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m4816k
November 25th 06, 09:12 AM
OK, I'm not making this up. What today happened was that my cat (he's almost
6 months old) ate his breakfast (dry food) so fast that he threw it up
almost immediately. The thing is, in the morning he's very active and wants
to play, so my guess is that he just couldn't wait to jump on me, play hide
& seek or "catch me if you can", which resulted in vomiting. Of course, my
question is: how do I prevent it from happening again?! Thanks!

M

Buddy's Mom
November 25th 06, 10:57 AM
Feed him canned food - it is better for him. And feed him less food at
a time.

m4816k wrote:
> OK, I'm not making this up. What today happened was that my cat (he's almost
> 6 months old) ate his breakfast (dry food) so fast that he threw it up
> almost immediately. The thing is, in the morning he's very active and wants
> to play, so my guess is that he just couldn't wait to jump on me, play hide
> & seek or "catch me if you can", which resulted in vomiting. Of course, my
> question is: how do I prevent it from happening again?! Thanks!
>
> M

barb
November 25th 06, 07:11 PM
My Pickles was wolfing down her canned food, too, so fast that every
morning came the big throw-up routine. I ended up feeding her a bit at a
time for a couple of months. It meant a lot of bending down and up but
probably good for the waistline! In time she learned to pace herself and
didn't need the special treatment any more. No more throwing up.

--
Barb
Of course I don't look busy,
I did it right the first time.

AK
November 25th 06, 10:53 PM
"m4816k" > wrote in message
...
> OK, I'm not making this up. What today happened was that my cat (he's
> almost 6 months old) ate his breakfast (dry food) so fast that he threw it
> up almost immediately. The thing is, in the morning he's very active and
> wants to play, so my guess is that he just couldn't wait to jump on me,
> play hide & seek or "catch me if you can", which resulted in vomiting. Of
> course, my question is: how do I prevent it from happening again?! Thanks!


I have a Siamese and they are infamous for eating too quickly so Royal Canin
make a special food for Siamese which is larger kibble so they are forced to
chew it. Of course your kitten will still be on kitten food which is
smaller anyway, you may find that when he's on adult food the problems will
go away, or if not you can then try the Siamese food.

jmc
November 28th 06, 11:32 AM
Suddenly, without warning, m4816k exclaimed (25-Nov-06 6:42 PM):
> OK, I'm not making this up. What today happened was that my cat (he's almost
> 6 months old) ate his breakfast (dry food) so fast that he threw it up
> almost immediately. The thing is, in the morning he's very active and wants
> to play, so my guess is that he just couldn't wait to jump on me, play hide
> & seek or "catch me if you can", which resulted in vomiting. Of course, my
> question is: how do I prevent it from happening again?! Thanks!
>
> M
>
>
The first thing that comes into mind is to get some nice, smooth stones
- two or three would do - boil them for a bit, and then put them in the
food bowl. They have to be big enough that your cat can't swallow them
by accident, but small enough to move around to get at the food.

I've used this method for horses that bolt their food, don't see why it
can't work for cats too, if you don't have the time available for the
preferred method of smaller, more frequent meals.

jmc