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Maxine G
December 5th 06, 04:25 AM
Hi. We recently had a disastrous experience with adopting 2 cats. They peed
on the bed and sofa and we eventually had to send them back to their former
owner. It was heartbreaking.

We're about to try again with 2 different cats, and would like some advice
on the best strategies for "re-homing" cats.

I've heard it's a good idea to keep them in one room for the first few
days. How many days is a few? Should we spend time with them in there, or
leave them on their own at first?

There must be articles on this subject somewhere. Are they available
online?

Thanks in advance for your input.

-Maxine

--
mgusenet+this year at pcg dot net

Wendy
December 5th 06, 04:39 AM
Did you ever figure out what went wrong with the previous cats? Were they
checked out by the vet (with urine testing) to see if there was a medical
reason for their not using the box?

W

"Maxine G" > wrote in message
. 17.102...
> Hi. We recently had a disastrous experience with adopting 2 cats. They
> peed
> on the bed and sofa and we eventually had to send them back to their
> former
> owner. It was heartbreaking.
>
> We're about to try again with 2 different cats, and would like some advice
> on the best strategies for "re-homing" cats.
>
> I've heard it's a good idea to keep them in one room for the first few
> days. How many days is a few? Should we spend time with them in there, or
> leave them on their own at first?
>
> There must be articles on this subject somewhere. Are they available
> online?
>
> Thanks in advance for your input.
>
> -Maxine
>
> --
> mgusenet+this year at pcg dot net

Maxine
December 5th 06, 06:49 PM
It wasn't a physical problem because the cats didn't have the behavior
before or after we had them. I don't want to try to dig too deeply into
the psychology of THOSE cats, but to understand the best strategy for
the next ones.

Thanks,
Maxine

"Wendy" > wrote in
:

> Did you ever figure out what went wrong with the previous cats? Were
> they checked out by the vet (with urine testing) to see if there was a
> medical reason for their not using the box?
>
> W
>
> "Maxine G" > wrote in message
> . 17.102...
>> Hi. We recently had a disastrous experience with adopting 2 cats.
>> They peed
>> on the bed and sofa and we eventually had to send them back to their
>> former
>> owner. It was heartbreaking.
>>
>> We're about to try again with 2 different cats, and would like some
>> advice on the best strategies for "re-homing" cats.
>>
>> I've heard it's a good idea to keep them in one room for the first
>> few days. How many days is a few? Should we spend time with them in
>> there, or leave them on their own at first?
>>
>> There must be articles on this subject somewhere. Are they available
>> online?
>>
>> Thanks in advance for your input.
>>
>> -Maxine
>>
>> --
>> mgusenet+this year at pcg dot net
>
>
>

bookie
December 5th 06, 08:08 PM
Maxine wrote:
> It wasn't a physical problem because the cats didn't have the behavior
> before or after we had them. I don't want to try to dig too deeply into
> the psychology of THOSE cats, but to understand the best strategy for
> the next ones.
>
> Thanks,
> Maxine
>
you could try reading the excellent books by Vicky Halls, either Cat
Confidential or The Dat Detective, both of which are excellent at
describing behavioural problems in cats and thus helping you to
identify them in your own felines and sort any problems out with
minimal fuss. She describes a lot of case studies she has worked with
(she is an animal behaviourist or something) which have involved cats
spraying or eliminating in unsuitable places other than their litter
trays and these problems seem to be caused by stress in the cat, either
because the cat is in a new place and is unsettled or because there has
been a newcomer introduced to the house or whatever. Anyway, in the
books she not only describes the problem behaviours but also explains
why they occur and most importantly what you can do in order to prevent
it, without having to hand back your new feline friends to wherever
they came from which i think should really be a last resort.
Remember; cat's cannot speak for themselves so they cannot tell us or
express in ways which we may automatically understand that they are
stressed, scared, insecure or just unhappy. You have to look for signs
of this in any abnormal or unusual behaviour which they may undertake
which, despite being thoroughly antisocial and unpleasant to us, are
possibly the only coping mechanisms left to a very unhappy and stressed
out cat trying to come to terms with his new surroundings.
please read these books asap and give your new cats a chance

bookie
December 5th 06, 08:09 PM
Maxine wrote:
> It wasn't a physical problem because the cats didn't have the behavior
> before or after we had them. I don't want to try to dig too deeply into
> the psychology of THOSE cats, but to understand the best strategy for
> the next ones.
>
> Thanks,
> Maxine
>
you could try reading the excellent books by Vicky Halls, either Cat
Confidential or The Dat Detective, both of which are excellent at
describing behavioural problems in cats and thus helping you to
identify them in your own felines and sort any problems out with
minimal fuss. She describes a lot of case studies she has worked with
(she is an animal behaviourist or something) which have involved cats
spraying or eliminating in unsuitable places other than their litter
trays and these problems seem to be caused by stress in the cat, either
because the cat is in a new place and is unsettled or because there has
been a newcomer introduced to the house or whatever. Anyway, in the
books she not only describes the problem behaviours but also explains
why they occur and most importantly what you can do in order to prevent
it, without having to hand back your new feline friends to wherever
they came from which i think should really be a last resort.
Remember; cat's cannot speak for themselves so they cannot tell us or
express in ways which we may automatically understand that they are
stressed, scared, insecure or just unhappy. You have to look for signs
of this in any abnormal or unusual behaviour which they may undertake
which, despite being thoroughly antisocial and unpleasant to us, are
possibly the only coping mechanisms left to a very unhappy and stressed
out cat trying to come to terms with his new surroundings.
please read these books asap and give your new cats a chance

Maxine
December 5th 06, 08:47 PM
"bookie" > wrote in news:[email protected]
16g2000cwy.googlegroups.com:

>
> Maxine wrote:
>> It wasn't a physical problem because the cats didn't have the behavior
>> before or after we had them. I don't want to try to dig too deeply into
>> the psychology of THOSE cats, but to understand the best strategy for
>> the next ones.
>>
>> Thanks,
>> Maxine
>>
> you could try reading the excellent books by Vicky Halls, either Cat
> Confidential or The Dat Detective, both of which are excellent at
> describing behavioural problems in cats and thus helping you to
> identify them in your own felines and sort any problems out with
> minimal fuss. She describes a lot of case studies she has worked with
> (she is an animal behaviourist or something) which have involved cats
> spraying or eliminating in unsuitable places other than their litter
> trays and these problems seem to be caused by stress in the cat, either
> because the cat is in a new place and is unsettled or because there has
> been a newcomer introduced to the house or whatever. Anyway, in the
> books she not only describes the problem behaviours but also explains
> why they occur and most importantly what you can do in order to prevent
> it, without having to hand back your new feline friends to wherever
> they came from which i think should really be a last resort.
> Remember; cat's cannot speak for themselves so they cannot tell us or
> express in ways which we may automatically understand that they are
> stressed, scared, insecure or just unhappy. You have to look for signs
> of this in any abnormal or unusual behaviour which they may undertake
> which, despite being thoroughly antisocial and unpleasant to us, are
> possibly the only coping mechanisms left to a very unhappy and stressed
> out cat trying to come to terms with his new surroundings.
> please read these books asap and give your new cats a chance

Thanks. I will look for these books right away.

bookie
December 5th 06, 08:58 PM
Maxine wrote:
> "bookie" > wrote in news:[email protected]
> 16g2000cwy.googlegroups.com:
>
> >
> > Maxine wrote:
> >> It wasn't a physical problem because the cats didn't have the behavior
> >> before or after we had them. I don't want to try to dig too deeply into
> >> the psychology of THOSE cats, but to understand the best strategy for
> >> the next ones.
> >>
> >> Thanks,
> >> Maxine
> >>
> > you could try reading the excellent books by Vicky Halls, either Cat
> > Confidential or The Dat Detective, both of which are excellent at
> > describing behavioural problems in cats and thus helping you to
> > identify them in your own felines and sort any problems out with
> > minimal fuss. She describes a lot of case studies she has worked with
> > (she is an animal behaviourist or something) which have involved cats
> > spraying or eliminating in unsuitable places other than their litter
> > trays and these problems seem to be caused by stress in the cat, either
> > because the cat is in a new place and is unsettled or because there has
> > been a newcomer introduced to the house or whatever. Anyway, in the
> > books she not only describes the problem behaviours but also explains
> > why they occur and most importantly what you can do in order to prevent
> > it, without having to hand back your new feline friends to wherever
> > they came from which i think should really be a last resort.
> > Remember; cat's cannot speak for themselves so they cannot tell us or
> > express in ways which we may automatically understand that they are
> > stressed, scared, insecure or just unhappy. You have to look for signs
> > of this in any abnormal or unusual behaviour which they may undertake
> > which, despite being thoroughly antisocial and unpleasant to us, are
> > possibly the only coping mechanisms left to a very unhappy and stressed
> > out cat trying to come to terms with his new surroundings.
> > please read these books asap and give your new cats a chance
>
> Thanks. I will look for these books right away.
she has another one out at the minute called The Cat Counsellor or
similar, I have not read it (hoping santa will give it to me) but it is
probably written along similar lines. also if your cats' spraying
behaviour is down to stress then you could also try a feliway diffuser
which emits cat pheromones around the place and is thought to calm them
down a bit. I think you can get them from vets surgeries, bit like one
of those plug-in air freshener things, best of luck with it all

Wendy
December 5th 06, 11:51 PM
Well the reason I asked is if you had it confirmed at the vet (which
apparently you didn't) that it definitely wasn't a physical problem but a
behavioral one then you'd have to look to see if there was something in the
environment of your home that might have triggered the problem - an intact
stray hanging around outside for instance - and that might effect what you
need to do to bring in two more without having the same result.

W


"Maxine" > wrote in message
7.102...
> It wasn't a physical problem because the cats didn't have the behavior
> before or after we had them. I don't want to try to dig too deeply into
> the psychology of THOSE cats, but to understand the best strategy for
> the next ones.
>
> Thanks,
> Maxine
>
> "Wendy" > wrote in
> :
>
>> Did you ever figure out what went wrong with the previous cats? Were
>> they checked out by the vet (with urine testing) to see if there was a
>> medical reason for their not using the box?
>>
>> W
>>
>> "Maxine G" > wrote in message
>> . 17.102...
>>> Hi. We recently had a disastrous experience with adopting 2 cats.
>>> They peed
>>> on the bed and sofa and we eventually had to send them back to their
>>> former
>>> owner. It was heartbreaking.
>>>
>>> We're about to try again with 2 different cats, and would like some
>>> advice on the best strategies for "re-homing" cats.
>>>
>>> I've heard it's a good idea to keep them in one room for the first
>>> few days. How many days is a few? Should we spend time with them in
>>> there, or leave them on their own at first?
>>>
>>> There must be articles on this subject somewhere. Are they available
>>> online?
>>>
>>> Thanks in advance for your input.
>>>
>>> -Maxine
>>>
>>> --
>>> mgusenet+this year at pcg dot net
>>
>>
>>
>

2oz
December 6th 06, 01:10 AM
Maxine G wrote:
> Hi. We recently had a disastrous experience with adopting 2 cats. They peed
> on the bed and sofa and we eventually had to send them back to their former
> owner. It was heartbreaking.
>
> We're about to try again with 2 different cats,

hold it right there maxine
you're in a deep moral rut now

good luck digging your way out of this one

hell if anything.. dig out just to keep the chops up
otherwise, take the forthcoming fart inspectors with a grain of salt

HEY SOMEBODY PULL MY FINGER

Matthew
December 6th 06, 01:20 AM
"2oz" >

> HEY SOMEBODY PULL MY FINGER
>

HELL NO

Annie Wxill
December 6th 06, 01:42 AM
"Maxine" > wrote in message
7.102...
> It wasn't a physical problem because the cats didn't have the behavior
> before or after we had them. I don't want to try to dig too deeply into
> the psychology of THOSE cats, but to understand the best strategy for
> the next ones.
Thanks,
> Maxine

It sounds to me like the cats are fine, but have a problem with something in
your environment. It could have been as simple as the placement of the
litter box, or the type of litter, or the number of litter boxes, or
something else.

There are any number of books and information on the Web about litter box
problems. Perhaps you will be able to figure out what it is in your
environment that caused the cats to react that way. Doing this detective
work on your part will help you be better prepared for any future cats you
may bring into your home.

Also, please understand that cats are individuals and there is no absolute
blanket formula that applies to them all. If you bring new cats into your
home, you may have not problems at all. But if you do, a little patience
and detective work to find out what the cats are telling you will help you
and your cats create the happy family you want.

You appear to be a caring person, and that is the most important thing. You
can find the information you seek.

Good luck.

Annie

Lesley
December 10th 06, 12:36 AM
bookie wrote:


> >
> > Thanks. I will look for these books right away.
> she has another one out at the minute called The Cat Counsellor or
> similar,

Contains one of the funniest stories I've ever read (This year with
Dave in hospital I've made my own arrangements fro Xmas)
Spoiler warning...









She was called to deal with a cat who was no longer using her litter
box despite a previous unblemished record. The only thing she could
ascertain was that the family's dog had recently crossed the Bridge and
the family had rescued another dog they'd named "Ranger". They had
offered the dog a home as he had a previous history of interacting well
with cats but through at first dog and cat had existed happily the cat
had started to find odd corners to cr*p in all over the house.A vet
check revealed no problem to explain this...

Anyway she was taking the history and the slave had gone out to make a
cup of coffee and the little son of the slave informed her with great
solemnity that she shouldn't let Ranger lick her face because "He eats
the cats poo"

Sad fact. Dogs do this and what was happening was as the poor cat
(Sorry the books at work and I can't remember the name) was sitting
down to have a peaceful moment on the litter box and the dog was
standing there waiting for a warm, steaming treat! (UGH! Then again I
used to have rabbits and they produce two different turds. The first
one is partially digested and they eat that so they can extract
essential nutrients from it (I'd rather not think "Because they like
the taste") the second is as it were the final output). No wonder the
cat was trying not to use the box..

Apparently simple relocation of the box where the cat could have her
privacy and the dog couldn't reach her (I think they put the box in a
cupboard and fitted a cat flap and did have a couple of problems with
the dog still trying to get in and getting his head stuck)


Lesley

Slave of the Fabulous Furballs