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CatNipped
December 12th 06, 09:38 PM
"Nomen Nescio" > wrote in message
...
> Actually, Barry, It's the first sentence of a rant by Lenny Bruce about
> the stupidity, and the dangers, of people who are offended by words.
>
> The rant was toned down, shortened, and "hollywoodized" in the movie
> "Lenny"
>
<snip Lenny Bruce screenplay quote>

Nice sentiment, but it just doesn't work that way. It isn't the word
itself - those two syllables can be repeated until they are nonsense sounds.
It's the intent behind some people's vocalization of the word. The hatred,
prejudice, and/or fear could be spoken as any two syllables and still have
the power to hurt. My objection to hearing *anyone* say that word is that
it gives credence to others who want to be "hip, kewl, with it, whatever" to
keep in usage a word that symbolizes everything that is nasty and dispicable
in the underbelly of our human psyche.

Hugs,

CatNipped

Eva Quesnell
December 12th 06, 11:22 PM
On Tue, 12 Dec 2006, CatNipped wrote:

> "Nomen Nescio" > wrote in message
> ...
>> Actually, Barry, It's the first sentence of a rant by Lenny Bruce about
>> the stupidity, and the dangers, of people who are offended by words.
>>
>> The rant was toned down, shortened, and "hollywoodized" in the movie
>> "Lenny"
>>
> <snip Lenny Bruce screenplay quote>
>
> Nice sentiment, but it just doesn't work that way. It isn't the word
> itself - those two syllables can be repeated until they are nonsense sounds.
> It's the intent behind some people's vocalization of the word. The hatred,
> prejudice, and/or fear could be spoken as any two syllables and still have
> the power to hurt. My objection to hearing *anyone* say that word is that
> it gives credence to others who want to be "hip, kewl, with it, whatever" to
> keep in usage a word that symbolizes everything that is nasty and dispicable
> in the underbelly of our human psyche.
>
> Hugs,
>
> CatNipped

Yes, I agree. The word has a history of hatred behind it. Can't remember
where the quote comes from -- but "Words are like weapons." I think we
should all be offended by words that symbolize hatred and ignorance.

Eva

Lynne
December 13th 06, 12:23 AM
on Tue, 12 Dec 2006 22:22:42 GMT, Eva Quesnell > wrote:

> Yes, I agree. The word has a history of hatred behind it. Can't
> remember where the quote comes from -- but "Words are like weapons."
> I think we should all be offended by words that symbolize hatred and
> ignorance.

I respectfully disagree. Words only have the power we allow them to have.

--
Lynne

http://picasaweb.google.com/what.the.hell.is.it/

Eva Quesnell
December 13th 06, 01:01 AM
On Tue, 12 Dec 2006, Lynne wrote:

> on Tue, 12 Dec 2006 22:22:42 GMT, Eva Quesnell > wrote:
>
>> Yes, I agree. The word has a history of hatred behind it. Can't
>> remember where the quote comes from -- but "Words are like weapons."
>> I think we should all be offended by words that symbolize hatred and
>> ignorance.
>
> I respectfully disagree. Words only have the power we allow them to have.
>
> --
> Lynne
>
> http://picasaweb.google.com/what.the.hell.is.it/

And I must also respectfully disagree. "The pen is mightier than the
sword." Words are powerful.

Eva

December 13th 06, 05:00 AM
In article >,
Lynne > wrote:

> Words only have the power we allow them to have.

Heh. Sticks and stones, huh?

That's entirely suitable for bumper stickers and basic moral lessons for
kids. But it is much less effective in real communication.

Words do not exist in a vacuum. Context is important, maybe crucial.
Words are among the major tools available to people to set the tone of
the context.

CatNipped
December 13th 06, 05:48 PM
"Eva Quesnell" > wrote in message
u...
> On Tue, 12 Dec 2006, CatNipped wrote:
>
>> "Nomen Nescio" > wrote in message
>> ...
>>> Actually, Barry, It's the first sentence of a rant by Lenny Bruce about
>>> the stupidity, and the dangers, of people who are offended by words.
>>>
>>> The rant was toned down, shortened, and "hollywoodized" in the movie
>>> "Lenny"
>>>
>> <snip Lenny Bruce screenplay quote>
>>
>> Nice sentiment, but it just doesn't work that way. It isn't the word
>> itself - those two syllables can be repeated until they are nonsense
>> sounds.
>> It's the intent behind some people's vocalization of the word. The
>> hatred,
>> prejudice, and/or fear could be spoken as any two syllables and still
>> have
>> the power to hurt. My objection to hearing *anyone* say that word is
>> that
>> it gives credence to others who want to be "hip, kewl, with it, whatever"
>> to
>> keep in usage a word that symbolizes everything that is nasty and
>> dispicable
>> in the underbelly of our human psyche.
>>
>> Hugs,
>>
>> CatNipped
>
> Yes, I agree. The word has a history of hatred behind it. Can't remember
> where the quote comes from -- but "Words are like weapons." I think we
> should all be offended by words that symbolize hatred and ignorance.

Cher! ;> "Words are like weapons, they wound sometimes" - from "If I Could
Turn Back Time".

> Eva

CatNipped
December 13th 06, 08:33 PM
> wrote in message
...
> In article >,
> Lynne > wrote:
>
>> Words only have the power we allow them to have.
>
> Heh. Sticks and stones, huh?
>
> That's entirely suitable for bumper stickers and basic moral lessons for
> kids. But it is much less effective in real communication.
>
> Words do not exist in a vacuum. Context is important, maybe crucial.
> Words are among the major tools available to people to set the tone of
> the context.

Exactly - you could call somebody a "Bolegrat" and if you have enough hate,
anger, and fear in your tone of voice and body language it will be just as
repulsive as using the "N" word.

The problem is that, after a long enough usage to hurt, the word itself will
retain some of the hate, anger, and fear that has always been associated
with it so that even if you said it with a smile on your face and a light
tone of voice, it can hurt.

The whole point is, why propagate something that represents the ugliest part
of our past (and, unfortunately our present as well)? Why not let it die
and try and to forget the hatred if not the lessons learned from such a
terrible part of our history.

Hugs,

CatNipped

The Ranger
December 13th 06, 09:45 PM
CatNipped > wrote in message
...
> Why not let it die and try and to forget the hatred
> if not the lessons learned from such a terrible part
> of our history.

Because as George Santayana once coined, "Those who do not learn
from history are doomed to repeat it."

The Ranger

cybercat
December 13th 06, 10:24 PM
"Eva Quesnell" > wrote
> friends of mine. I believe I know the origin of the word. It is taken
> from the word "niggard," a stingy person, miser (in my dictionary). So it
> doesn't actually mean "black person," but the misuse of the word lead to
> it being a hateful word meant to put black people in "their place." So I
> see no merit to the word, and it just will never come out of my mouth.
>

It was taken from the Spanish "Negro" meaning black.

CatNipped
December 13th 06, 10:55 PM
"The Ranger" > wrote in message
...
> CatNipped > wrote in message
> ...
>> Why not let it die and try and to forget the hatred
>> if not the lessons learned from such a terrible part
>> of our history.
>
> Because as George Santayana once coined, "Those who do not learn
> from history are doomed to repeat it."
>
> The Ranger

I thought that was what I was saying when I wrote "...if not the lessons
learned..." I still think it would be nice to be able to forget there ever
was such a thing as hatred - knowing that it existed as an out-dated evil
but having no idea what it feels like.

Hugs

CatNipped

2fingah
December 14th 06, 04:07 AM
CatNipped wrote:

> Exactly - you could call somebody a "Bolegrat" and if you have enough hate,
> anger, and fear in your tone of voice and body language it will be just as
> repulsive as using the "N" word.

the spankings will start in a moment

just chillin, been a crazy 2 days Lori
<darting my eyes>

I got busted staring at this woman today
im glad I got caught, i wanted her to know
i can't find these dang buttholes, kittens.. matt said the rectal temp
was around 97.6
just playing
I should get me a glass thermometer, the shakedown glass one

I AIN'T SAY'N SHE'S A GOLD DIGGER BUT SHE AIN'T MESSIN WID NO BROKE
NIGGA

2fingah
December 14th 06, 04:18 AM
Eva Quesnell wrote:

> And I must also respectfully disagree. "The pen is mightier than the
> sword." Words are powerful.
>
> Eva

so lend us some words, we'll lend our ears
do you have any warts? and where

Matthew
December 14th 06, 04:46 AM
Hey don't get me involved with anything that has to do with the butt ;-)


"2fingah" > wrote in message
ups.com...
>
> CatNipped wrote:
>
>> Exactly - you could call somebody a "Bolegrat" and if you have enough
>> hate,
>> anger, and fear in your tone of voice and body language it will be just
>> as
>> repulsive as using the "N" word.
>
> the spankings will start in a moment
>
> just chillin, been a crazy 2 days Lori
> <darting my eyes>
>
> I got busted staring at this woman today
> im glad I got caught, i wanted her to know
> i can't find these dang buttholes, kittens.. matt said the rectal temp
> was around 97.6
> just playing
> I should get me a glass thermometer, the shakedown glass one
>
> I AIN'T SAY'N SHE'S A GOLD DIGGER BUT SHE AIN'T MESSIN WID NO BROKE
> NIGGA
>

2fingah
December 14th 06, 04:50 AM
Matthew wrote:
> Hey don't get me involved with anything that has to do with the butt ;-)

oh hell no

Lynne
December 14th 06, 05:06 PM
on Thu, 14 Dec 2006 15:50:05 GMT, Nomen Nescio > wrote:

> From: Eva Quesnell >
>
>> "The pen is mightier than the
>>sword."
>
> Maybe. But if someone attacks me with a pen, I'd rather be holding a
> sword.

Hehe.

--
Lynne

cybercat
December 14th 06, 06:57 PM
"Lynne" > wrote in message
. 97.142...
> on Thu, 14 Dec 2006 15:50:05 GMT, Nomen Nescio > wrote:
>
>> From: Eva Quesnell >
>>
>>> "The pen is mightier than the
>>>sword."
>>
>> Maybe. But if someone attacks me with a pen, I'd rather be holding a
>> sword.
>
> Hehe.
>
> --
> Lynne

You might want to do a Google search on this group, keywords "female CEO."
The pertinent discussion was about a year ago, I think.

When our good bud Nomen does not have a sword in his hand, he usually has
his little tiny dick in his hand. While making lots of big noise, like
others of his
kind here. lol

Eva Quesnell
December 14th 06, 08:05 PM
On Thu, 14 Dec 2006, Nomen Nescio wrote:

> From: Eva Quesnell >
>
>> "The pen is mightier than the
>> sword."
>
> Maybe. But if someone attacks me with a pen, I'd rather be holding a sword.

I think perhaps you missed the point.

Eva

Luna's Mom
December 16th 06, 09:44 PM
cybercat wrote:
> "Eva Quesnell" > wrote
>
>>friends of mine. I believe I know the origin of the word. It is taken
>>from the word "niggard," a stingy person, miser (in my dictionary). So it
>>doesn't actually mean "black person," but the misuse of the word lead to
>>it being a hateful word meant to put black people in "their place." So I
>>see no merit to the word, and it just will never come out of my mouth.
>>
>
>
> It was taken from the Spanish "Negro" meaning black.
>
>

Interestingly, at my old school, where about 50% of the population is
black, kids would wig out when I taught them the word "negro" as the
color black. (I teach Spanish) They would get bent out of shape and
insist that it was derrogatory!

I had to explain to them that the word "negro" came wayyyy before the
other.

Pam