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December 14th 06, 01:08 AM
My cat is not a grazer. He can not leave any food in his bowl so we
have put him on a schedule. He eats when we get up in the am and when
we get home. The problem is that he begins to try to wake us up around
5:00 am everyday - instead of waiting for the alarm clock like he used
to. I was thinking that I would start waiting to feed him until I was
about to leave the house instead.

1) is this cruel?
2) any suggestions on how to turn him into a grazer?
3) how long until he stops crying because he isn't getting fed first
thing in the am?

Thanks for your advice.

KitKat's Mom

Cheryl
December 14th 06, 01:37 AM
On Wed 13 Dec 2006 08:08:13p, wrote in rec.pets.cats.health+behav
ups.com>:

> My cat is not a grazer. He can not leave any food in his bowl
> so we have put him on a schedule. He eats when we get up in the
> am and when we get home. The problem is that he begins to try
> to wake us up around 5:00 am everyday - instead of waiting for
> the alarm clock like he used to. I was thinking that I would
> start waiting to feed him until I was about to leave the house
> instead.
>
> 1) is this cruel?
> 2) any suggestions on how to turn him into a grazer?
> 3) how long until he stops crying because he isn't getting fed
> first thing in the am?
>
> Thanks for your advice.
>
> KitKat's Mom
>
>

I think this is a good plan. I don't feed my four immediately when
I get up in the morning, and I don't feed them right when I get
home at night. They used to think they could come wake me up and
I'd feed them, but when I didn't, they got used to it. It isn't
cruel at all.

--
Cheryl

December 14th 06, 02:54 AM
Thanks cheryl, he is kind of stuborn. How long do you think we will
have to live through the crying before he gets used to it?


Cheryl wrote:
> On Wed 13 Dec 2006 08:08:13p, wrote in rec.pets.cats.health+behav
> ups.com>:
>
> > My cat is not a grazer. He can not leave any food in his bowl
> > so we have put him on a schedule. He eats when we get up in the
> > am and when we get home. The problem is that he begins to try
> > to wake us up around 5:00 am everyday - instead of waiting for
> > the alarm clock like he used to. I was thinking that I would
> > start waiting to feed him until I was about to leave the house
> > instead.
> >
> > 1) is this cruel?
> > 2) any suggestions on how to turn him into a grazer?
> > 3) how long until he stops crying because he isn't getting fed
> > first thing in the am?
> >
> > Thanks for your advice.
> >
> > KitKat's Mom
> >
> >
>
> I think this is a good plan. I don't feed my four immediately when
> I get up in the morning, and I don't feed them right when I get
> home at night. They used to think they could come wake me up and
> I'd feed them, but when I didn't, they got used to it. It isn't
> cruel at all.
>
> --
> Cheryl

December 14th 06, 02:55 AM
Thanks cheryl, he is kind of stuborn. How long do you think we will
have to live through the crying before he gets used to it?


Cheryl wrote:
> On Wed 13 Dec 2006 08:08:13p, wrote in rec.pets.cats.health+behav
> ups.com>:
>
> > My cat is not a grazer. He can not leave any food in his bowl
> > so we have put him on a schedule. He eats when we get up in the
> > am and when we get home. The problem is that he begins to try
> > to wake us up around 5:00 am everyday - instead of waiting for
> > the alarm clock like he used to. I was thinking that I would
> > start waiting to feed him until I was about to leave the house
> > instead.
> >
> > 1) is this cruel?
> > 2) any suggestions on how to turn him into a grazer?
> > 3) how long until he stops crying because he isn't getting fed
> > first thing in the am?
> >
> > Thanks for your advice.
> >
> > KitKat's Mom
> >
> >
>
> I think this is a good plan. I don't feed my four immediately when
> I get up in the morning, and I don't feed them right when I get
> home at night. They used to think they could come wake me up and
> I'd feed them, but when I didn't, they got used to it. It isn't
> cruel at all.
>
> --
> Cheryl

Lynne
December 14th 06, 03:08 AM
on Thu, 14 Dec 2006 02:55:52 GMT, wrote:

> Thanks cheryl, he is kind of stuborn. How long do you think we will
> have to live through the crying before he gets used to it?

I'm not Cheryl, but I do know that some cats adapt in just a few days. My
weirdo cat, Rudy, *still* cries at breakfast and dinner time even though
we've had an automatic feeder in place for weeks. I have to go jiggle the
food with my finger before he'll jump up to his shelf and start eating.
Hehe.

--
Lynne

http://picasaweb.google.com/what.the.hell.is.it/

Cheryl
December 14th 06, 03:11 AM
On Wed 13 Dec 2006 09:55:52p, wrote in rec.pets.cats.health+behav
oups.com>:

> Thanks cheryl, he is kind of stuborn. How long do you think we
> will have to live through the crying before he gets used to it?
>
>
Hehe, depends on your endurance. I just ignore them. I'm stubborn,
too. :) They're fed at 6am and about 5:30pm-6pm, sometimes later.
If it's later than 6 when I get home from work, I will feed them
after I get in, change clothes, and turn on the news, so they only
have to wait then about 15 minutes. The key is to not immediately
do it as soon as you walk in the door.

My worse offender is a former feral girl, and she'll climb on my
chest and yowl at me as soon as she thinks I'm awake. That's better
than when she used to jump on me to wake me up! With some of them
it can probably take some time.

So how obnoxious is he when he tries to wake you up?


--
Cheryl

December 14th 06, 12:26 PM
He has actually gotten better. I keep a squirt bottle by my bed now.
He used to jump up and he got some nice blasts. Now he will only put
his front paws up on the bed and cry...or just stand in front of the
door depending on wether he has seen the bottle come out. Basically
from approx 5 am to 6:30 when I get up I have to keep the bottle in my
hand and jiggle it so he hears the water before he will run away for at
least 15 min.

On Dec 13, 10:11 pm, Cheryl > wrote:
> On Wed 13 Dec 2006 09:55:52p, wrote in rec.pets.cats.health+behav
> oups.com>:
>
> > Thanks cheryl, he is kind of stuborn. How long do you think we
> > will have to live through the crying before he gets used to it?Hehe, depends on your endurance. I just ignore them. I'm stubborn,
> too. :) They're fed at 6am and about 5:30pm-6pm, sometimes later.
> If it's later than 6 when I get home from work, I will feed them
> after I get in, change clothes, and turn on the news, so they only
> have to wait then about 15 minutes. The key is to not immediately
> do it as soon as you walk in the door.
>
> My worse offender is a former feral girl, and she'll climb on my
> chest and yowl at me as soon as she thinks I'm awake. That's better
> than when she used to jump on me to wake me up! With some of them
> it can probably take some time.
>
> So how obnoxious is he when he tries to wake you up?
>
> --
> Cheryl

December 14th 06, 12:27 PM
That is not encouraging!! :O)

We considered the auto feeder, but felt the same issue would happen.
How would he even know to go check befor trying to wake us up?


On Dec 13, 10:08 pm, Lynne > wrote:
> on Thu, 14 Dec 2006 02:55:52 GMT, wrote:
>
> > Thanks cheryl, he is kind of stuborn. How long do you think we will
> > have to live through the crying before he gets used to it?I'm not Cheryl, but I do know that some cats adapt in just a few days. My
> weirdo cat, Rudy, *still* cries at breakfast and dinner time even though
> we've had an automatic feeder in place for weeks. I have to go jiggle the
> food with my finger before he'll jump up to his shelf and start eating.
> Hehe.
>
> --
> Lynne
>
> http://picasaweb.google.com/what.the.hell.is.it/

StephanieM
December 15th 06, 12:40 AM
I don't think they would check, as they are used to the routine. I got
to where I left some food in their bowls at night so the anxiety wasn't
there over empty food bowls in the morning. Now, even if their bowls
are pretty full, they will still want to be "fed". So I look at the
food, and then they start eating.

Go figure!
StephanieM

Cheryl
December 15th 06, 01:04 AM
On Thu 14 Dec 2006 07:26:00a, wrote in rec.pets.cats.health+behav
ups.com>:

> He has actually gotten better. I keep a squirt bottle by my bed
> now. He used to jump up and he got some nice blasts. Now he
> will only put his front paws up on the bed and cry...or just
> stand in front of the door depending on wether he has seen the
> bottle come out. Basically from approx 5 am to 6:30 when I get
> up I have to keep the bottle in my hand and jiggle it so he
> hears the water before he will run away for at least 15 min.

I guess I just don't consider this intolerable behavior. I don't
use water bottles for a couple of reasons - they are ineffective,
and they can invoke fear. Ineffective because your cat isn't going
to associate your reaction to his want for food, and your desire
for him to stop begging, especially since you are in bed and not
the kitchen. He's going to associate the water squirtings to his
general interaction with you. You can already see that because he
runs from your room when you jiggle the water bottle. You have
invoked a fear response, not trained him to wait for a meal until
you have gone to the kitchen.

--
Cheryl

m4816k
December 15th 06, 12:49 PM
> wrote in message
ups.com...
> My cat is not a grazer. He can not leave any food in his bowl so we
> have put him on a schedule. He eats when we get up in the am and when
> we get home. The problem is that he begins to try to wake us up around
> 5:00 am everyday - instead of waiting for the alarm clock like he used
> to. I was thinking that I would start waiting to feed him until I was
> about to leave the house instead.
>
> 1) is this cruel?
> 2) any suggestions on how to turn him into a grazer?
> 3) how long until he stops crying because he isn't getting fed first
> thing in the am?
>
> Thanks for your advice.
>
> KitKat's Mom
>

Cats, just like dogs (or kids, for that matter), need rules. And eventhough
they're stubborn, they can be trained to a point. But be persistent, cause
if you don't train her, she will train you...very efficiently:-)

Rene S.
December 15th 06, 09:48 PM
> I guess I just don't consider this intolerable behavior. I don't
> use water bottles for a couple of reasons - they are ineffective,
> and they can invoke fear. Ineffective because your cat isn't going
> to associate your reaction to his want for food, and your desire
> for him to stop begging, especially since you are in bed and not
> the kitchen. He's going to associate the water squirtings to his
> general interaction with you. You can already see that because he
> runs from your room when you jiggle the water bottle. You have
> invoked a fear response, not trained him to wait for a meal until
> you have gone to the kitchen.
>
> --
> Cheryl

I agree with Cheryl. I don't use a water bottle either. If one of the
cats starts acting up before the alarm (which is rare), I will simply
lock them out of the bedroom. It doesn't matter if it's 5 minutes
before the alarm or an hour, I will not say a word, and gently pick
them up and put them outside of the door. Neither cat likes to be
separated from us, so they quickly learned that waking us up early =
separation. I rarely have to do this anymore.

December 15th 06, 11:52 PM
Good point.....I have trouble with the whole..dont' punish for
bad.....reward for good thing.

On Dec 14, 8:04 pm, Cheryl > wrote:
> On Thu 14 Dec 2006 07:26:00a, wrote in rec.pets.cats.health+behav
> ups.com>:
>
> > He has actually gotten better. I keep a squirt bottle by my bed
> > now. He used to jump up and he got some nice blasts. Now he
> > will only put his front paws up on the bed and cry...or just
> > stand in front of the door depending on wether he has seen the
> > bottle come out. Basically from approx 5 am to 6:30 when I get
> > up I have to keep the bottle in my hand and jiggle it so he
> > hears the water before he will run away for at least 15 min.I guess I just don't consider this intolerable behavior. I don't
> use water bottles for a couple of reasons - they are ineffective,
> and they can invoke fear. Ineffective because your cat isn't going
> to associate your reaction to his want for food, and your desire
> for him to stop begging, especially since you are in bed and not
> the kitchen. He's going to associate the water squirtings to his
> general interaction with you. You can already see that because he
> runs from your room when you jiggle the water bottle. You have
> invoked a fear response, not trained him to wait for a meal until
> you have gone to the kitchen.
>
> --
> Cheryl