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lovemm
November 28th 06, 12:26 PM
My kitten, Susie Q was born with a hernia. It's quite large and
protrudes from her abdomen. The vet suggested that I push it back in
periodically which I did, however, she also has a sibling who plays
with her and it got to the point that the hernia was even turning red.
Until she is of age to be spayed, her hernia will not be corrected so
here's what I've done and it's rather ingenious, if I do say so myself.
I cut the foot part from a sock and placed the other part around her
middle. She's a himalayan and since she is fluffy she sort of looks
like a bolt of yarn which puffs out on either end. Because she's been
wearing this make shift bandage since she's been about 8wks and she is
now nearly 4mths, she wears it like a second skin. Of course sometimes
it gets pulled, and dirty and needs to be re-adjusted or changed, but
it manages to keep her hernia in, and keeps her from harming herself.

Today, I will develop some pics I've taken and will send one for a
follow-up

Phil P.
November 29th 06, 07:03 PM
"lovemm" > wrote in message
ups.com...
> My kitten, Susie Q was born with a hernia. It's quite large and
> protrudes from her abdomen. The vet suggested that I push it back in
> periodically which I did, however, she also has a sibling who plays
> with her and it got to the point that the hernia was even turning red.
> Until she is of age to be spayed, her hernia will not be corrected so
> here's what I've done and it's rather ingenious, if I do say so myself.
> I cut the foot part from a sock and placed the other part around her
> middle.

That's a commonly used technique to keep a cat from chewing out abdominal
sutures. Its also used on cats with PEG tubes to cover the incision area
and hold the feeding end of the tube in place. Sorry to rain on your parade.



She's a himalayan and since she is fluffy she sort of looks
> like a bolt of yarn which puffs out on either end. Because she's been
> wearing this make shift bandage since she's been about 8wks and she is
> now nearly 4mths,

She's definitely old enough to be neutered *now*. The older she gets the
more abdominal muscle and fat she'll have that the vet must cut through-
which makes the surgery more traumatic. Healing will also take longer.

I don't know which kind of hernia she has. My guess is its an umbilical
hernia- probably caused by her mother being too rough tearing off the
umbilical cord. If she does have an umbilical hernia, the intestines or
liver can protrude through the opening and become strangled. If it a
diaphragmatic hernia, her abdominal organs can move into the chest cavity.
If I were you I wouldn't wait another second to get her neutered and the
hernia repaired.

lovemm
December 1st 06, 08:20 PM
Phil P. wrote:
> "lovemm" > wrote in message
> ups.com...
> > My kitten, Susie Q was born with a hernia. It's quite large and
> > protrudes from her abdomen. The vet suggested that I push it back in
> > periodically which I did, however, she also has a sibling who plays
> > with her and it got to the point that the hernia was even turning red.
> > Until she is of age to be spayed, her hernia will not be corrected so
> > here's what I've done and it's rather ingenious, if I do say so myself.
> > I cut the foot part from a sock and placed the other part around her
> > middle.
>
> That's a commonly used technique to keep a cat from chewing out abdominal
> sutures. Its also used on cats with PEG tubes to cover the incision area
> and hold the feeding end of the tube in place. Sorry to rain on your parade.
>
>
>
> She's a himalayan and since she is fluffy she sort of looks
> > like a bolt of yarn which puffs out on either end. Because she's been
> > wearing this make shift bandage since she's been about 8wks and she is
> > now nearly 4mths,
>
> She's definitely old enough to be neutered *now*. The older she gets the
> more abdominal muscle and fat she'll have that the vet must cut through-
> which makes the surgery more traumatic. Healing will also take longer.
>
> I don't know which kind of hernia she has. My guess is its an umbilical
> hernia- probably caused by her mother being too rough tearing off the
> umbilical cord. If she does have an umbilical hernia, the intestines or
> liver can protrude through the opening and become strangled. If it a
> diaphragmatic hernia, her abdominal organs can move into the chest cavity.
> If I were you I wouldn't wait another second to get her neutered and the
> hernia repaired.

lovemm
December 1st 06, 08:29 PM
Phil P. wrote:
> "lovemm" > wrote in message
> ups.com...
> > My kitten, Susie Q was born with a hernia. It's quite large and
> > protrudes from her abdomen. The vet suggested that I push it back in
> > periodically which I did, however, she also has a sibling who plays
> > with her and it got to the point that the hernia was even turning red.
> > Until she is of age to be spayed, her hernia will not be corrected so
> > here's what I've done and it's rather ingenious, if I do say so myself.
> > I cut the foot part from a sock and placed the other part around her
> > middle.
>
> That's a commonly used technique to keep a cat from chewing out abdominal
> sutures. Its also used on cats with PEG tubes to cover the incision area
> and hold the feeding end of the tube in place. Sorry to rain on your parade.
>
>
>
> She's a himalayan and since she is fluffy she sort of looks
> > like a bolt of yarn which puffs out on either end. Because she's been
> > wearing this make shift bandage since she's been about 8wks and she is
> > now nearly 4mths,
>
> She's definitely old enough to be neutered *now*. The older she gets the
> more abdominal muscle and fat she'll have that the vet must cut through-
> which makes the surgery more traumatic. Healing will also take longer.
>
> I don't know which kind of hernia she has. My guess is its an umbilical
> hernia- probably caused by her mother being too rough tearing off the
> umbilical cord. If she does have an umbilical hernia, the intestines or
> liver can protrude through the opening and become strangled. If it a
> diaphragmatic hernia, her abdominal organs can move into the chest cavity.
> If I were you I wouldn't wait another second to get her neutered and the
> hernia repaired.
Unfortunately, where I come from the vets will only spay kittens when
they are 6 mos or older, and it's not suggested that you put them
through more surgeries than neccesary.
The make-shift bandage is, however protecting her adequately and I'm
satisfied that she will come to no harm.