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Lynnette Miller
November 26th 06, 01:21 AM
Hi. I just signed up for this newsgroup. I specifically looked for it since
I was having some trouble with a sick kitten and thought I would just jump
in.

I was away on a trip for work and when I came home I noticed that my kitten
had a distended belly. This was about 2 weeks ago today.

He had been neutered a month before and had been taking it pretty easy since
then. I figured that he was just wiped out from the neutering although my
other cats always bounced back quickly. He has always been a laid back
kitten and although he was really skinny, he had a good appetite. We free
feed so he could eat whenever he wanted. The vet said he was fine when we
took him in for the neutering.

When I was scrubbing out the litter boxes, he jumped in one and peed. It
looked really concentrated so I dipped his urine. (I work in a lab mostly
dealing with human specimens although we do run some vet samples.) He had
blood in his urine so I thought that maybe he picked up a bladder infection
when he was neutered and thought that was maybe why he was so blah. But when
I mentioned my concern for the distended belly to the vet, he asked if he
could tap it. He said from the appearance of the fluid it appeared that my
kitten had FIP.

I had been checking things out on the internet before taking him to the vet
and thought this is really bad. He told me that Nash was contagious to my
other cats and pretty much suggested that I should to have him put down
right then.

From what I read, Nash probably had picked up the virus before he came to
live with us and when he was neutered his immunity was compromised enough to
cause this disease to progress.

Since Nash wasn't in any pain and had a good appetite, I opted to treat him
for the bladder infection. And then I decided that we would treat the other
symptoms, so I asked the vet for Lasix and prednisone.

This past Tuesday I thought I was going to lose him. He seemed to be having
little seizures. He was out of it and a mess. My other cats were coming
around which freaked me out because they become very protective when one of
them is really sick, sick enough to die.

For more than a week I was giving him kitten replacement milk and basically
anything else he would eat with his medicine. He was having trouble walking,
but he would let out a cry when he had to use the litterbox. I would take
him to it and hold him up. He would do a scratch or two and pee or poop.
What a great cat!

To get him to eat I used every trick in the book and then some. He was still
interested enough to do some grooming so I would put a couple drops of milk
on his foot and he would lick it off. Then I would stick a syringe in the
way and he would lick the milk off of that. I thought I would go nuts giving
him 5ml of milk at a time and I wasn't sure if he was getting enough. I also
read that if he would become too dehydrated, he would be nauseous and less
likely to eat or drink anything so at times I did have to force him to
drink.

Last night when I got home from work, he was very alert. He was sitting up
and looking around. He would eat a little of anything you put in front of
him. He is still very unsteady on his feet so I am thinking that IF what he
had was actually FIP, there is some nervous system involvement. Survival for
FIP infected cats showing symptoms is only 5% according to anything I can
find on the net. But is this because the cat is euthanized before the
disease progresses? I can understand that because it is not a pretty sight
and quite heartbreaking. But since I work in the medical field, I see what
we do to people to keep them alive. I would certainly stop if Nash wasn't
showing any improvement and had no appetite.

We had lost, in the past year, 2 dogs to old age and a young cat to an
unknown problem that lead to liver and kidney disease. Two years before that
we lost 2 cats to old age. I wasn't giving up on Nash, and as my husband
knows now, neither was he. Nash is too young

Anyway, I do actually have a question or two. Does anyone here have any
experience with FIP? Mostly there are problems where there is a larger
population of cats--shelters, catteries, etc. My vet has an employee who
breeds cats and he says every 2-3 years, she has a cat with FIP which dies
(euthanized?).

Also, it now appears that Nash has yeast in his urine. It is probably due to
the combination of the antibiotics and prednisone messing with his immunity.
Has anyone ever had a cat with yeast in his urine?

I do plan on calling the vet since he told me to call if I needed anything,
but I thought I would check here. Also, I want to get a good urine specimen
to take to the vet so he can check it out. Currently, there is no blood in
the urine but it still looks concentrated. I am just hoping this whole
ordeal hasn't caused any permanent kidney or other organ damage.

I also plan on asking about subcutaneous fluid injections versus IV to help
get and keep him hydrated. Not that my vet isn't really great and
supportive, but I just don't want Nash at the vet getting IV. I want him
home. Two of my cats died at the vet. Not that I blame them. I want Nash
home. That probably sounds really selfish but I'd like to think that Nash
would want to be with us at home instead of with strangers--no matter the
outcome.

Has anyone ever given their cats this kind of fluid injections? I have given
my cats and dogs vaccines before and I have no problem doing that.

I appreciate any responses and advice. My brain is fried from surfing the
net.

Thanks
Lynn

Wendy
November 26th 06, 03:23 AM
So sorry to hear about your kitty. FIP is a horrible thing to have to deal
with. I lost two of my fosters around this time last year to FIP shortly
after they were adopted. Don't know where they picked up the Corona virus as
I don't let my fosters share litter boxes with unrelated (not littermates)
cats. Who knows they may have already been exposed before they were rescued.
Stress appears to be one of the triggers that causes FCoV to mutate into
FIP. The rescue group I work with has been very lucky to only have a very
few cases of FIP over the years but in most cases it's occurred either
shortly after adoption or when the cat is spayed or neutered.

At any rate the tricky part is diagnosing FIP. Here's a link that might be
helpful if you haven't seen it already. It will give you the combination of
test results that are needed to get as close as one can to a diagnosis of
this disease.

http://www.dr-addie.com/WhatIsFIP.htm

Hope your kitty has something else.

W



"Lynnette Miller" > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> Hi. I just signed up for this newsgroup. I specifically looked for it
> since I was having some trouble with a sick kitten and thought I would
> just jump in.
>
> I was away on a trip for work and when I came home I noticed that my
> kitten had a distended belly. This was about 2 weeks ago today.
>
> He had been neutered a month before and had been taking it pretty easy
> since then. I figured that he was just wiped out from the neutering
> although my other cats always bounced back quickly. He has always been a
> laid back kitten and although he was really skinny, he had a good
> appetite. We free feed so he could eat whenever he wanted. The vet said he
> was fine when we took him in for the neutering.
>
> When I was scrubbing out the litter boxes, he jumped in one and peed. It
> looked really concentrated so I dipped his urine. (I work in a lab mostly
> dealing with human specimens although we do run some vet samples.) He had
> blood in his urine so I thought that maybe he picked up a bladder
> infection when he was neutered and thought that was maybe why he was so
> blah. But when I mentioned my concern for the distended belly to the vet,
> he asked if he could tap it. He said from the appearance of the fluid it
> appeared that my kitten had FIP.
>
> I had been checking things out on the internet before taking him to the
> vet and thought this is really bad. He told me that Nash was contagious to
> my other cats and pretty much suggested that I should to have him put down
> right then.
>
> From what I read, Nash probably had picked up the virus before he came to
> live with us and when he was neutered his immunity was compromised enough
> to cause this disease to progress.
>
> Since Nash wasn't in any pain and had a good appetite, I opted to treat
> him for the bladder infection. And then I decided that we would treat the
> other symptoms, so I asked the vet for Lasix and prednisone.
>
> This past Tuesday I thought I was going to lose him. He seemed to be
> having little seizures. He was out of it and a mess. My other cats were
> coming around which freaked me out because they become very protective
> when one of them is really sick, sick enough to die.
>
> For more than a week I was giving him kitten replacement milk and
> basically anything else he would eat with his medicine. He was having
> trouble walking, but he would let out a cry when he had to use the
> litterbox. I would take him to it and hold him up. He would do a scratch
> or two and pee or poop. What a great cat!
>
> To get him to eat I used every trick in the book and then some. He was
> still interested enough to do some grooming so I would put a couple drops
> of milk on his foot and he would lick it off. Then I would stick a syringe
> in the way and he would lick the milk off of that. I thought I would go
> nuts giving him 5ml of milk at a time and I wasn't sure if he was getting
> enough. I also read that if he would become too dehydrated, he would be
> nauseous and less likely to eat or drink anything so at times I did have
> to force him to drink.
>
> Last night when I got home from work, he was very alert. He was sitting up
> and looking around. He would eat a little of anything you put in front of
> him. He is still very unsteady on his feet so I am thinking that IF what
> he had was actually FIP, there is some nervous system involvement.
> Survival for FIP infected cats showing symptoms is only 5% according to
> anything I can find on the net. But is this because the cat is euthanized
> before the disease progresses? I can understand that because it is not a
> pretty sight and quite heartbreaking. But since I work in the medical
> field, I see what we do to people to keep them alive. I would certainly
> stop if Nash wasn't showing any improvement and had no appetite.
>
> We had lost, in the past year, 2 dogs to old age and a young cat to an
> unknown problem that lead to liver and kidney disease. Two years before
> that we lost 2 cats to old age. I wasn't giving up on Nash, and as my
> husband knows now, neither was he. Nash is too young
>
> Anyway, I do actually have a question or two. Does anyone here have any
> experience with FIP? Mostly there are problems where there is a larger
> population of cats--shelters, catteries, etc. My vet has an employee who
> breeds cats and he says every 2-3 years, she has a cat with FIP which dies
> (euthanized?).
>
> Also, it now appears that Nash has yeast in his urine. It is probably due
> to the combination of the antibiotics and prednisone messing with his
> immunity. Has anyone ever had a cat with yeast in his urine?
>
> I do plan on calling the vet since he told me to call if I needed
> anything, but I thought I would check here. Also, I want to get a good
> urine specimen to take to the vet so he can check it out. Currently, there
> is no blood in the urine but it still looks concentrated. I am just hoping
> this whole ordeal hasn't caused any permanent kidney or other organ
> damage.
>
> I also plan on asking about subcutaneous fluid injections versus IV to
> help get and keep him hydrated. Not that my vet isn't really great and
> supportive, but I just don't want Nash at the vet getting IV. I want him
> home. Two of my cats died at the vet. Not that I blame them. I want Nash
> home. That probably sounds really selfish but I'd like to think that Nash
> would want to be with us at home instead of with strangers--no matter the
> outcome.
>
> Has anyone ever given their cats this kind of fluid injections? I have
> given my cats and dogs vaccines before and I have no problem doing that.
>
> I appreciate any responses and advice. My brain is fried from surfing the
> net.
>
> Thanks
> Lynn
>
>
>

-L.
November 26th 06, 07:20 AM
Lynnette Miller wrote:
> Hi. I just signed up for this newsgroup. I specifically looked for it since
> I was having some trouble with a sick kitten and thought I would just jump
> in.
>
> I was away on a trip for work and when I came home I noticed that my kitten
> had a distended belly. This was about 2 weeks ago today.
>
> He had been neutered a month before and had been taking it pretty easy since
> then. I figured that he was just wiped out from the neutering although my
> other cats always bounced back quickly. He has always been a laid back
> kitten and although he was really skinny, he had a good appetite. We free
> feed so he could eat whenever he wanted. The vet said he was fine when we
> took him in for the neutering.
>
> When I was scrubbing out the litter boxes, he jumped in one and peed. It
> looked really concentrated so I dipped his urine. (I work in a lab mostly
> dealing with human specimens although we do run some vet samples.) He had
> blood in his urine so I thought that maybe he picked up a bladder infection
> when he was neutered and thought that was maybe why he was so blah. But when
> I mentioned my concern for the distended belly to the vet, he asked if he
> could tap it. He said from the appearance of the fluid it appeared that my
> kitten had FIP.
>
> I had been checking things out on the internet before taking him to the vet
> and thought this is really bad. He told me that Nash was contagious to my
> other cats and pretty much suggested that I should to have him put down
> right then.
>
> From what I read, Nash probably had picked up the virus before he came to
> live with us and when he was neutered his immunity was compromised enough to
> cause this disease to progress.
>
> Since Nash wasn't in any pain and had a good appetite, I opted to treat him
> for the bladder infection. And then I decided that we would treat the other
> symptoms, so I asked the vet for Lasix and prednisone.
>
> This past Tuesday I thought I was going to lose him. He seemed to be having
> little seizures. He was out of it and a mess. My other cats were coming
> around which freaked me out because they become very protective when one of
> them is really sick, sick enough to die.
>
> For more than a week I was giving him kitten replacement milk and basically
> anything else he would eat with his medicine. He was having trouble walking,
> but he would let out a cry when he had to use the litterbox. I would take
> him to it and hold him up. He would do a scratch or two and pee or poop.
> What a great cat!
>
> To get him to eat I used every trick in the book and then some. He was still
> interested enough to do some grooming so I would put a couple drops of milk
> on his foot and he would lick it off. Then I would stick a syringe in the
> way and he would lick the milk off of that. I thought I would go nuts giving
> him 5ml of milk at a time and I wasn't sure if he was getting enough. I also
> read that if he would become too dehydrated, he would be nauseous and less
> likely to eat or drink anything so at times I did have to force him to
> drink.
>
> Last night when I got home from work, he was very alert. He was sitting up
> and looking around. He would eat a little of anything you put in front of
> him. He is still very unsteady on his feet so I am thinking that IF what he
> had was actually FIP, there is some nervous system involvement. Survival for
> FIP infected cats showing symptoms is only 5% according to anything I can
> find on the net. But is this because the cat is euthanized before the
> disease progresses?

Probably. When I worked as a vet tech we euthed every FIP suspect that
came in.

>I can understand that because it is not a pretty sight
> and quite heartbreaking.

Once they get to the seizure stage it really is somewhat cruel not to
euthanize them. I give you credit for hanging in, but honestly I would
have euthanized him.


>But since I work in the medical field, I see what
> we do to people to keep them alive. I would certainly stop if Nash wasn't
> showing any improvement and had no appetite.
>
> We had lost, in the past year, 2 dogs to old age and a young cat to an
> unknown problem that lead to liver and kidney disease. Two years before that
> we lost 2 cats to old age. I wasn't giving up on Nash, and as my husband
> knows now, neither was he. Nash is too young
>
> Anyway, I do actually have a question or two. Does anyone here have any
> experience with FIP? Mostly there are problems where there is a larger
> population of cats--shelters, catteries, etc. My vet has an employee who
> breeds cats and he says every 2-3 years, she has a cat with FIP which dies
> (euthanized?).

FIP is a virus. The cat has to be exposed to get the disease. It runs
in populations - sometimes a colony will spread it for awhile and all
the kittens will die off, Then it won't be seen for another couple of
years.

>
> Also, it now appears that Nash has yeast in his urine. It is probably due to
> the combination of the antibiotics and prednisone messing with his immunity.
> Has anyone ever had a cat with yeast in his urine?

Not common - I don't think I have ever seen it. Are you sure it's
yeast you are seeing and not white blood cells?

>
> I do plan on calling the vet since he told me to call if I needed anything,
> but I thought I would check here. Also, I want to get a good urine specimen
> to take to the vet so he can check it out. Currently, there is no blood in
> the urine but it still looks concentrated. I am just hoping this whole
> ordeal hasn't caused any permanent kidney or other organ damage.

I'd be giving him sub-Q fluids at home.

>
> I also plan on asking about subcutaneous fluid injections versus IV to help
> get and keep him hydrated.

LOL...great minds think alike!

>Not that my vet isn't really great and
> supportive, but I just don't want Nash at the vet getting IV. I want him
> home. Two of my cats died at the vet. Not that I blame them. I want Nash
> home. That probably sounds really selfish but I'd like to think that Nash
> would want to be with us at home instead of with strangers--no matter the
> outcome.
>
> Has anyone ever given their cats this kind of fluid injections? I have given
> my cats and dogs vaccines before and I have no problem doing that.

It's done all the time. It's not as effective nor the same as as IV
nutrition - if he's on IV for fluids only, you can probably switch to
Sub-Q, but if it's nutritional supplementation, he needs an IV.

>
> I appreciate any responses and advice. My brain is fried from surfing the
> net.

Sounds like he is on the upswing. Good luck!

-L.

Rhonda
November 26th 06, 08:27 AM
Lynnette Miller wrote:
> I also plan on asking about subcutaneous fluid injections versus IV to help
> get and keep him hydrated. Not that my vet isn't really great and
> supportive, but I just don't want Nash at the vet getting IV. I want him
> home. Two of my cats died at the vet. Not that I blame them. I want Nash
> home. That probably sounds really selfish but I'd like to think that Nash
> would want to be with us at home instead of with strangers--no matter the
> outcome.
>
> Has anyone ever given their cats this kind of fluid injections? I have given
> my cats and dogs vaccines before and I have no problem doing that.
>
> I appreciate any responses and advice. My brain is fried from surfing the
> net.

Wow, Lynn, I'm so impressed with your dedication to your kitty! He's so
lucky to have ended up with you.

I have no experience with FIP, but we have given sick cats sub-cu at
home. Other than the icky part of sticking in the needle, it is pretty
easy. After you're done, pinch the skin together for a few minutes --
the area where the needle went in. The fluids make a pretty sizable
bulge under the skin and we've had fluids squirt back out.

Good luck with your guy. It sounds like he has a good chance with you.
Let us know.

Rhonda

Phil P.
November 26th 06, 03:02 PM
"Lynnette Miller" > wrote in message
news:[email protected]

> I mentioned my concern for the distended belly to the vet, he asked if he
> could tap it. He said from the appearance of the fluid it appeared that my
> kitten had FIP.


Appearance isn't always reliable. Since the vet already had a fluid sample,
why didn't he send it out for analysis and protein determinations?

Was any bloodwork done? TP? Globulin? Are his eyes clear? any changes? Does
he have a fever- flucutuating/non-responsive?

>
> I had been checking things out on the internet before taking him to the
vet
> and thought this is really bad. He told me that Nash was contagious to my
> other cats and pretty much suggested that I should to have him put down
> right then.


Bad advice based on outdated information. FIP is not nearly as contagious
as it was once believed to be. Horizontal transmission, i.e., cat-to-cat
transfer is the exception rather than the rule.

I strongly suggest you order a full work up- CBC & chemscreen before you
settle on a diagnosis of FIP. He may (probably) has some other treatable
disease.

Best of luck,

Phil

Wendy
November 26th 06, 04:08 PM
"Phil P." > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
>
> "Lynnette Miller" > wrote in message
> news:[email protected]
>
>> I mentioned my concern for the distended belly to the vet, he asked if he
>> could tap it. He said from the appearance of the fluid it appeared that
>> my
>> kitten had FIP.
>
>
> Appearance isn't always reliable. Since the vet already had a fluid
> sample,
> why didn't he send it out for analysis and protein determinations?
>
> Was any bloodwork done? TP? Globulin? Are his eyes clear? any changes?
> Does
> he have a fever- flucutuating/non-responsive?
>
>>
>> I had been checking things out on the internet before taking him to the
> vet
>> and thought this is really bad. He told me that Nash was contagious to my
>> other cats and pretty much suggested that I should to have him put down
>> right then.
>
>
> Bad advice based on outdated information. FIP is not nearly as contagious
> as it was once believed to be. Horizontal transmission, i.e., cat-to-cat
> transfer is the exception rather than the rule.
>
> I strongly suggest you order a full work up- CBC & chemscreen before you
> settle on a diagnosis of FIP. He may (probably) has some other treatable
> disease.
>
> Best of luck,
>
> Phil
>
>
If they didn't test the effusion an opportunity was missed to get a pretty
certain diagnosis.

From Dr. Addie's site:

Total protein in the effusion and albumin:globulin ratio (A:G)
The total protein concentration in the effusion of a cat with FIP is usually
greater than 35 g/l and this usually consists of more globulin than albumin,
pushing down the A:G ratio. An A:G of < 0.4 indicates FIP is quite likely;
an A:G of >0.8 rules out FIP; A:G of between 0.4-0.8 - consider other
parameters. The A:G of an effusion is one of the most useful tests to
perform in practice for a quick indicator of whether or not a cat may have
FIP and can be performed on a VetTest machine (divide the albumin by the
globulin values).


A cat with wet FIP should be FCoV seropositive, the total protein of the
effusion must be over 35g/l and the albumin:globulin less than 0.4 (or at
least less than 0.8), the AGP should be high (over 1500 micrograms/ml) and
the cytology should reveal few nucleated cells which are mainly neutrophils
and macrophages.

A cat with dry FIP should have a high FCoV antibody titre, be
hyperglobulinaemic and have a reduced albumin:globulin ratio. He or she
should have a high AGP, lymphopenia, a haematocrit of less than 30% which is
non-regenerative and possibly a neutrophilia. Clinically, the cat should
have lost weight and will usually have ocular signs such as iritis, retinal
vessel cuffing, keratic precipitates, aqueous or vitreous flare

meeee
November 27th 06, 02:26 AM
(((Lynette))) I feel so bad for you. But what you are doing for Nash is
wonderful, thankyou for not giving up on him. I don't know as much about
this as others on the group, but my thoughts are with you and nash and I am
wishing you all the best.

"Lynnette Miller" > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> Hi. I just signed up for this newsgroup. I specifically looked for it
> since I was having some trouble with a sick kitten and thought I would
> just jump in.
>
> I was away on a trip for work and when I came home I noticed that my
> kitten had a distended belly. This was about 2 weeks ago today.
>
> He had been neutered a month before and had been taking it pretty easy
> since then. I figured that he was just wiped out from the neutering
> although my other cats always bounced back quickly. He has always been a
> laid back kitten and although he was really skinny, he had a good
> appetite. We free feed so he could eat whenever he wanted. The vet said he
> was fine when we took him in for the neutering.
>
> When I was scrubbing out the litter boxes, he jumped in one and peed. It
> looked really concentrated so I dipped his urine. (I work in a lab mostly
> dealing with human specimens although we do run some vet samples.) He had
> blood in his urine so I thought that maybe he picked up a bladder
> infection when he was neutered and thought that was maybe why he was so
> blah. But when I mentioned my concern for the distended belly to the vet,
> he asked if he could tap it. He said from the appearance of the fluid it
> appeared that my kitten had FIP.
>
> I had been checking things out on the internet before taking him to the
> vet and thought this is really bad. He told me that Nash was contagious to
> my other cats and pretty much suggested that I should to have him put down
> right then.
>
> From what I read, Nash probably had picked up the virus before he came to
> live with us and when he was neutered his immunity was compromised enough
> to cause this disease to progress.
>
> Since Nash wasn't in any pain and had a good appetite, I opted to treat
> him for the bladder infection. And then I decided that we would treat the
> other symptoms, so I asked the vet for Lasix and prednisone.
>
> This past Tuesday I thought I was going to lose him. He seemed to be
> having little seizures. He was out of it and a mess. My other cats were
> coming around which freaked me out because they become very protective
> when one of them is really sick, sick enough to die.
>
> For more than a week I was giving him kitten replacement milk and
> basically anything else he would eat with his medicine. He was having
> trouble walking, but he would let out a cry when he had to use the
> litterbox. I would take him to it and hold him up. He would do a scratch
> or two and pee or poop. What a great cat!
>
> To get him to eat I used every trick in the book and then some. He was
> still interested enough to do some grooming so I would put a couple drops
> of milk on his foot and he would lick it off. Then I would stick a syringe
> in the way and he would lick the milk off of that. I thought I would go
> nuts giving him 5ml of milk at a time and I wasn't sure if he was getting
> enough. I also read that if he would become too dehydrated, he would be
> nauseous and less likely to eat or drink anything so at times I did have
> to force him to drink.
>
> Last night when I got home from work, he was very alert. He was sitting up
> and looking around. He would eat a little of anything you put in front of
> him. He is still very unsteady on his feet so I am thinking that IF what
> he had was actually FIP, there is some nervous system involvement.
> Survival for FIP infected cats showing symptoms is only 5% according to
> anything I can find on the net. But is this because the cat is euthanized
> before the disease progresses? I can understand that because it is not a
> pretty sight and quite heartbreaking. But since I work in the medical
> field, I see what we do to people to keep them alive. I would certainly
> stop if Nash wasn't showing any improvement and had no appetite.
>
> We had lost, in the past year, 2 dogs to old age and a young cat to an
> unknown problem that lead to liver and kidney disease. Two years before
> that we lost 2 cats to old age. I wasn't giving up on Nash, and as my
> husband knows now, neither was he. Nash is too young
>
> Anyway, I do actually have a question or two. Does anyone here have any
> experience with FIP? Mostly there are problems where there is a larger
> population of cats--shelters, catteries, etc. My vet has an employee who
> breeds cats and he says every 2-3 years, she has a cat with FIP which dies
> (euthanized?).
>
> Also, it now appears that Nash has yeast in his urine. It is probably due
> to the combination of the antibiotics and prednisone messing with his
> immunity. Has anyone ever had a cat with yeast in his urine?
>
> I do plan on calling the vet since he told me to call if I needed
> anything, but I thought I would check here. Also, I want to get a good
> urine specimen to take to the vet so he can check it out. Currently, there
> is no blood in the urine but it still looks concentrated. I am just hoping
> this whole ordeal hasn't caused any permanent kidney or other organ
> damage.
>
> I also plan on asking about subcutaneous fluid injections versus IV to
> help get and keep him hydrated. Not that my vet isn't really great and
> supportive, but I just don't want Nash at the vet getting IV. I want him
> home. Two of my cats died at the vet. Not that I blame them. I want Nash
> home. That probably sounds really selfish but I'd like to think that Nash
> would want to be with us at home instead of with strangers--no matter the
> outcome.
>
> Has anyone ever given their cats this kind of fluid injections? I have
> given my cats and dogs vaccines before and I have no problem doing that.
>
> I appreciate any responses and advice. My brain is fried from surfing the
> net.
>
> Thanks
> Lynn
>
>
>