PDA

View Full Version : See you later, Pooka!


Roby
December 1st 06, 11:11 PM
In 1994, I adopted a 4-month old brown tabby kitten. I named
him Pooka, taken from "Puccha" - the Sanskrit word for cat, so
says my Purina cat book. I fell in love with Pooka the moment
I first saw him, and he seemed to feel the same about me. We
were exactly right for each other.

Pooka grew up to be a very handsome fellow, with subtle markings
in brown and black and remarkably soft fur. He had more than a
little Maine Coon in him and that wonderfully gentle spirit they
have. He was my best friend, my constant companion, my kid in a
fur coat. We had many happy years together.

This morning, I took Pooka to the vet for that last time. Cancer
had taken its toll on my beloved pal and it was clear that he was
no longer enjoying life. He passed away quietly and gently, just
as he had lived. He was the best.

I know I'll see him again.

Gail
December 1st 06, 11:14 PM
I'm sorry for your loss. I think you will see him again.
Gail
"Roby" > wrote in message
...
> In 1994, I adopted a 4-month old brown tabby kitten. I named
> him Pooka, taken from "Puccha" - the Sanskrit word for cat, so
> says my Purina cat book. I fell in love with Pooka the moment
> I first saw him, and he seemed to feel the same about me. We
> were exactly right for each other.
>
> Pooka grew up to be a very handsome fellow, with subtle markings
> in brown and black and remarkably soft fur. He had more than a
> little Maine Coon in him and that wonderfully gentle spirit they
> have. He was my best friend, my constant companion, my kid in a
> fur coat. We had many happy years together.
>
> This morning, I took Pooka to the vet for that last time. Cancer
> had taken its toll on my beloved pal and it was clear that he was
> no longer enjoying life. He passed away quietly and gently, just
> as he had lived. He was the best.
>
> I know I'll see him again.

mlbriggs
December 1st 06, 11:30 PM
On Fri, 01 Dec 2006 17:11:34 -0500, Roby wrote:

> In 1994, I adopted a 4-month old brown tabby kitten. I named
> him Pooka, taken from "Puccha" - the Sanskrit word for cat, so
> says my Purina cat book. I fell in love with Pooka the moment
> I first saw him, and he seemed to feel the same about me. We
> were exactly right for each other.
>
> Pooka grew up to be a very handsome fellow, with subtle markings
> in brown and black and remarkably soft fur. He had more than a
> little Maine Coon in him and that wonderfully gentle spirit they
> have. He was my best friend, my constant companion, my kid in a
> fur coat. We had many happy years together.
>
> This morning, I took Pooka to the vet for that last time. Cancer
> had taken its toll on my beloved pal and it was clear that he was
> no longer enjoying life. He passed away quietly and gently, just
> as he had lived. He was the best.
>
> I know I'll see him again.


"...Rise up slowly, Angel. It's hard to let you go..."
Sincere condolences. MLB

cybercat
December 1st 06, 11:33 PM
"Roby" > wrote in message
...
> In 1994, I adopted a 4-month old brown tabby kitten. I named
> him Pooka, taken from "Puccha" - the Sanskrit word for cat, so
> says my Purina cat book. I fell in love with Pooka the moment
> I first saw him, and he seemed to feel the same about me. We
> were exactly right for each other.
>
> Pooka grew up to be a very handsome fellow, with subtle markings
> in brown and black and remarkably soft fur. He had more than a
> little Maine Coon in him and that wonderfully gentle spirit they
> have. He was my best friend, my constant companion, my kid in a
> fur coat. We had many happy years together.
>
> This morning, I took Pooka to the vet for that last time. Cancer
> had taken its toll on my beloved pal and it was clear that he was
> no longer enjoying life. He passed away quietly and gently, just
> as he had lived. He was the best.
>
> I know I'll see him again.

He sounds wonderful, and like he could not have found a better
friend than you. I am sorry for your loss.

T
December 1st 06, 11:35 PM
In article >, [email protected]
address.net says...
> In 1994, I adopted a 4-month old brown tabby kitten. I named
> him Pooka, taken from "Puccha" - the Sanskrit word for cat, so
> says my Purina cat book. I fell in love with Pooka the moment
> I first saw him, and he seemed to feel the same about me. We
> were exactly right for each other.
>
> Pooka grew up to be a very handsome fellow, with subtle markings
> in brown and black and remarkably soft fur. He had more than a
> little Maine Coon in him and that wonderfully gentle spirit they
> have. He was my best friend, my constant companion, my kid in a
> fur coat. We had many happy years together.
>
> This morning, I took Pooka to the vet for that last time. Cancer
> had taken its toll on my beloved pal and it was clear that he was
> no longer enjoying life. He passed away quietly and gently, just
> as he had lived. He was the best.
>
> I know I'll see him again.
>

Sorry to hear but he had some good years I'm sure. My condolences.

blkcatgal
December 1st 06, 11:42 PM
I'm sorry for your loss. I hope the good memories help you through this
tough time.

S.

"Roby" > wrote in message
...
> In 1994, I adopted a 4-month old brown tabby kitten. I named
> him Pooka, taken from "Puccha" - the Sanskrit word for cat, so
> says my Purina cat book. I fell in love with Pooka the moment
> I first saw him, and he seemed to feel the same about me. We
> were exactly right for each other.
>
> Pooka grew up to be a very handsome fellow, with subtle markings
> in brown and black and remarkably soft fur. He had more than a
> little Maine Coon in him and that wonderfully gentle spirit they
> have. He was my best friend, my constant companion, my kid in a
> fur coat. We had many happy years together.
>
> This morning, I took Pooka to the vet for that last time. Cancer
> had taken its toll on my beloved pal and it was clear that he was
> no longer enjoying life. He passed away quietly and gently, just
> as he had lived. He was the best.
>
> I know I'll see him again.

Buddy's Mom
December 1st 06, 11:53 PM
So sorry to hear. Maine Coon's gentleness is something else, isn't it?
Almost like they are human.

Roby wrote:
> In 1994, I adopted a 4-month old brown tabby kitten. I named
> him Pooka, taken from "Puccha" - the Sanskrit word for cat, so
> says my Purina cat book. I fell in love with Pooka the moment
> I first saw him, and he seemed to feel the same about me. We
> were exactly right for each other.
>
> Pooka grew up to be a very handsome fellow, with subtle markings
> in brown and black and remarkably soft fur. He had more than a
> little Maine Coon in him and that wonderfully gentle spirit they
> have. He was my best friend, my constant companion, my kid in a
> fur coat. We had many happy years together.
>
> This morning, I took Pooka to the vet for that last time. Cancer
> had taken its toll on my beloved pal and it was clear that he was
> no longer enjoying life. He passed away quietly and gently, just
> as he had lived. He was the best.
>
> I know I'll see him again.

Roby
December 2nd 06, 02:07 PM
Thank you all!

barb
December 2nd 06, 06:05 PM
Pooka and you were lucky to have each other and you gave him a gentle end.
Some day, again...

--
Barb
Of course I don't look busy,
I did it right the first time.

Eva Quesnell
December 2nd 06, 11:05 PM
On Fri, 1 Dec 2006, Roby wrote:

> In 1994, I adopted a 4-month old brown tabby kitten. I named
> him Pooka, taken from "Puccha" - the Sanskrit word for cat, so
> says my Purina cat book. I fell in love with Pooka the moment
> I first saw him, and he seemed to feel the same about me. We
> were exactly right for each other.
>
> Pooka grew up to be a very handsome fellow, with subtle markings
> in brown and black and remarkably soft fur. He had more than a
> little Maine Coon in him and that wonderfully gentle spirit they
> have. He was my best friend, my constant companion, my kid in a
> fur coat. We had many happy years together.
>
> This morning, I took Pooka to the vet for that last time. Cancer
> had taken its toll on my beloved pal and it was clear that he was
> no longer enjoying life. He passed away quietly and gently, just
> as he had lived. He was the best.
>
> I know I'll see him again.

Rest easy in knowing you did right by him to the very end. It sounds like
he was a wonderful kitty, and I believe you will see him again. You can
hold him close in your heart. I'm sorry you had to lose him, but take
heart and joy from having him with you all those years. Remember the good
times. Rest in peace, dear Pooka!

Eva

cybercat
December 3rd 06, 12:44 AM
"Roby" > wrote in message
...
> Thank you all!

Let us know when your heart is ready to take in another cat. So many need a
good owner like you.



--
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com

Roby
December 3rd 06, 01:48 AM
Eva Quesnell wrote:

> I'm sorry you had to lose him, but take heart and joy from having him with
you all those years. Remember the good times.

Thanks, Eva! He was the same age as your Chick. They're both waiting for
us over at the RB.

So far, I've sent six on ahead ... and have three more to watch over until
it's their time. Then I'll be done and ready to go too.

Roby

Roby
December 3rd 06, 03:58 PM
cybercat wrote:

> Let us know when your heart is ready to take in another cat. So many need
> a good owner like you.

Yesterday I visited a no-kill shelter. Their cat capacity is 100.
Right now, they have nearly 300 - some in-house, the rest in foster
homes. It's like that at all of the shelters around here. Low-cost
spay/neuter programs for low-income people ought to be no-cost and
low-cost for all others. My former vet is continually finding cats
dumped on her doorstep. She takes them all in, makes them hospital
residents: they're not available for adoption. Good heart, bad idea.
Last January, there were fifteen, many free to wander around the
hospital. Not a safe place for my cats to visit. I don't go there
anymore. Eventually, a new arrival will bring in panleuk and there
will be a disaster.

I didn't visit to adopt. I have three more at home. When they're
gone, no more ... I worry about what would become of them after
I'm gone (lotsa birthdays here): friends who love cats already have
as many as they can care for. I went to ask about volunteering.
Of course I looked at all the candidates; yes, rules can be bent.
A volunteer asked if I wanted to adopt a cat. I automatically told
her "I have four" ... and then corrected it to three and one I just
lost to cancer. She told me that the stress of several cats living
together causes cancer. That's rubbish. But it ruined my visit.

Roby

cybercat
December 3rd 06, 04:41 PM
"Roby" > wrote in message
...

>

>
> I didn't visit to adopt. I have three more at home. When they're
> gone, no more ... I worry about what would become of them after
> I'm gone (lotsa birthdays here): friends who love cats already have
> as many as they can care for.

I just wish everyone had a heart like yours, when it comes to cats.

I went to ask about volunteering.
> Of course I looked at all the candidates; yes, rules can be bent.
> A volunteer asked if I wanted to adopt a cat. I automatically told
> her "I have four" ... and then corrected it to three and one I just
> lost to cancer. She told me that the stress of several cats living
> together causes cancer. That's rubbish. But it ruined my visit.
>

What an idiot she is! I'm sorry she said that. I wish I were strong
enough to volunteer at a shelter--as it is, just going to one to adopt
my Gracie five years ago still haunts me--all those sweet little faces,
all looking at me like, "pick me!" and I could only take one. It's
too hard.



--
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com

Eva Quesnell
December 3rd 06, 04:56 PM
On Sat, 2 Dec 2006, Roby wrote:

> Eva Quesnell wrote:
>
>> I'm sorry you had to lose him, but take heart and joy from having him with
> you all those years. Remember the good times.
>
> Thanks, Eva! He was the same age as your Chick. They're both waiting for
> us over at the RB.

Maybe they're keeping each other company while they wait for us.

> So far, I've sent six on ahead ... and have three more to watch over until
> it's their time. Then I'll be done and ready to go too.
>
> Roby

Oh gosh, I've sent so many furbabies ahead to wait for me. I have three
here now, too. The oldest of those is 10. The other two are 7. I hope
to have many more years with them. I'll never be done with kitties, tho,
till they lay me down. It's hard to lose them. They leave such a big
hole in our lives. But we have to keep the memories of how they filled
our hearts while they were with us. I have a little video of Chick, and I
play it to hear her tiny little meow.

Eva

Eva Quesnell
December 3rd 06, 05:03 PM
On Sun, 3 Dec 2006, cybercat wrote:

>
> "Roby" > wrote in message
> ...
>>
>> I didn't visit to adopt. I have three more at home. When they're
>> gone, no more ... I worry about what would become of them after
>> I'm gone (lotsa birthdays here): friends who love cats already have
>> as many as they can care for.
>
> I just wish everyone had a heart like yours, when it comes to cats.
>
> I went to ask about volunteering.
>> Of course I looked at all the candidates; yes, rules can be bent.
>> A volunteer asked if I wanted to adopt a cat. I automatically told
>> her "I have four" ... and then corrected it to three and one I just
>> lost to cancer. She told me that the stress of several cats living
>> together causes cancer. That's rubbish. But it ruined my visit.
>>
>
> What an idiot she is! I'm sorry she said that. I wish I were strong
> enough to volunteer at a shelter--as it is, just going to one to adopt
> my Gracie five years ago still haunts me--all those sweet little faces,
> all looking at me like, "pick me!" and I could only take one. It's
> too hard.

That certainly *is* rubbish. Cats love having feline companionship. I
have two who are particularly in love. They are little soulmates. The
little female, Pandora, comes up to the big male, Mickey, and nuzzles him
until he starts grooming her face and ears. She grooms his neck while
he's doing this. Then she snuggles in closer, he loops an "arm" around
her, and they sleep soundly together. It's the cutest thing. It gives me
a total heart squeeze. :3

Eva

Matthew
December 3rd 06, 05:13 PM
I am sorry for your loss Roby

"Roby" > wrote in message
...
> In 1994, I adopted a 4-month old brown tabby kitten. I named
> him Pooka, taken from "Puccha" - the Sanskrit word for cat, so
> says my Purina cat book. I fell in love with Pooka the moment
> I first saw him, and he seemed to feel the same about me. We
> were exactly right for each other.
>
> Pooka grew up to be a very handsome fellow, with subtle markings
> in brown and black and remarkably soft fur. He had more than a
> little Maine Coon in him and that wonderfully gentle spirit they
> have. He was my best friend, my constant companion, my kid in a
> fur coat. We had many happy years together.
>
> This morning, I took Pooka to the vet for that last time. Cancer
> had taken its toll on my beloved pal and it was clear that he was
> no longer enjoying life. He passed away quietly and gently, just
> as he had lived. He was the best.
>
> I know I'll see him again.

Stick Waver
December 3rd 06, 07:37 PM
Eva Quesnell wrote:

> On Sun, 3 Dec 2006, cybercat wrote:
>
>>
>> "Roby" > wrote in message
>> ...
>>
>>>
>>> I didn't visit to adopt. I have three more at home. When they're
>>> gone, no more ... I worry about what would become of them after
>>> I'm gone (lotsa birthdays here): friends who love cats already have
>>> as many as they can care for.
>>
>>
>> I just wish everyone had a heart like yours, when it comes to cats.
>>
>> I went to ask about volunteering.
>>
>>> Of course I looked at all the candidates; yes, rules can be bent.
>>> A volunteer asked if I wanted to adopt a cat. I automatically told
>>> her "I have four" ... and then corrected it to three and one I just
>>> lost to cancer. She told me that the stress of several cats living
>>> together causes cancer. That's rubbish. But it ruined my visit.
>>>
>>
>> What an idiot she is! I'm sorry she said that. I wish I were strong
>> enough to volunteer at a shelter--as it is, just going to one to adopt
>> my Gracie five years ago still haunts me--all those sweet little faces,
>> all looking at me like, "pick me!" and I could only take one. It's
>> too hard.
>
>
> That certainly *is* rubbish. Cats love having feline companionship. I
> have two who are particularly in love. They are little soulmates. The
> little female, Pandora, comes up to the big male, Mickey, and nuzzles
> him until he starts grooming her face and ears. She grooms his neck
> while he's doing this. Then she snuggles in closer, he loops an "arm"
> around her, and they sleep soundly together. It's the cutest thing. It
> gives me a total heart squeeze. :3

My two boys are the same way :-)

Roby
December 3rd 06, 08:54 PM
Just got home from a visit to a very small shelter across
town. They had about a dozen cats and ten dogs. Today
was bring-yer-pet-to-get-a-picture-with-Santa day. Fun
to watch the owners try to get their furkids to pose!

Found a brown cat that reminded me of Pooka ... enough
to start the water-works. Kitty was a little damp after
our cuddling. Next door were two gray longhair kittens
that were toooooooo cute!! But I was strong. Enjoyed
the visit though.

Stopped at the shelter where I met Pooka twelve years ago.
Would you believe they're CLOSED on Sunday? Wow. Well,
another day.

My newly-appointed senior cat Clawde is occupying my lap
as I type. Clawde weighs 18 pounds, has no sideways. He
plans to open a chain of feline discount stores (Clawde-Mart).

Cats are wonderful.

Roby

CatNipped
December 4th 06, 09:21 PM
"Roby" > wrote in message
...
> cybercat wrote:
>
>> Let us know when your heart is ready to take in another cat. So many need
>> a good owner like you.
>
> Yesterday I visited a no-kill shelter. Their cat capacity is 100.
> Right now, they have nearly 300 - some in-house, the rest in foster
> homes. It's like that at all of the shelters around here. Low-cost
> spay/neuter programs for low-income people ought to be no-cost and
> low-cost for all others. My former vet is continually finding cats
> dumped on her doorstep. She takes them all in, makes them hospital
> residents: they're not available for adoption. Good heart, bad idea.
> Last January, there were fifteen, many free to wander around the
> hospital. Not a safe place for my cats to visit. I don't go there
> anymore. Eventually, a new arrival will bring in panleuk and there
> will be a disaster.
>
> I didn't visit to adopt. I have three more at home. When they're
> gone, no more ... I worry about what would become of them after
> I'm gone (lotsa birthdays here): friends who love cats already have
> as many as they can care for.

Yeah, that's how I feel. All my family seem to be "dog people" and I
wouldn't entrust my cats to their care at my demise. As hard as it is to
outlive a cat, the opposite is much harder to envision - nobody would spoil
my fur-babies the way I do. Sammy is now two and a half years old and I
won't adopt another kitten.

However, I am not adverse to adopting an older cat - say 9 or 10 - and
there's the added benefit of giving a home to a cat that would probably be
PTS otherwise since it seems only kittens and young cats have a chance of
being adopted from a shelter. I don't think I could live without a cat in
my life!

Hugs,

CatNipped

> I went to ask about volunteering.
> Of course I looked at all the candidates; yes, rules can be bent.
> A volunteer asked if I wanted to adopt a cat. I automatically told
> her "I have four" ... and then corrected it to three and one I just
> lost to cancer. She told me that the stress of several cats living
> together causes cancer. That's rubbish. But it ruined my visit.
>
> Roby
>
>

Roby
December 4th 06, 11:22 PM
CatNipped wrote:

> However, I am not adverse to adopting an older cat - say 9 or 10 - and
> there's the added benefit of giving a home to a cat that would probably be
> PTS otherwise since it seems only kittens and young cats have a chance of
> being adopted from a shelter. I don't think I could live without a cat in
> my life!

Shelters around here don't put cats over about 6-7 up for adoption. One is
an "open-door" shelter (i.e., all animals brought in are accepted), so I
guess the senior cats are just euthanized upon arrival. Another no-kill
shelter won't accept cats over age 8. Ah, the rewards of the twilight
years!

I think we need to start up a gated community restricted to responsible cat
owners. If you don't have a cat, we'll get you one (or several). When
your cat dies, we'll get you another. When you die, we'll put your cat(s)
back into the pool for the next available resident.

Roby

Buddy's Mom
December 4th 06, 11:41 PM
Count me into that gated community!!! When our last kitty died a
couple of years ago, I wasn't going to get another. Afraid I might not
live long enough and wouldn't trust anyone to take care of my kitty.
After a few months of being catless, I adopted a 3 year old. I am
praying that he and I go together!!!

I having seen cats for adoption at Petsmart who are 8 years old. I
have always commented about how awful that is to give up your 8 year
old cat!

Roby wrote:
> CatNipped wrote:
>
> > However, I am not adverse to adopting an older cat - say 9 or 10 - and
> > there's the added benefit of giving a home to a cat that would probably be
> > PTS otherwise since it seems only kittens and young cats have a chance of
> > being adopted from a shelter. I don't think I could live without a cat in
> > my life!
>
> Shelters around here don't put cats over about 6-7 up for adoption. One is
> an "open-door" shelter (i.e., all animals brought in are accepted), so I
> guess the senior cats are just euthanized upon arrival. Another no-kill
> shelter won't accept cats over age 8. Ah, the rewards of the twilight
> years!
>
> I think we need to start up a gated community restricted to responsible cat
> owners. If you don't have a cat, we'll get you one (or several). When
> your cat dies, we'll get you another. When you die, we'll put your cat(s)
> back into the pool for the next available resident.
>
> Roby

CatNipped
December 4th 06, 11:45 PM
"Roby" > wrote in message
...
> CatNipped wrote:
>
>> However, I am not adverse to adopting an older cat - say 9 or 10 - and
>> there's the added benefit of giving a home to a cat that would probably
>> be
>> PTS otherwise since it seems only kittens and young cats have a chance of
>> being adopted from a shelter. I don't think I could live without a cat
>> in
>> my life!
>
> Shelters around here don't put cats over about 6-7 up for adoption. One
> is
> an "open-door" shelter (i.e., all animals brought in are accepted), so I
> guess the senior cats are just euthanized upon arrival. Another no-kill
> shelter won't accept cats over age 8. Ah, the rewards of the twilight
> years!

Oh gawd, that's so sad! We adopted a 10-year-old from a no-kill shelter a
few years ago. We only had him for about 6 months before he had to be
euthanized (for acute kidney failure), but we at least made sure his last
months were good ones. His grave, with a small headstone, is under the oak
tree in our back yard, and we still miss him. It's a shame that more people
can't know the joy of rescuing an older cat.

> I think we need to start up a gated community restricted to responsible
> cat
> owners. If you don't have a cat, we'll get you one (or several). When
> your cat dies, we'll get you another. When you die, we'll put your cat(s)
> back into the pool for the next available resident.
>
> Roby

That *would* be wonderful!

Hugs,

CatNipped

2oz
December 5th 06, 12:52 AM
Roby wrote:

> I know I'll see him again.

that's a nice thought Roby

things change, but they do take time
i can say.. I would do it again.. that is..
take a cat in, love them, lose them.. then miss them

I think you come to where you see.. it was you, who got the better end
of the stick
at least that's what we say to ourselves

maybe you will bury him out in the yard

make sure you dig deep.. wouldn't want some dog bringing your buddy to
your front porch
(a week later)