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December 5th 06, 02:47 AM
Two cats have adopted us / our subusrban house. Their mother and a sib
are gone(probably killed by predator) We heard screeching one night
and somehow both of these survived. Not sure what is after them, we
have racoons and fox about.... Anyway, I have tried to capture them to
get them spayed and vaccinated, - no luck. They will eat from our
porch and venture in to the house or barn, but won't stay. I am
reluctant to trap them in as they are not at all acclimated to
confinement.
One has some drippy eye problem, both need shelter from our cold (NJ)
winter. I am clueless as to how to provide shelter without also
trapping them for predators....
Any advice very welkcome.

Gail
December 5th 06, 02:53 AM
Buy or rent a have a heart trap. This is the best thing you can do for them.
Have them spayed/neutered and given shots. You can then release them if you
believe they cannot be tamed. If you have a barn, you can set up a cardboard
box inside (with the top on) and cut a doorway in it. Provide straw inside
for them to stay warm. Feed them and provide water all winter. If you do not
have a barn, you can buy a dog house and place straw inside for warmth. Face
the doorway away from the north and west. By the way, Many unsocialized cats
can be tamed and will join a household given time and patience. This would
be the ideal solution, if possible.
Gail
> wrote in message
ups.com...
> Two cats have adopted us / our subusrban house. Their mother and a sib
> are gone(probably killed by predator) We heard screeching one night
> and somehow both of these survived. Not sure what is after them, we
> have racoons and fox about.... Anyway, I have tried to capture them to
> get them spayed and vaccinated, - no luck. They will eat from our
> porch and venture in to the house or barn, but won't stay. I am
> reluctant to trap them in as they are not at all acclimated to
> confinement.
> One has some drippy eye problem, both need shelter from our cold (NJ)
> winter. I am clueless as to how to provide shelter without also
> trapping them for predators....
> Any advice very welkcome.
>

Gail
December 5th 06, 02:55 AM
ps. Another option is to bring them in a garage (make sure they are safe
from your car) and provide a flap so they can go in and out. I would then
close the flap at night, if possible, so they would be safe from preditors.
I would still trap them with a have a heart and spayed/neutered, and given
their shots.
Gail
"Gail" > wrote in message
nk.net...
> Buy or rent a have a heart trap. This is the best thing you can do for
> them. Have them spayed/neutered and given shots. You can then release them
> if you believe they cannot be tamed. If you have a barn, you can set up a
> cardboard box inside (with the top on) and cut a doorway in it. Provide
> straw inside for them to stay warm. Feed them and provide water all
> winter. If you do not have a barn, you can buy a dog house and place straw
> inside for warmth. Face the doorway away from the north and west. By the
> way, Many unsocialized cats can be tamed and will join a household given
> time and patience. This would be the ideal solution, if possible.
> Gail
> > wrote in message
> ups.com...
>> Two cats have adopted us / our subusrban house. Their mother and a sib
>> are gone(probably killed by predator) We heard screeching one night
>> and somehow both of these survived. Not sure what is after them, we
>> have racoons and fox about.... Anyway, I have tried to capture them to
>> get them spayed and vaccinated, - no luck. They will eat from our
>> porch and venture in to the house or barn, but won't stay. I am
>> reluctant to trap them in as they are not at all acclimated to
>> confinement.
>> One has some drippy eye problem, both need shelter from our cold (NJ)
>> winter. I am clueless as to how to provide shelter without also
>> trapping them for predators....
>> Any advice very welkcome.
>>
>
>

December 5th 06, 03:27 AM
Gail, thanks for your reply. I have just ordered a trap and will get
them trapped and to a vet. I'm wondering how I'll trap one... then the
other. I will continue to try and introduce them to the warm side of
our barn (office and storage area is heated)
Do you know if they will use a litter box. They are about 4-6 months
old now. Thanks again for your reply and encouragement.

Cheryl
December 5th 06, 03:46 AM
On Mon 04 Dec 2006 10:27:02p, wrote in
rec.pets.cats.health+behav
ups.com>:

> Gail, thanks for your reply. I have just ordered a trap and
> will get them trapped and to a vet. I'm wondering how I'll trap
> one... then the other. I will continue to try and introduce
> them to the warm side of our barn (office and storage area is
> heated) Do you know if they will use a litter box. They are
> about 4-6 months old now. Thanks again for your reply and
> encouragement.

Very best wishes for luck. I wanted to touch on one thing you
originally asked, and I hope I understand right. About trapping a
cat and not turning it into prey ("provide shelter without also
trapping them for predators"). I could take that two ways: you
want to create a warm spot, but not an unsafe spot for kitty to
become prey while sleeping and hanging around, or maybe how to keep
the cat safe after it's trapped; still in the trap. I couldn't tell
which you mean. For the latter, you want to make sure that you
don't leave a trap unattendended.

Yes, ferals are impeccibly clean cats. I have a former that was
trapped and turned into a house cat at around 5-6 months old. She
is also the only cat I've ever had that has never clawed furniture.
She sticks to using carpet-covered scratching posts and the cat
trees I have. She never ever goes for anything else. My others
sometimes try other surfaces, and in front of me. She never does.

Good luck catching that kitty.

--
Cheryl

Gail
December 5th 06, 12:27 PM
Yes, they will use a litter box. Most cats will.
Good for you for helping them!! Use a smelly fish in the trap such as tuna
fish. You will catch them. Don't feed them anywhere else except the trap.
Gail
> wrote in message
ups.com...
>
>
> Gail, thanks for your reply. I have just ordered a trap and will get
> them trapped and to a vet. I'm wondering how I'll trap one... then the
> other. I will continue to try and introduce them to the warm side of
> our barn (office and storage area is heated)
> Do you know if they will use a litter box. They are about 4-6 months
> old now. Thanks again for your reply and encouragement.
>

Annie Wxill
December 6th 06, 12:24 AM
> wrote in message
ups.com...
.... I'm wondering how I'll trap one... then the
> other. I will continue to try and introduce them to the warm side of our
> barn (office and storage area is heated)
> Do you know if they will use a litter box. They are about 4-6 months
> old now. ...

Hi,
Cats are like heat-seeking missiles. I would expect they already know about
the heated office & storage area.

Our Rosie was 7-8 months old and totally wild when I trapped her in a
Hava-hart (spelling?) trap and brought her inside. She used the litter box
from the beginning.
At the suggestion of our vet, I trapped her in the evening and put her,
still in the trap, in our spare bathroom tub (without water, of course). The
next morning, I took her straight to the vet for spay, vaccinations, etc.
This prevented her from eating or drinking for the required time before
surgery. By leaving her in the trap, I'd be able to transport her the next
morning. No way would I be able to get her back into the trap or into a
travel crate if I let her out.

Good luck with your rescues.

Annie

December 6th 06, 08:33 PM
Thanks for the great news and encouragement. I am back with update due
to new development. One of the two is now limping about on three legs
so I enticed her into my barn office with fishy catfood. She is in
here meowing constantly, but at least safe and warm. Her sib is
outside. I will get her into a have-a-heart in morning for trip to
vet. ... Her/it's foot looks swollen... hope this ferril cat doen't
make me poor, lol.
Thanks again for the help.

22brix
December 7th 06, 12:01 AM
> wrote in message
ups.com...
> Thanks for the great news and encouragement. I am back with update due
> to new development. One of the two is now limping about on three legs
> so I enticed her into my barn office with fishy catfood. She is in
> here meowing constantly, but at least safe and warm. Her sib is
> outside. I will get her into a have-a-heart in morning for trip to
> vet. ... Her/it's foot looks swollen... hope this ferril cat doen't
> make me poor, lol.
> Thanks again for the help.
>

Thanks for caring enough to do something for them!
Bonnie

December 7th 06, 06:46 PM
Just a silly note now; this cat is amazing. You all were so right
about every single thing. A few days ago I could net approach them and
now after a day in my offfice area, the cat purrs and meows for
stroking and scratching, limps to food and water and uses the litter
box. It is amazing to me how easy they are to care for and love. I
will be devestated if this leg/paw problem is serious. Anyway, thanks
to you all who commented and offered support. I am 55 and have 7 kids.
My youngest (age 8) is my partner in this endeavor. We have grown
together over this silly little effort. What a gift these cats and
similar supportive efforts can be. Like most gift giving - its the
giver who gets the most.

Gail
December 7th 06, 08:06 PM
You are the BEST for helping these cats. They are not feral and have
responded quickly to love and attention.
Gail
> wrote in message
ups.com...
>
> Just a silly note now; this cat is amazing. You all were so right
> about every single thing. A few days ago I could net approach them and
> now after a day in my offfice area, the cat purrs and meows for
> stroking and scratching, limps to food and water and uses the litter
> box. It is amazing to me how easy they are to care for and love. I
> will be devestated if this leg/paw problem is serious. Anyway, thanks
> to you all who commented and offered support. I am 55 and have 7 kids.
> My youngest (age 8) is my partner in this endeavor. We have grown
> together over this silly little effort. What a gift these cats and
> similar supportive efforts can be. Like most gift giving - its the
> giver who gets the most.
>