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stonej
December 7th 06, 11:14 PM
A 77 year old woman was turned down for adoption of a cat at a local
rescue group, reason
given was that she was "too old" and it was their policy not to let
elderly people adopt but she
was told she could foster if she liked.

Not surprisingly she felt rather insulted by the whole situation. It
sounds like a possible case
of age discrimination to me.

Eva Quesnell
December 7th 06, 11:18 PM
On Thu, 7 Dec 2006, stonej wrote:

> A 77 year old woman was turned down for adoption of a cat at a local
> rescue group, reason
> given was that she was "too old" and it was their policy not to let
> elderly people adopt but she
> was told she could foster if she liked.
>
> Not surprisingly she felt rather insulted by the whole situation. It
> sounds like a possible case
> of age discrimination to me.

This ****es me off beyond words. I plan to have kitties till the day I
die. And I'll tell ya what, the day somebody tries to tell me I'm too old
is the day that person will be picking him/herself up off the floor after
being attacked by a crazed little old lady!

Eva

Gail
December 7th 06, 11:34 PM
Perhaps if she shows them that someone will take care of the cat if she
should die, they will let her. I am sure they are thinking that the cat will
probably outlive her and then what will happen to the animal.
Gail
"stonej" > wrote in message
ps.com...
>A 77 year old woman was turned down for adoption of a cat at a local
> rescue group, reason
> given was that she was "too old" and it was their policy not to let
> elderly people adopt but she
> was told she could foster if she liked.
>
> Not surprisingly she felt rather insulted by the whole situation. It
> sounds like a possible case
> of age discrimination to me.
>

Eva Quesnell
December 7th 06, 11:44 PM
On Thu, 7 Dec 2006, Gail wrote:

> Perhaps if she shows them that someone will take care of the cat if she
> should die, they will let her. I am sure they are thinking that the cat will
> probably outlive her and then what will happen to the animal.
> Gail

I have my cats covered in my will. It's a thing we all need to think
about. Life is short, and you never know.

Eva

> "stonej" > wrote in message
> ps.com...
>> A 77 year old woman was turned down for adoption of a cat at a local
>> rescue group, reason
>> given was that she was "too old" and it was their policy not to let
>> elderly people adopt but she
>> was told she could foster if she liked.
>>
>> Not surprisingly she felt rather insulted by the whole situation. It
>> sounds like a possible case
>> of age discrimination to me.
>>
>
>
>

stonej
December 7th 06, 11:52 PM
Gail wrote:
> Perhaps if she shows them that someone will take care of the cat if she
> should die, they will let her. I am sure they are thinking that the cat will
> probably outlive her and then what will happen to the animal.
> Gail
> "stonej" > wrote in message
> ps.com...
> >A 77 year old woman was turned down for adoption of a cat at a local
> > rescue group, reason
> > given was that she was "too old" and it was their policy not to let
> > elderly people adopt but she
> > was told she could foster if she liked.
> >
> > Not surprisingly she felt rather insulted by the whole situation. It
> > sounds like a possible case
> > of age discrimination to me.
> >


I suspect that is what they were thinking.
Talking about someone possibly dying is not a pleasant subject so that
might have
been why they didn't explain their reasons.

Matthew
December 7th 06, 11:55 PM
Confrontation plays a key in this some people don't like it.


"stonej" > wrote in message
ups.com...
>
> Gail wrote:
>> Perhaps if she shows them that someone will take care of the cat if she
>> should die, they will let her. I am sure they are thinking that the cat
>> will
>> probably outlive her and then what will happen to the animal.
>> Gail
>> "stonej" > wrote in message
>> ps.com...
>> >A 77 year old woman was turned down for adoption of a cat at a local
>> > rescue group, reason
>> > given was that she was "too old" and it was their policy not to let
>> > elderly people adopt but she
>> > was told she could foster if she liked.
>> >
>> > Not surprisingly she felt rather insulted by the whole situation. It
>> > sounds like a possible case
>> > of age discrimination to me.
>> >
>
>
> I suspect that is what they were thinking.
> Talking about someone possibly dying is not a pleasant subject so that
> might have
> been why they didn't explain their reasons.
>

December 7th 06, 11:59 PM
stonej wrote:
> A 77 year old woman was turned down for adoption of a cat at a local
> rescue group, reason
> given was that she was "too old" and it was their policy not to let
> elderly people adopt but she
> was told she could foster if she liked.
>
> Not surprisingly she felt rather insulted by the whole situation. It
> sounds like a possible case
> of age discrimination to me.

Maybe she appeared extremely feeble and they didn't think her capable
of living on her own much longer. In any case, had she come in with a
relative or friend who would agree to assume responsibility if she did
become unable to care for the cat, I bet they would have let her adopt
one. It's very sad that she was turned down. Pets are such a wonderful
thing for the elderly.
Sherry

MaryL
December 8th 06, 12:43 AM
"Eva Quesnell" > wrote in message
du...
> On Thu, 7 Dec 2006, Gail wrote:
>
>> Perhaps if she shows them that someone will take care of the cat if she
>> should die, they will let her. I am sure they are thinking that the cat
>> will
>> probably outlive her and then what will happen to the animal.
>> Gail
>
> I have my cats covered in my will. It's a thing we all need to think
> about. Life is short, and you never know.
>
> Eva
>
>>

So do I. A friend has agreed to take care of my cats if anything were to
happen to me (a friend who is as opposed as I am to declawing and who can be
depended on always to give them great care). I have left some money in my
will to her for the care of my furbabies.

I think a person of *any* age needs to make arrangements -- we never know
when something could happen to us.

MaryL

Matthew
December 8th 06, 12:48 AM
"MaryL" -OUT-THE-LITTER> wrote in message
...
>
> "Eva Quesnell" > wrote in message
> du...
>> On Thu, 7 Dec 2006, Gail wrote:
>>
>>> Perhaps if she shows them that someone will take care of the cat if she
>>> should die, they will let her. I am sure they are thinking that the cat
>>> will
>>> probably outlive her and then what will happen to the animal.
>>> Gail
>>
>> I have my cats covered in my will. It's a thing we all need to think
>> about. Life is short, and you never know.
>>
>> Eva
>>
>>>
>
> So do I. A friend has agreed to take care of my cats if anything were to
> happen to me (a friend who is as opposed as I am to declawing and who can
> be depended on always to give them great care). I have left some money in
> my will to her for the care of my furbabies.
>
> I think a person of *any* age needs to make arrangements -- we never know
> when something could happen to us.
>
> MaryL
>

Don't forget to carry a card just like a medical alert card saying you have
live animals and this person needed to be contacted in an emergency

My will has a clause in it that takes care of the furballs in case of my
death. they get a lot of money If I die. Had to have a special trust fund
made for them.

ChristyLynn
December 8th 06, 12:54 AM
That's terrible. I mean, old or not, anyone can go at any time. Regardless
of age. However, if its their policy, there isn't much you can do about it
except I would write a letter to the editorial section of a newspaper and
out the agency to the public. Maybe then they would change said policy.

MaryL
December 8th 06, 01:10 AM
"Matthew" > wrote in message
.. .
>
> "MaryL" -OUT-THE-LITTER> wrote in message
> ...
>>
>> "Eva Quesnell" > wrote in message
>> du...
>>> On Thu, 7 Dec 2006, Gail wrote:
>>>
>>>> Perhaps if she shows them that someone will take care of the cat if she
>>>> should die, they will let her. I am sure they are thinking that the cat
>>>> will
>>>> probably outlive her and then what will happen to the animal.
>>>> Gail
>>>
>>> I have my cats covered in my will. It's a thing we all need to think
>>> about. Life is short, and you never know.
>>>
>>> Eva
>>>
>>>>
>>
>> So do I. A friend has agreed to take care of my cats if anything were to
>> happen to me (a friend who is as opposed as I am to declawing and who can
>> be depended on always to give them great care). I have left some money
>> in my will to her for the care of my furbabies.
>>
>> I think a person of *any* age needs to make arrangements -- we never know
>> when something could happen to us.
>>
>> MaryL
>>
>
> Don't forget to carry a card just like a medical alert card saying you
> have live animals and this person needed to be contacted in an emergency
>
> My will has a clause in it that takes care of the furballs in case of my
> death. they get a lot of money If I die. Had to have a special trust
> fund made for them.
>

Yes, thanks for the reminder. I think that is very important. I do have a
medical alert card, and it includes information about my two furbabies
(including reference to the fact that Duffy is blind).

MaryL

Wendy
December 8th 06, 01:37 AM
That probably is their concern. If this person listed someone who is
committed to taking care of the cat in the event the woman is no longer able
to it might make a difference. They might also be more inclined to adopt an
older cat to her rather than a kitten too.

The fact remains that the rescue groups' purpose is to be an advocate for
the cat. They would want a reasonable expectation that the cat will have a
lifelong home.


W

"Gail" > wrote in message
ink.net...
> Perhaps if she shows them that someone will take care of the cat if she
> should die, they will let her. I am sure they are thinking that the cat
> will probably outlive her and then what will happen to the animal.
> Gail
> "stonej" > wrote in message
> ps.com...
>>A 77 year old woman was turned down for adoption of a cat at a local
>> rescue group, reason
>> given was that she was "too old" and it was their policy not to let
>> elderly people adopt but she
>> was told she could foster if she liked.
>>
>> Not surprisingly she felt rather insulted by the whole situation. It
>> sounds like a possible case
>> of age discrimination to me.
>>
>
>

2oz
December 8th 06, 02:39 AM
stonej wrote:

> Not surprisingly she felt rather insulted by the whole situation. It
> sounds like a possible case
> of age discrimination to me.

that's just awful

the way I see it..

free food is free food

i mean.. the old woman was willing to feed and spend money

i disagree with them

hey, I tell ya.

the old thing was able to go down and get one won't she?
that's enough

I hope the old thing finds her a cat to share love with before she dies

bookie
December 8th 06, 03:15 AM
2oz wrote:
> stonej wrote:
>
> > Not surprisingly she felt rather insulted by the whole situation. It
> > sounds like a possible case
> > of age discrimination to me.
>
> that's just awful
>
> the way I see it..
>
> free food is free food
>
> i mean.. the old woman was willing to feed and spend money
>
> i disagree with them
>
> hey, I tell ya.
>
> the old thing was able to go down and get one won't she?
> that's enough
>
> I hope the old thing finds her a cat to share love with before she dies

i can see both sides to this; the old dear wants to have companionship
in the twilight of her life and is willing to share her home with a
needy puss, feed it, protect it, love it etc etc which is great and
there should be more people out there willing to do this. Also when an
older person has something like a pet to look after their quality of
life tends to improves and they tend to be much more active and
positive about life than if they had nothing and noone to get up for
every morning, and this in itself can help extend and enhance the OAPs
life sometimes. Simple symbiotic relationship there; old dear looks
after and feeds kitty, kitty gives old dear something to live for, and
if it were that straight forward then I am sure the rescue centre would
be happy to hand over a small puss for her to look after as they are
always looking for good homes for their cats.

the flip side is just as a lot of people have said already; what if the
aforementioned old timer pops her clogs, kicks the bucket, shuffles off
this mortal coil, i.e. dies? then the rescue centre are going to have
to take the kitty back in again and start looking out for a new home
for her. this constant toing and froing from one place to the next can
be stressful for little pusscats, highly unsettling, and really should
be avoided at all costs for the sake of the cat. The rescue centre are
merely looking out for the cat's welfare, that is what they are there
to do, harsh as it may sound to this old dear but their first priority
is to the welfare of the cats not the old lady and that is why they are
reluctant to let her take one away permanently.

They have offered to let her foster which basically means that the cat
remains the property of the rescue centre (in law) so that if the old
dear became too old or infirm to look after herself let alone still
keep feeding kitty then they can come and legally remove the cat before
things get too much and the woman is taken into a home and the kitty is
abandoned. Remember, sometimes when old people go into a home or die
the pet are the last consideration and are sometimes left to fend for
themselves. i had one old cat who had spent the previous 6 months
before being handed to a rescue centre living alone in his dead owners
house by himself with his dead mum's son coming in once a day (if that)
to feed him until such time as he managed to sell the house. Only then
did anyone bother to sort out the cats situation, by whichtime he was a
very confused and nervous puss and did not liek to be left alone by
himself in my house for obvious reasons. Fostering a cat to an older
person might help to avoid this problem reocurring in future as the
rescue centre woudl keep regular check onthe cat's situation. ALSO as
happens with some organisations in the UK they may pay for vet
treatment and similar since the animal is stil legally theirs, which
woudl be a great financially burden lifted off the shoulders of someone
who is trying to cope on a pension and who may not be able to afford
emergency vet care (I don't know what pensions are like in the US but
in the UK they are crap and the cost of living is high)

actually come to think about it Jasper (previously mentioned cat) was
only fostered to me, the cat rescue society paid for the majority of
his vet treatment which was v helpful as he was v old and had all sorts
wrong with him. I was not insulted at all, and I am nowhere near 77
years old!

no doubt lots of people will argue with me over what i have just
written, but that is just the way i see it,
ciao for now, B

ChristyLynn
December 8th 06, 03:33 AM
"bookie" > wrote
> They have offered to let her foster which basically means that the cat
> remains the property of the rescue centre (in law) so that if the old
> dear became too old or infirm to look after herself let alone still
> keep feeding kitty then they can come and legally remove the cat before
> things get too much and the woman is taken into a home and the kitty is
> abandoned.


Or they can find someone who wants the cat after the woman has been
fostering it for some time, take the cat from her, break her heart and leave
her with no cat. Even more mean. Fostered animals are usually listed on
sites such as for shelters and rescues, they can be yanked from a foster
home at any time.

Cheryl
December 8th 06, 03:37 AM
On Thu 07 Dec 2006 10:15:28p, bookie wrote in
rec.pets.cats.health+behav
ups.com>:

> Fostering a cat to an older
> person might help to avoid this problem reocurring in future as
> the rescue centre woudl keep regular check onthe cat's
> situation. ALSO as happens with some organisations in the UK
> they may pay for vet treatment and similar since the animal is
> stil legally theirs, which woudl be a great financially burden
> lifted off the shoulders of someone who is trying to cope on a
> pension and who may not be able to afford emergency vet care (I
> don't know what pensions are like in the US but in the UK they
> are crap and the cost of living is high)
>

This is a good reason why this is an ideal situation for aged
citizens. Several years ago we had discussions about placing cats
in senior citizen homes, mostly because they are good for moral,
and there are many senior citizen homes, hence, many ready homes
for homeless, friendly cats. If the cats remain at least partly the
responsibility of the rescue group, food and love should be given
by the senior, and help with vet bills given by the rescue group
allowing them to foster. Everyone wins. Yes, rescue groups are not
rich, but rather than have the few fosterers they can find get
filled and unable to take more, why not let seniors foster with the
option, but still retain the responsibility of taking them back?
Fosterers don't pay medicals bills, and some foster cats can be in
the system for many many years. I've seen it.

Every senior citizen facility I've visited has had at least one
resident cat.

--
Cheryl

bookie
December 8th 06, 03:53 AM
ChristyLynn wrote:
> "bookie" > wrote
> > They have offered to let her foster which basically means that the cat
> > remains the property of the rescue centre (in law) so that if the old
> > dear became too old or infirm to look after herself let alone still
> > keep feeding kitty then they can come and legally remove the cat before
> > things get too much and the woman is taken into a home and the kitty is
> > abandoned.
>
>
> Or they can find someone who wants the cat after the woman has been
> fostering it for some time, take the cat from her, break her heart and leave
> her with no cat. Even more mean. Fostered animals are usually listed on
> sites such as for shelters and rescues, they can be yanked from a foster
> home at any time.
like i said the cat rescue centres are only really concerned with the
cats welfare not the woman's (as it should be), and they woud only
really take it from her if she were deemed to be incapable of looking
after it anymore anyway I am sure. the cat rescue centre or whatever
woud not uproot a settled cat if they could help it as it would be in
the best interest of the cat to do so for example if the woman was put
into a home and could not take the animal with her or she died which
tends to make looking after a cat's needs a touch difficult.

jasper was fostered with me purely so that the cats protection lot
could pay his vets bills etc, there was no idea or mention of his being
taken away and handed over to anyone else (unless of course I died or
something) and he was not 'advertised' by the society as being 'up for
adoption' by anyone else. To behonest i doubt anyone else woud have
wanted him; he was 17 years old, arthritic, had hyperthyroidism, bad
teeth from a poor diet during his last few years with his previous mum
who was not really up to looking after a cat, a tumour growing in his
bladder, and an amazing ability to shed tons of white hairs over any
fabric he came within 2 feet of, but he was wonderful, he was my brave
little soldier and I loved every bit of his furry little self.
i know it would be harsh on an old dear but these places do have to
think of the cats first, that is what they are there for.

another option is for the old dear to volunteer at a centre, help
socialise cats and cuddle them, centre are always crying out for
volunteers to run them. But then would you call it mean when someone
gives a really good home to one of the cats that the old lady
particularly likes? whose welfare are we really concerned with here?
I do see your point, but I also see why the rescue centre have done
what they did too

bookie
December 8th 06, 04:00 AM
the cat rescue centre or whatever
> woud not uproot a settled cat if they could help it as it would be in
> the best interest of the cat to do so

sorry that should read 'as it would NOT be in the best interests of the
cat to do so'

DOH!

Matthew
December 8th 06, 04:07 AM
I am going to add my 2 cents here . I have experience dealing with the
older generation when it comes to pet adoption. We had pet finder help us
out place our rescues into homes 95% of them where are least and 65 or
older. We looked for retirement homes plus seniors and made sure there were
the highest priority to get our rescues.
Every senior person that got a furball. There were strict requirements
before adoption. If anything happened to the senior where they could not
take care of the pet the furball came back to us. The senior had to prove
that they were able to take care of the rescue both physical and
financially. Also they had to sign a waiver that we could inspect their
property to make sure it was habital. I will say that quite a few seniors
lied and they need serious help when we saw their homes. They were
desperate to have something in their life. A few times we had to have
animal control come in and take what pets they had there. Sad situations
some time.
We kept very good watch on the rescues. We invited the seniors at any
time if they need vet treatment to come in at no charge. I personally drove
to many of house to make sure the pets were ok and to give a ride into the
shelter. I will say this EVERY senior that got a pet their life improved
at least 100%. The homes were so happy to have resident cats and dogs.
They were on list to get rescue pets.
We are lucky sort to say that Florida is full of newly weds and nearly
deads. There are so many retirement homes here that there is a market on
them.
Now I can understand a shelter have strict policies on their adoptions
specially with older generations. Plus all we have is the old lady's side
of the story. I would almost lay odds there is more to it.

ChristyLynn
December 8th 06, 04:08 AM
"bookie" > wrote
< they woud only
> really take it from her if she were deemed to be incapable of looking
> after it anymore anyway I am sure. the cat rescue centre or whatever
> woud not uproot a settled cat if they could help it as it would be in
> the best interest of the cat


I disagree with you. Fostering is a temporary situation, just like someone
fostering a child. If a person comes forward interested in a pet, they will
take it from the home into the permanent situation. I know for a fact with
dogs this happens, so why not cats.

Cheryl
December 8th 06, 04:18 AM
On Thu 07 Dec 2006 11:08:38p, ChristyLynn wrote in
rec.pets.cats.health+behav
>:

> I disagree with you. Fostering is a temporary situation, just
> like someone fostering a child. If a person comes forward
> interested in a pet, they will take it from the home into the
> permanent situation. I know for a fact with dogs this happens,
> so why not cats.

In the group I used to be involved with, there was a situation
called "foster to permanent" or something like that. It was simply,
foster the cats and if the fosterer was able to, remove the cat
from the "system". If the fosterer was unable to (lack of money for
care, unstable housing, etc) the cat was considered a foster cat,
and still in the system and could be moved to another fosterer. Of
course this is not ideal for the cats, but better than some
situations, and the cat is always cared for, so a move, while not
stress-free, will still happen in the event that the fosterer had
to relinquish kitty. I think most cats are able to adapt if they
feel love. Some may not, so maybe a behaviorist should be employed
to oversee moves if they have to happen. I dunno. Just throwing
out ideas.


--
Cheryl

bookie
December 8th 06, 04:40 AM
Matthew wrote:
> I am going to add my 2 cents here . I have experience dealing with the
> older generation when it comes to pet adoption. We had pet finder help us
> out place our rescues into homes 95% of them where are least and 65 or
> older. We looked for retirement homes plus seniors and made sure there were
> the highest priority to get our rescues.
> Every senior person that got a furball. There were strict requirements
> before adoption. If anything happened to the senior where they could not
> take care of the pet the furball came back to us. The senior had to prove
> that they were able to take care of the rescue both physical and
> financially. Also they had to sign a waiver that we could inspect their
> property to make sure it was habital. I will say that quite a few seniors
> lied and they need serious help when we saw their homes. They were
> desperate to have something in their life. A few times we had to have
> animal control come in and take what pets they had there. Sad situations
> some time.
> We kept very good watch on the rescues. We invited the seniors at any
> time if they need vet treatment to come in at no charge. I personally drove
> to many of house to make sure the pets were ok and to give a ride into the
> shelter. I will say this EVERY senior that got a pet their life improved
> at least 100%. The homes were so happy to have resident cats and dogs.
> They were on list to get rescue pets.
> We are lucky sort to say that Florida is full of newly weds and nearly
> deads. There are so many retirement homes here that there is a market on
> them.
> Now I can understand a shelter have strict policies on their adoptions
> specially with older generations. Plus all we have is the old lady's side
> of the story. I would almost lay odds there is more to it.

i totally agree that older people or senior citizens or whatever make
great cat adopters as they have so much love to give AND the older
person does benefit immensely from having a furry companion to fuss
over and share their days with, I think i have said that before
somewhere. What concerns me is what you have just pointed out about
some older people not realising or perhaps not wanting to admit that
perhaps they are not really in a position to adopt a cat permanantly
and look after properly, and that is why this fostering idea is often
proposed I think to older people. Letting old people's homes (where
there are lots of old people living together and looked after 24 hours
a day, like a nursinghome) have cats is a great idea as there are at
least younger and more able staff on hand to care for the cats when the
oldies get too old for that, but these oldies can still enjoy the
companionship of the animal and the cat is well looked after by the
staff. I think the situation discussed here is whether a rescue centre
should hand over an animal to an old lady living by herself (or so we
think, we don't have the full story of her circumstances) and the
reasons why they might be reluctant to do so.

please believe me when i say that noone is deliberately trying to break
some old ladies heart or anything like that, they are just looking out
for the cats!

I hate to say it but i am kind of siding with the rescue centre on
this, but ask me when i am 77 and I may think differently

Richard Evans
December 8th 06, 05:22 AM
"ChristyLynn" > wrote:

>"bookie" > wrote
>< they woud only
>> really take it from her if she were deemed to be incapable of looking
>> after it anymore anyway I am sure. the cat rescue centre or whatever
>> woud not uproot a settled cat if they could help it as it would be in
>> the best interest of the cat
>
>
>I disagree with you. Fostering is a temporary situation


That not uncommonly lasts months, or even years. A cat that has been
in foster care for over two years doesn't know that he's in foster
care and rightly feels uprooted when finally adopted.

December 8th 06, 05:46 AM
Cheryl wrote:
> On Thu 07 Dec 2006 10:15:28p, bookie wrote in
> rec.pets.cats.health+behav
> ups.com>:
>
> > Fostering a cat to an older
> > person might help to avoid this problem reocurring in future as
> > the rescue centre woudl keep regular check onthe cat's
> > situation. ALSO as happens with some organisations in the UK
> > they may pay for vet treatment and similar since the animal is
> > stil legally theirs, which woudl be a great financially burden
> > lifted off the shoulders of someone who is trying to cope on a
> > pension and who may not be able to afford emergency vet care (I
> > don't know what pensions are like in the US but in the UK they
> > are crap and the cost of living is high)
> >
>
> This is a good reason why this is an ideal situation for aged
> citizens. Several years ago we had discussions about placing cats
> in senior citizen homes, mostly because they are good for moral,
> and there are many senior citizen homes, hence, many ready homes
> for homeless, friendly cats. If the cats remain at least partly the
> responsibility of the rescue group, food and love should be given
> by the senior, and help with vet bills given by the rescue group
> allowing them to foster. Everyone wins. Yes, rescue groups are not
> rich, but rather than have the few fosterers they can find get
> filled and unable to take more, why not let seniors foster with the
> option, but still retain the responsibility of taking them back?
> Fosterers don't pay medicals bills, and some foster cats can be in
> the system for many many years. I've seen it.
>
> Every senior citizen facility I've visited has had at least one
> resident cat.
>
> --
> Cheryl

Good post, Cheryl. Yes, everyone *does* win. And, let's all be honest,
there are plenty of cats to go around, and shelter personnel are just
not going to yank a cat out of a foster home under those circumstances
simply to adopt it to someone else.
And just from my experience, all senior citizens aren't sweet little
old ladies. I recall one lady who *was* rather feeble and walked with a
cane. Her son brought her in to adopt a cat. She insisted on a cat that
was not a good match for her. The cat was young, very active, and a
chronic leg-rubber. We tried to match her with a calmer, older cat and
she would have none of it. We were sure the cat would cause her to fall
and were only thinking about her safety. She threw a wall-eyed fit and
left.
Another lady adopted and prompty declawed the cat and we found out
about it. When we asked her, she said her skin was paper-thin due to
her age, and she "had to."
I"m all for pets for the elderly, but those adoptions do require
special handling, IMO. Hyperactive cats, or kittens just aren't a good
match, also IMO.

Sherry

Phil P.
December 8th 06, 06:46 AM
"Gail" > wrote in message
ink.net...
> Perhaps if she shows them that someone will take care of the cat if she
> should die, they will let her. I am sure they are thinking that the cat
will
> probably outlive her and then what will happen to the animal.
> Gail

We always ask prospective adoptives if they have someone who will care for
the cat in the event of the adoptive's illness or death. That's our policy
with everyone at any age.

Most of our senior cats are adopted by middle-age and senior citizens. Its
better for the cat- she doesn't have rambunctious kids bothering her to play
all the time; and its better for the adoptives- they get a great cat for
companionship.

The only real concern I have is financial since older cats are prone to
long-term age-related illnesses. Are the adpotives on a fixed income? and
can they afford veterinary care? This is a concern for both: the cat and
the adoptive.

Phil

December 8th 06, 09:15 AM
stonej schrieb:

> A 77 year old woman was turned down for adoption of a cat at a local
> rescue group, reason
> given was that she was "too old" and it was their policy not to let
> elderly people adopt but she
> was told she could foster if she liked.
>
> Not surprisingly she felt rather insulted by the whole situation. It
> sounds like a possible case
> of age discrimination to me.

Though we do not have an 'age limit' at our rescue (well, actually we
do, but it's a minimum age!) I have had to decline senior citizens. I
remember them quite clearly because in both cases the people were
offended - but I still think the decision was in the best interest of
the animal. In the first case the person had been hospitalized long
term twice before and in each case had to turn her animals into a
rescue because noone could look after them while she was hospitalized.
In the second case the person was definitely frail (she was using a
walker and even with was not very stable) and wanted to adopt a kitten.
I suggested an older cat (both for her own and the cats safety) but she
refused.

BTW, our foster program will never remove a cat from a foster home if
the foster home wants to keep it. The advantage of fostering vs
adoption is that our rescue pays the medical bills. It is often the
only way to place older and special needs cats.

Just my POV.

December 8th 06, 09:15 AM
stonej schrieb:

> A 77 year old woman was turned down for adoption of a cat at a local
> rescue group, reason
> given was that she was "too old" and it was their policy not to let
> elderly people adopt but she
> was told she could foster if she liked.
>
> Not surprisingly she felt rather insulted by the whole situation. It
> sounds like a possible case
> of age discrimination to me.

Though we do not have an 'age limit' at our rescue (well, actually we
do, but it's a minimum age!) I have had to decline senior citizens. I
remember them quite clearly because in both cases the people were
offended - but I still think the decision was in the best interest of
the animal. In the first case the person had been hospitalized long
term twice before and in each case had to turn her animals into a
rescue because noone could look after them while she was hospitalized.
In the second case the person was definitely frail (she was using a
walker and even with was not very stable) and wanted to adopt a kitten.
I suggested an older cat (both for her own and the cats safety) but she
refused.

BTW, our foster program will never remove a cat from a foster home if
the foster home wants to keep it. The advantage of fostering vs
adoption is that our rescue pays the medical bills. It is often the
only way to place older and special needs cats.

Just my POV.

Petra

2fingah
December 8th 06, 11:48 AM
bookie wrote:

> the flip side is just as a lot of people have said already; what if the
> aforementioned old timer pops her clogs,

true, but...

life is lived by the drop not by the measure
nothing is guaranteed

they could all get hit by a truck on the way home AND DIE
cat hair everywhere, cat food all over the interstate
adoption papers blowing across the interstate

70 is not old... some people live to be 120

she could easily outlive the cat

i'd burn that shelter a new asshole
i'd make them bring me a pretty pussy in a satin lined box

bookie
December 8th 06, 03:37 PM
wrote:
> stonej schrieb:
>
> > A 77 year old woman was turned down for adoption of a cat at a local
> > rescue group, reason
> > given was that she was "too old" and it was their policy not to let
> > elderly people adopt but she
> > was told she could foster if she liked.
> >
> > Not surprisingly she felt rather insulted by the whole situation. It
> > sounds like a possible case
> > of age discrimination to me.
>
> Though we do not have an 'age limit' at our rescue (well, actually we
> do, but it's a minimum age!) I have had to decline senior citizens. I
> remember them quite clearly because in both cases the people were
> offended - but I still think the decision was in the best interest of
> the animal. In the first case the person had been hospitalized long
> term twice before and in each case had to turn her animals into a
> rescue because noone could look after them while she was hospitalized.
> In the second case the person was definitely frail (she was using a
> walker and even with was not very stable) and wanted to adopt a kitten.
> I suggested an older cat (both for her own and the cats safety) but she
> refused.
>
> BTW, our foster program will never remove a cat from a foster home if
> the foster home wants to keep it. The advantage of fostering vs
> adoption is that our rescue pays the medical bills. It is often the
> only way to place older and special needs cats.
>
> Just my POV.
>
> Petra
thank you I knew that rescue centre would not uproot a cat form a
foster home if it settled there and it was the best thing for the cat.
Can't believe that someone would get a cat then declaw it, can't
believe that declawing is still allowed to go on in some countries it
si certainly illegal here and quite rightly so. If you dont; want an
animal clawing your furniture get a tortoise! no i won't start on that,
that is a whole new topic so ignore all that please before anyone
starts ranting and raving.

I know kittens are cute and all that but I prefer my sedate older
kitties, even with all their medical problems and other foibles, last
one i adopted was 14 years, she is abot 16 now and stil going strong
despite hyperthyroidism and gives as much love and companionship as any
mad kitten. i think the tale of the old dear who was adamant about
getting a kitten is a fine example of how soem people (not just senior
citizens) are in denial of their true circumstances and are really not
in the best position to adopt a cat and then it is the centre's
unenviable job of having to turn them away (which then starts heated
debates like this)
and yes I know i could die in a car crash or whatever tomorrow but i
have made provision already for my someone else who is a firm cat lover
to take care of my cat if that should happen (ok it is a bit morbid but
you do have to be sensible)

B

Eva Quesnell
December 8th 06, 04:03 PM
On Thu, 7 Dec 2006, MaryL wrote:

>
> "Eva Quesnell" > wrote in message
> du...
>> On Thu, 7 Dec 2006, Gail wrote:
>>
>>> Perhaps if she shows them that someone will take care of the cat if she
>>> should die, they will let her. I am sure they are thinking that the cat
>>> will
>>> probably outlive her and then what will happen to the animal.
>>> Gail
>>
>> I have my cats covered in my will. It's a thing we all need to think
>> about. Life is short, and you never know.
>>
>> Eva
>>
>>>
>
> So do I. A friend has agreed to take care of my cats if anything were to
> happen to me (a friend who is as opposed as I am to declawing and who can be
> depended on always to give them great care). I have left some money in my
> will to her for the care of my furbabies.
>
> I think a person of *any* age needs to make arrangements -- we never know
> when something could happen to us.
>
> MaryL

This is true. The sky could fall at any moment. I decided it was time to
have a will when I flew to NYC in December, 2001.

Eva

bookie
December 8th 06, 04:05 PM
barb wrote:
> Due to my age I have decided that my Pickle is my last kitten. I do not
> want to have her outlive me. Older cats are hard to place although my vet
> said he would place or adopt my cats if it came to that. My next cat will
> be a very special older cat in need of a home.
>
> --
Good for you!!!! golden oldies need homes too and they are harder to
place than young furry scallywags. When you do adopt again I hope you
and your furry senior citizen are very happy together, I know you will
be and so does my 16-year old jessie (who is currently snuggled up in a
pile of old jumpers in the bottom of my wardrobe snoring gently, bless
her furry little heart)

B

Gail
December 8th 06, 04:08 PM
That is a wonderful idea. There are sooo many older cats looking for good
homes.
Gail
"barb" > wrote in message
...
> Due to my age I have decided that my Pickle is my last kitten. I do not
> want to have her outlive me. Older cats are hard to place although my vet
> said he would place or adopt my cats if it came to that. My next cat will
> be a very special older cat in need of a home.
>
> --
> Barb
> Of course I don't look busy,
> I did it right the first time.
> "stonej" > wrote in message
> ps.com...
>> A 77 year old woman was turned down for adoption of a cat at a local
>> rescue group, reason
>> given was that she was "too old" and it was their policy not to let
>> elderly people adopt but she
>> was told she could foster if she liked.
>>
>> Not surprisingly she felt rather insulted by the whole situation. It
>> sounds like a possible case
>> of age discrimination to me.
>>
>
>

barb
December 8th 06, 04:54 PM
Due to my age I have decided that my Pickle is my last kitten. I do not
want to have her outlive me. Older cats are hard to place although my vet
said he would place or adopt my cats if it came to that. My next cat will
be a very special older cat in need of a home.

--
Barb
Of course I don't look busy,
I did it right the first time.
"stonej" > wrote in message
ps.com...
> A 77 year old woman was turned down for adoption of a cat at a local
> rescue group, reason
> given was that she was "too old" and it was their policy not to let
> elderly people adopt but she
> was told she could foster if she liked.
>
> Not surprisingly she felt rather insulted by the whole situation. It
> sounds like a possible case
> of age discrimination to me.
>

ChristyLynn
December 8th 06, 09:37 PM
"2fingah" > wrote
> 70 is not old... some people live to be 120

They do? who?

dgk
December 9th 06, 02:12 AM
On 7 Dec 2006 15:14:16 -0800, "stonej" >
wrote:

>A 77 year old woman was turned down for adoption of a cat at a local
>rescue group, reason
>given was that she was "too old" and it was their policy not to let
>elderly people adopt but she
>was told she could foster if she liked.
>
>Not surprisingly she felt rather insulted by the whole situation. It
>sounds like a possible case
>of age discrimination to me.

Well I'm happy for this thread since it really made me think about
doing something about them. I certainly intend to leave money for them
but I'll actually do it now.

One of my elderly friends wouldn't get a new cat until after she had
undergone a few medical procedures. I didn't know till afterwards that
she really had been very sick. Once she was out of the woods then she
adopted Timmy. But she was clearly concerned that she might die and
leave Timmy homeless. Of course, that wouldn't have happened anyway.
She has two friends who would have taken Timmy. I'm one.

Cheryl
December 10th 06, 10:36 PM
On Fri 08 Dec 2006 12:46:35a, wrote in rec.pets.cats.health+behav
ps.com>:

> Another lady adopted and prompty declawed the cat and we found
> out about it. When we asked her, she said her skin was
> paper-thin due to her age, and she "had to."
> I"m all for pets for the elderly, but those adoptions do require
> special handling, IMO. Hyperactive cats, or kittens just aren't
> a good match, also IMO.

That's terrible. You can screen all you want, but sometimes people
take you by surprise. Even if interview questions try to draw out
those answers, they don't always work. :( The only ones you have a
chance with are when you ask them point-blank what would they do if
the cat started scratching them, their furniture, and everything
else, and if they don't realize how horrible declawing a cat is,
they might ellude to it. Then you can either hope to educate, or
deny adoption.

Definitely agree with you about kitten adoption to elderly people.
And those with small children.

--
Cheryl

Deborah Trujillo
December 12th 06, 02:45 PM
I feel the same way. After the heartbreak of Tumbleweed I will not be
adopting any more animals while my husband is alive - however, by the time
he dies I will probably be up there in years myself and should I adopt it
will be an older cat so there will be less chance it will outlive me.


On 12/8/06 8:08 AM, in article
et, "Gail"
> wrote:

> That is a wonderful idea. There are sooo many older cats looking for good
> homes.
> Gail
> "barb" > wrote in message
> ...
>> Due to my age I have decided that my Pickle is my last kitten. I do not
>> want to have her outlive me. Older cats are hard to place although my vet
>> said he would place or adopt my cats if it came to that. My next cat will
>> be a very special older cat in need of a home.
>>
>> --
>> Barb
>> Of course I don't look busy,
>> I did it right the first time.
>> "stonej" > wrote in message
>> ps.com...
>>> A 77 year old woman was turned down for adoption of a cat at a local
>>> rescue group, reason
>>> given was that she was "too old" and it was their policy not to let
>>> elderly people adopt but she
>>> was told she could foster if she liked.
>>>
>>> Not surprisingly she felt rather insulted by the whole situation. It
>>> sounds like a possible case
>>> of age discrimination to me.
>>>
>>
>>
>
>

MaryL
December 12th 06, 04:29 PM
"Deborah Trujillo" > wrote in message
.. .
>I feel the same way. After the heartbreak of Tumbleweed I will not be
> adopting any more animals while my husband is alive - however, by the time
> he dies I will probably be up there in years myself and should I adopt it
> will be an older cat so there will be less chance it will outlive me.
>
>
>

Whatever our ages and whatever the ages of our cats (and other pets), all of
us need to make arrangements in the event they could outlive us -- in much
the same way as parents make preparations for their children.

MaryL

Debbie
December 12th 06, 05:27 PM
I do. I made arrangements for Rocky and Natasha in my will because I
did not want them ending up in labs should I die. They are both gone
now (lost both to cancer). I would have made the same arrangements for
Tumbleweed had he stayed.


MaryL wrote:
> "Deborah Trujillo" > wrote in message
> .. .
> >I feel the same way. After the heartbreak of Tumbleweed I will not be
> > adopting any more animals while my husband is alive - however, by the time
> > he dies I will probably be up there in years myself and should I adopt it
> > will be an older cat so there will be less chance it will outlive me.
> >
> >
> >
>
> Whatever our ages and whatever the ages of our cats (and other pets), all of
> us need to make arrangements in the event they could outlive us -- in much
> the same way as parents make preparations for their children.
>
> MaryL

pokerchimp
December 12th 06, 06:02 PM
I adopted a 6 year old cat that was already declawed by her previous owner
(elderly, now dead). My poor baby. I think it ruined her life. It's bad
enough she has really short legs, but no front claws just took away her
spirit. She doesn't even try to climb higher than a chair, and she just
seems sad all the time. The woman really did not play with her as a kitten,
and she is seriously overweight. She won't play with any toys (although she
does get a little zany on catnip). She doesn't even bury her feces in the
litter box, just leaves it on top.

Declawing is absolutely abhorant. I added a kitten to the mix, and was very
worried Smudge would not be able to defend her self. After several weeks of
bathroom training the 3 month old feral kitten, and another week or so of
Smudge's serious hissing, it seems to work out ok. Smudge is getting a bit
more excercise with Sidney chasing her around. Fortunately she has so much
fur, and is so much bigger than him, that she is holding her own against his
claws. She just wrestles him to the groud, flips him over and pins him like
an olympic wrestler.
"Cheryl" > wrote in message
...
> On Fri 08 Dec 2006 12:46:35a, wrote in rec.pets.cats.health+behav
> ps.com>:
>
>> Another lady adopted and prompty declawed the cat and we found
>> out about it. When we asked her, she said her skin was
>> paper-thin due to her age, and she "had to."
>> I"m all for pets for the elderly, but those adoptions do require
>> special handling, IMO. Hyperactive cats, or kittens just aren't
>> a good match, also IMO.
>
> That's terrible. You can screen all you want, but sometimes people
> take you by surprise. Even if interview questions try to draw out
> those answers, they don't always work. :( The only ones you have a
> chance with are when you ask them point-blank what would they do if
> the cat started scratching them, their furniture, and everything
> else, and if they don't realize how horrible declawing a cat is,
> they might ellude to it. Then you can either hope to educate, or
> deny adoption.
>
> Definitely agree with you about kitten adoption to elderly people.
> And those with small children.
>
> --
> Cheryl

MaryL
December 12th 06, 07:19 PM
"Debbie" > wrote in message
oups.com...
>I do. I made arrangements for Rocky and Natasha in my will because I
> did not want them ending up in labs should I die. They are both gone
> now (lost both to cancer). I would have made the same arrangements for
> Tumbleweed had he stayed.
>
>

I also have a provision in my will. I did not name my furbabies because
that could change over the years, but I left a bequest specifically for
their care, naming the person to receive the bequest and be responsible for
them, and stipulating indoor only and no declaw (but it is very important
that these arrangements be made ahead of time with the person who agrees to
their care because it is questionnable whether arrangements in a will can
hold any guarantees except for the name of the recipient).

MaryL

2fingah
December 13th 06, 12:43 AM
MaryL wrote:

> Whatever our ages and whatever the ages of our cats (and other pets), all of
> us need to make arrangements in the event they could outlive us -- in much
> the same way as parents make preparations for their children.
>
> MaryL

why would anyone put insurance on their pets
me? for what? all I need is one hole dug (outback)
to make a proffit? oh that's gone too far

that is not love that's greed
and the pet would know it

plus, nobody is ever going to be good enough for your cat
if they are like children

what are you going to do, you have a will?

i think churchill left his house to his cats
you know they appreciate that

barb
December 13th 06, 04:36 PM
In New York State you can not leave money to pets in your will but you can
set up trust funds for them. When I had cancer in 1997 I came to grips with
all that and was more concerned about my cats surviving me than anything. I
did make arrangements for them but now I have outlived them after-all.

Cats can live up to 23 years although most don't live quite that long. Just
as you would be ill advised to adopt a baby at 70 years old the same goes
for adopting a kitten at that age. It's not age discrimination, it's the
heart-ache of having to go into the home where pets aren't allowed, or of
having to get dead and leaving your furbaby behind. That's bad business.
Just adopting a kitten because you want to enjoy a kitten and you don't care
if you can't care for them their whole life is selfishness, plain and
simple.

Barb
Of course I don't look busy,
I did it right the first time.

AZ Nomad
December 13th 06, 05:58 PM
On Wed, 13 Dec 2006 10:36:29 -0600, barb > wrote:


>In New York State you can not leave money to pets in your will but you can
>set up trust funds for them. When I had cancer in 1997 I came to grips with
>all that and was more concerned about my cats surviving me than anything. I
>did make arrangements for them but now I have outlived them after-all.

>Cats can live up to 23 years although most don't live quite that long. Just
>as you would be ill advised to adopt a baby at 70 years old the same goes
>for adopting a kitten at that age. It's not age discrimination, it's the
>heart-ache of having to go into the home where pets aren't allowed, or of
>having to get dead and leaving your furbaby behind. That's bad business.
>Just adopting a kitten because you want to enjoy a kitten and you don't care
>if you can't care for them their whole life is selfishness, plain and
>simple.

That only makes sense if the senior citizen hasn't a will and is
without family or friends.

bookie
December 13th 06, 07:13 PM
AZ Nomad wrote:
> On Wed, 13 Dec 2006 10:36:29 -0600, barb > wrote:
>
>
> >In New York State you can not leave money to pets in your will but you can
> >set up trust funds for them. When I had cancer in 1997 I came to grips with
> >all that and was more concerned about my cats surviving me than anything. I
> >did make arrangements for them but now I have outlived them after-all.
>
> >Cats can live up to 23 years although most don't live quite that long. Just
> >as you would be ill advised to adopt a baby at 70 years old the same goes
> >for adopting a kitten at that age. It's not age discrimination, it's the
> >heart-ache of having to go into the home where pets aren't allowed, or of
> >having to get dead and leaving your furbaby behind. That's bad business.
> >Just adopting a kitten because you want to enjoy a kitten and you don't care
> >if you can't care for them their whole life is selfishness, plain and
> >simple.
>
> That only makes sense if the senior citizen hasn't a will and is
> without family or friends.

no it doesn't, even if the old person has made a will and organised for
a friend or family member to take over the cats care it will still be
unsettling for the cat and cause unnecessary stress which may be
avoided if the cat was homed to a younger person or persons. yes,
making a will is better than leaving the cat high and dry but not
handing a cat over to some feeble old biddy who is highly likely to
'pop her clogs' in the next few months is much better.

have just actually visited the national cat centre this arvo on my way
back from the dentists, I wish I could take them all home, it is so sad
for some of them, all they want is a warm bed, some cuddles, a bowl of
food and a fire to stretch out in front of. I am not old at all but i
have to be honest with myself and have a think about whether ti would
be a good idea to take on another cat, whether i can afford it and look
after it properly and most importantly whether it would upset jessie my
princess puss if i were to make her share her house with another cat.

barb
December 14th 06, 09:03 PM
Bookie,

You are so right. Look around at your family and friends. Who among them
could really take your cat and care for them as you would want? What
survives in my family never had pets and cares nothing about them. My
friends are either around my age or young and completely unsettled in life
right now. That holds true for my son, too. At 34 he can just about take
care of himself in an apartment that doesn't allow pets. Pets have shorter
life spans than we do so that we can take care of them their whole lives.

--
Barb
Of course I don't look busy,
I did it right the first time.

barb
December 14th 06, 09:05 PM
Just read Richard Evan's post- "Relocating an elderly cat" because the owner
had to go into a nursing home.

--
Barb
Of course I don't look busy,
I did it right the first time.