The white cat ALWAYS comes inside at night. During the warmer months,
the Siamese NEVER comes in at night, but during the colder months, the
Siamese does come in at night.

Now that it has started to get colder, I whistle for both of the cats
just before I go to bed. The white cat usually comes running almost
immediately, but there are times when I do NOT see the Siamese cat at
all, and I simply have to leave him outside all night. Once in a great
while, NEITHER cat comes to me at all, and I have to leave them both
outside. I hate to leave either one of them outside because I hate the
thought of them being cold all night long, but I have to get to bed and
I can't afford to look for them all night.

MY QUESTION: Both of these cats do NOT go further than 2 houses away
from my house. I can whistle during the day and they both come running
up to me. BUT WHAT ARE THEY DOING AT NIGHT THAT WOULD CAUSE THEM TO
IGNORE ME WHEN I CALL THEM? WHAT ARE SOME POSSIBLE "HIDING" PLACES?
Why would a cat prefer to stay outside in the cold instead of coming
into a warm house?

I am just curious where they are when I can't find them. I live in a
typical neighborhood setting.

November 25th 06, 07:02 AM
EADGBE wrote:
> I have a couple of indoor-outdoor cats. One is a white cat and the
> other is a Siamese cat. They are both trained to come to me when I
> whistle for them.
>
> They are both male cats, and they are both NEUTERED.
>
> The white cat spends about half his time indoors, but the Siamese is
> almost completely an outdoor cat.
>
> The white cat ALWAYS comes inside at night. During the warmer months,
> the Siamese NEVER comes in at night, but during the colder months, the
> Siamese does come in at night.
>
> Now that it has started to get colder, I whistle for both of the cats
> just before I go to bed. The white cat usually comes running almost
> immediately, but there are times when I do NOT see the Siamese cat at
> all, and I simply have to leave him outside all night. Once in a great
> while, NEITHER cat comes to me at all, and I have to leave them both
> outside. I hate to leave either one of them outside because I hate the
> thought of them being cold all night long, but I have to get to bed and
> I can't afford to look for them all night.
>
> MY QUESTION: Both of these cats do NOT go further than 2 houses away
> from my house. I can whistle during the day and they both come running
> up to me. BUT WHAT ARE THEY DOING AT NIGHT THAT WOULD CAUSE THEM TO
> IGNORE ME WHEN I CALL THEM? WHAT ARE SOME POSSIBLE "HIDING" PLACES?
> Why would a cat prefer to stay outside in the cold instead of coming
> into a warm house?
>
> I am just curious where they are when I can't find them. I live in a
> typical neighborhood setting.

I'll tell you exactly where they are. They are under a bush somewhere
watching you hunt them and ignoring you. Seriously. And what are they
doing? Maybe scrapping with other cats. Probably hunting. The hunting
is better at night and particularly on a still night with a full moon,
they've got way too important things on their minds than you.
I don't live in town, but I used to spend a lot of time hunting cats
down beginning at dusk. I"ve *seen* them hiding from me.
Still, you gotta make them come inside. It's just too dangerous at
night for cats. The best trick I have to offer is to NOT feed them
until they come in. A hungry cat is much easier to round up and bring
inside.

Sherry

Spot
November 25th 06, 12:09 PM
It's too dangerous for them to be outside day or night. You can make their
life a whole lot safer by converting them to inside cats or building a
secure enclosure that they can go out into during the day.

Celeste

> wrote in message
ups.com...
>
> EADGBE wrote:
>> I have a couple of indoor-outdoor cats. One is a white cat and the
>> other is a Siamese cat. They are both trained to come to me when I
>> whistle for them.
>>
>> They are both male cats, and they are both NEUTERED.
>>
>> The white cat spends about half his time indoors, but the Siamese is
>> almost completely an outdoor cat.
>>
>> The white cat ALWAYS comes inside at night. During the warmer months,
>> the Siamese NEVER comes in at night, but during the colder months, the
>> Siamese does come in at night.
>>
>> Now that it has started to get colder, I whistle for both of the cats
>> just before I go to bed. The white cat usually comes running almost
>> immediately, but there are times when I do NOT see the Siamese cat at
>> all, and I simply have to leave him outside all night. Once in a great
>> while, NEITHER cat comes to me at all, and I have to leave them both
>> outside. I hate to leave either one of them outside because I hate the
>> thought of them being cold all night long, but I have to get to bed and
>> I can't afford to look for them all night.
>>
>> MY QUESTION: Both of these cats do NOT go further than 2 houses away
>> from my house. I can whistle during the day and they both come running
>> up to me. BUT WHAT ARE THEY DOING AT NIGHT THAT WOULD CAUSE THEM TO
>> IGNORE ME WHEN I CALL THEM? WHAT ARE SOME POSSIBLE "HIDING" PLACES?
>> Why would a cat prefer to stay outside in the cold instead of coming
>> into a warm house?
>>
>> I am just curious where they are when I can't find them. I live in a
>> typical neighborhood setting.
>
> I'll tell you exactly where they are. They are under a bush somewhere
> watching you hunt them and ignoring you. Seriously. And what are they
> doing? Maybe scrapping with other cats. Probably hunting. The hunting
> is better at night and particularly on a still night with a full moon,
> they've got way too important things on their minds than you.
> I don't live in town, but I used to spend a lot of time hunting cats
> down beginning at dusk. I"ve *seen* them hiding from me.
> Still, you gotta make them come inside. It's just too dangerous at
> night for cats. The best trick I have to offer is to NOT feed them
> until they come in. A hungry cat is much easier to round up and bring
> inside.
>
> Sherry
>