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Richard Evans
December 13th 06, 07:02 PM
My mother had a stroke and has to go to a nursing home. She probably
will not go home again. Her cat Molly is 22 years old and in excellent
health. She has had a place of her own all her life with no other
animals and constant human companionship.

The options for taking care of her are:

She can stay in the same town and live with my niece, who has other
cats and a dog. She has a big house and there is room to isolate Molly
from the other critters, but it won't be much of a life lived in
isolation.

I can bring her to my house, which is a ten hour drive, but I have
seven cats and two dogs and no way to isolate her from them.

Which option is likely to be least stressful for her?

Modell Rocks
December 13th 06, 07:10 PM
Richard Evans wrote:
> My mother had a stroke and has to go to a nursing home. She probably
> will not go home again. Her cat Molly is 22 years old and in excellent
> health. She has had a place of her own all her life with no other
> animals and constant human companionship.
>
> The options for taking care of her are:
>
> She can stay in the same town and live with my niece, who has other
> cats and a dog. She has a big house and there is room to isolate Molly
> from the other critters, but it won't be much of a life lived in
> isolation.
>
> I can bring her to my house, which is a ten hour drive, but I have
> seven cats and two dogs and no way to isolate her from them.
>
> Which option is likely to be least stressful for her?

A shovel.

Lynne
December 13th 06, 07:14 PM
on Wed, 13 Dec 2006 18:02:09 GMT, Richard Evans >
wrote:

> My mother had a stroke and has to go to a nursing home. She probably
> will not go home again. Her cat Molly is 22 years old and in excellent
> health. She has had a place of her own all her life with no other
> animals and constant human companionship.
>
> The options for taking care of her are:
>
> She can stay in the same town and live with my niece, who has other
> cats and a dog. She has a big house and there is room to isolate Molly
> from the other critters, but it won't be much of a life lived in
> isolation.
>
> I can bring her to my house, which is a ten hour drive, but I have
> seven cats and two dogs and no way to isolate her from them.
>
> Which option is likely to be least stressful for her?

It sounds like your niece's house would be the least stressful, but that
seems obvious. Does your neice not want to take care of Molly? Will your
niece and her family give Molly some companionship and affection, as well
as proper care as she nears the end of her life?

--
Lynne

cybercat
December 13th 06, 07:14 PM
"Richard Evans" > wrote :
>
> She can stay in the same town and live with my niece, who has other
> cats and a dog. She has a big house and there is room to isolate Molly
> from the other critters, but it won't be much of a life lived in
> isolation.
>

This sounds like the best thing for her. She needs peace and quiet. She
is very old, and may not outlive her grief for losing your mother.

Lynne
December 13th 06, 07:14 PM
on Wed, 13 Dec 2006 18:10:52 GMT, "Modell Rocks" >
wrote:

> A shovel.

<plonk jackass>

--
Lynne

Richard Evans
December 13th 06, 07:54 PM
Lynne > wrote:

>
>It sounds like your niece's house would be the least stressful, but that
>seems obvious. Does your neice not want to take care of Molly?

Yes, she does.

> Will your
>niece and her family give Molly some companionship and affection, as well
>as proper care as she nears the end of her life?

It's just my niece, and she works all day. If Molly has to be isolated
from the other critters, then it will take a special effort just to
spend time with her.

Lynne
December 13th 06, 08:02 PM
on Wed, 13 Dec 2006 18:54:39 GMT, Richard Evans >
wrote:

> It's just my niece, and she works all day. If Molly has to be isolated
> from the other critters, then it will take a special effort just to
> spend time with her.

it still sounds like the better situation for Molly. Perhaps after Molly
has settled in and all the animals are used to her smell behind the door,
and she is used to theirs, she can meet the resident dog and cats and
participate with the family to some degree so she isn't lonely.

--
Lynne

December 13th 06, 09:33 PM
Richard Evans > wrote:

>My mother had a stroke and has to go to a nursing home. She probably
>will not go home again. Her cat Molly is 22 years old and in excellent
>health. She has had a place of her own all her life with no other
>animals and constant human companionship.
>
>The options for taking care of her are:
>
>She can stay in the same town and live with my niece, who has other
>cats and a dog. She has a big house and there is room to isolate Molly
>from the other critters, but it won't be much of a life lived in
>isolation.
>
>I can bring her to my house, which is a ten hour drive, but I have
>seven cats and two dogs and no way to isolate her from them.
>
>Which option is likely to be least stressful for her?
>


Reread your own post. Isn't the answer obvious?

-mhd

MaryL
December 13th 06, 11:45 PM
"Richard Evans" > wrote in message
...
> My mother had a stroke and has to go to a nursing home. She probably
> will not go home again. Her cat Molly is 22 years old and in excellent
> health. She has had a place of her own all her life with no other
> animals and constant human companionship.
>
> The options for taking care of her are:
>
> She can stay in the same town and live with my niece, who has other
> cats and a dog. She has a big house and there is room to isolate Molly
> from the other critters, but it won't be much of a life lived in
> isolation.
>
> I can bring her to my house, which is a ten hour drive, but I have
> seven cats and two dogs and no way to isolate her from them.
>
> Which option is likely to be least stressful for her?
>
>

I would select your niece's residence out of the two options you outlined.
If at all possible, though, please see if you can locate a home more like
the one Molly has always had -- possibly a single or retired couple with no
other pets or with very docile pets that would be likely to accept a
newcomer. Check with Molly's veterinarian to see if he or she would know of
any likely candidates. There might even be someone who has recently lost a
loved cat who would be willing to adopt your mother's cat. Molly is going
to be exceedingly lonely under both of the two options you have at the
moment.

Thank you for trying to find a solution that is in Molly's best interests.
Too many people would simply abandon her, especially given her advanced age.
She gave your mother many years of love (and received love and attention
from your mother), and I hope you can find a solution that will continue
that type of arrangement.

MaryL

Spot
December 14th 06, 12:56 AM
Does your mother have any friends or a neighbor who might consider taking
her? It sounds like a home with another elderly couple or person might be a
better choice for all. Check at your local Senior Centers to see if you
can't find someone to adopt her. I'd hate to see her locked away in
isolation for the rest of her life.

Celeste

"Richard Evans" > wrote in message
...
> My mother had a stroke and has to go to a nursing home. She probably
> will not go home again. Her cat Molly is 22 years old and in excellent
> health. She has had a place of her own all her life with no other
> animals and constant human companionship.
>
> The options for taking care of her are:
>
> She can stay in the same town and live with my niece, who has other
> cats and a dog. She has a big house and there is room to isolate Molly
> from the other critters, but it won't be much of a life lived in
> isolation.
>
> I can bring her to my house, which is a ten hour drive, but I have
> seven cats and two dogs and no way to isolate her from them.
>
> Which option is likely to be least stressful for her?
>
>

Lynne
December 14th 06, 01:06 AM
on Wed, 13 Dec 2006 22:45:05 GMT, "MaryL" -OUT-THE-
LITTER> wrote:

> Check with Molly's veterinarian to see if he or she would know of
> any likely candidates.

You can also check with the local rescues. Look on petfinder.com to get a
list of rescues in your area. Some will be cat specific, others may work
with both cats and dogs.

--
Lynne

http://picasaweb.google.com/what.the.hell.is.it/

Richard Evans
January 6th 07, 06:23 PM
Richard Evans > wrote:

>My mother had a stroke and has to go to a nursing home. She probably
>will not go home again. Her cat Molly is 22 years old and in excellent
>health. She has had a place of her own all her life with no other
>animals and constant human companionship.
>
>The options for taking care of her are:
>
>She can stay in the same town and live with my niece, who has other
>cats and a dog. She has a big house and there is room to isolate Molly
>from the other critters, but it won't be much of a life lived in
>isolation.
>
>I can bring her to my house, which is a ten hour drive, but I have
>seven cats and two dogs and no way to isolate her from them.
>
>Which option is likely to be least stressful for her?


My mother died on December 29th. Molly had spent several weeks alone
before her death and was very stressed by her absence. We moved her to
my niece's house, but a vet checkup revealed numerous system failures,
probably brought on by the disruption in her routine. We will probably
have to put her down.

Lynne
January 6th 07, 07:36 PM
on Sat, 06 Jan 2007 17:23:14 GMT, Richard Evans >
wrote:

> My mother died on December 29th. Molly had spent several weeks alone
> before her death and was very stressed by her absence. We moved her to
> my niece's house, but a vet checkup revealed numerous system failures,
> probably brought on by the disruption in her routine. We will probably
> have to put her down.

Oh, I'm so sorry to hear all of this. You have my deepest sympathy.

I wonder if a cat can die of a broken heart? I know my great uncle did
after my great aunt died. Their bond was that strong.

--
Lynne

http://picasaweb.google.com/what.the.hell.is.it/

"First get your facts; then you may distort them at your leisure."
-- Mark Twain

Lynne
January 6th 07, 07:42 PM
on Sat, 06 Jan 2007 17:23:14 GMT, Richard Evans >
wrote:

> a vet checkup revealed numerous system failures,
> probably brought on by the disruption in her routine. We will probably
> have to put her down.

I forgot to say that having her PTS sounds like the right thing to do.
Cats are very stoic and she is probably in a lot of pain. If her systems
are failing, putting her down is the kindest thing you can do for her.

--
Lynne

http://picasaweb.google.com/what.the.hell.is.it/

"First get your facts; then you may distort them at your leisure."
-- Mark Twain

Richard Evans
January 25th 07, 02:36 AM
Lynne > wrote:

>on Sat, 06 Jan 2007 17:23:14 GMT, Richard Evans >
>wrote:
>
>> a vet checkup revealed numerous system failures,
>> probably brought on by the disruption in her routine. We will probably
>> have to put her down.
>
>I forgot to say that having her PTS sounds like the right thing to do.
>Cats are very stoic and she is probably in a lot of pain. If her systems
>are failing, putting her down is the kindest thing you can do for her.

Molly died tonight. She had showed signs of recovery and was eating on
her own. My niece was holding her and she just had a seizure and died.

At 22 years, she had a good run.

cybercat
January 25th 07, 02:47 AM
"Richard Evans" > wrote in message
...
> Lynne > wrote:
>
>>on Sat, 06 Jan 2007 17:23:14 GMT, Richard Evans >
>>wrote:
>>
>>> a vet checkup revealed numerous system failures,
>>> probably brought on by the disruption in her routine. We will probably
>>> have to put her down.
>>
>>I forgot to say that having her PTS sounds like the right thing to do.
>>Cats are very stoic and she is probably in a lot of pain. If her systems
>>are failing, putting her down is the kindest thing you can do for her.
>
> Molly died tonight. She had showed signs of recovery and was eating on
> her own. My niece was holding her and she just had a seizure and died.
>
> At 22 years, she had a good run.

Richard--you were very kind to Molly. I'm sorry for your loss.

mlbriggs
January 25th 07, 06:53 AM
On Wed, 24 Jan 2007 20:36:49 -0500, Richard Evans wrote:

> Lynne > wrote:
>
>>on Sat, 06 Jan 2007 17:23:14 GMT, Richard Evans >
>>wrote:
>>
>>> a vet checkup revealed numerous system failures,
>>> probably brought on by the disruption in her routine. We will probably
>>> have to put her down.
>>
>>I forgot to say that having her PTS sounds like the right thing to do.
>>Cats are very stoic and she is probably in a lot of pain. If her systems
>>are failing, putting her down is the kindest thing you can do for her.
>
> Molly died tonight. She had showed signs of recovery and was eating on
> her own. My niece was holding her and she just had a seizure and died.
>
> At 22 years, she had a good run.


",,,Rise up slowly, Angel. It's hard to let you go..."
Sincere condolences. MLB

Alan
January 25th 07, 12:09 PM
"Richard Evans" > wrote in message
...
> Lynne > wrote:
>
> >on Sat, 06 Jan 2007 17:23:14 GMT, Richard Evans >
> >wrote:
> >
> >> a vet checkup revealed numerous system failures,
> >> probably brought on by the disruption in her routine. We will probably
> >> have to put her down.
> >
> >I forgot to say that having her PTS sounds like the right thing to do.
> >Cats are very stoic and she is probably in a lot of pain. If her systems
> >are failing, putting her down is the kindest thing you can do for her.
>
> Molly died tonight. She had showed signs of recovery and was eating on
> her own. My niece was holding her and she just had a seizure and died.
>
> At 22 years, she had a good run.

Regrets on the loss of your critter. Yep, 22 years is a good run. Their
spirit lives on.
Alan