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bluemaxx
December 14th 06, 11:13 PM
I was wondering if human antibiotics can be cut down to equal, say, Clavamox
125 mg. I have been feeding a feral cat for 4 years now, and he's finally
moved onto my deck, thanks to a wonderful shelter my BIL built for him this
year. But he gets respiratory infections at least once during the winters.

The human antibiotic I have is "400mg EES Filmtab by Abbott". I figured if
I could cut it into quarters to dose him with. Or would that be dangerous?
Thanks for any help.
Linda

-L.
December 14th 06, 11:47 PM
bluemaxx wrote:
> I was wondering if human antibiotics can be cut down to equal, say, Clavamox
> 125 mg. I have been feeding a feral cat for 4 years now, and he's finally
> moved onto my deck, thanks to a wonderful shelter my BIL built for him this
> year. But he gets respiratory infections at least once during the winters.
>
> The human antibiotic I have is "400mg EES Filmtab by Abbott". I figured if
> I could cut it into quarters to dose him with. Or would that be dangerous?
> Thanks for any help.
> Linda

Never do this. The antibiotic may not be effective for the disease the
cat has - they all have different modes of action, different activity
spectrums, different formulations and different toxicities. I would
never dose a cat with a human antibiotic - or any other drug - unless
I was 100% sure the drug was exactly the same as what was prescribed by
a vet.

-L.

Matthew
December 15th 06, 02:26 AM
YES DANGEROUS VERY DANGEROUS

NEVER EVER GIVE HUMAN MEDICATION TO ANY ANIMAL UNLESS DIRECTED SO BY A
VETERINARIAN


"bluemaxx" > wrote in message
. ..
>I was wondering if human antibiotics can be cut down to equal, say,
>Clavamox
> 125 mg. I have been feeding a feral cat for 4 years now, and he's finally
> moved onto my deck, thanks to a wonderful shelter my BIL built for him
> this
> year. But he gets respiratory infections at least once during the
> winters.
>
> The human antibiotic I have is "400mg EES Filmtab by Abbott". I figured
> if
> I could cut it into quarters to dose him with. Or would that be
> dangerous?
> Thanks for any help.
> Linda
>
>

AZ Nomad
December 15th 06, 02:29 AM
On Thu, 14 Dec 2006 17:13:03 -0600, bluemaxx > wrote:


>I was wondering if human antibiotics can be cut down to equal, say, Clavamox
>125 mg. I have been feeding a feral cat for 4 years now, and he's finally
>moved onto my deck, thanks to a wonderful shelter my BIL built for him this
>year. But he gets respiratory infections at least once during the winters.

>The human antibiotic I have is "400mg EES Filmtab by Abbott". I figured if
>I could cut it into quarters to dose him with. Or would that be dangerous?

Please do me a favor: don't ever ask such a question on usenet again.
Read some bad advice, take it, and you're kitty could end up dead.
Can't you afford a vet?

bluemaxx
December 15th 06, 02:44 AM
Thanks for your rational response, L. It's exactly what I needed to know.
I appreciate it.

It just makes me sick with worrying to see if he's going to recover each
time he (Mr. Skittles, aka Feral) has an URI.
Linda

"-L." > wrote in message
ups.com...
: Never do this. The antibiotic may not be effective for the disease the
: cat has - they all have different modes of action, different activity
: spectrums, different formulations and different toxicities. I would
: never dose a cat with a human antibiotic - or any other drug - unless
: I was 100% sure the drug was exactly the same as what was prescribed by
: a vet.
:
: -L.
:

bluemaxx
December 15th 06, 02:44 AM
What part of "feral cat" did you not understand?

"AZ Nomad" > wrote in message
...
: Please do me a favor: don't ever ask such a question on usenet again.
: Read some bad advice, take it, and you're kitty could end up dead.
: Can't you afford a vet?
:

AZ Nomad
December 15th 06, 02:55 AM
On Thu, 14 Dec 2006 20:44:26 -0600, bluemaxx > wrote:


>What part of "feral cat" did you not understand?

So it's OK to be incredibly reckless with ferals? Got tired of putting out
antifreeze and chocolate for them?

Lynne
December 15th 06, 02:57 AM
on Fri, 15 Dec 2006 02:44:26 GMT, "bluemaxx" >
wrote:

> What part of "feral cat" did you not understand?
>
> "AZ Nomad" > wrote in message
> ...
>: Please do me a favor: don't ever ask such a question on usenet again.
>: Read some bad advice, take it, and you're kitty could end up dead.
>: Can't you afford a vet?

Talk to your vet about this cat. He may be sympathetic and prescribe
antibiotics. The trouble is, though, that you need to administer the full
course, and I can't imagine how you will accomplish that without trapping
the cat and keeping him confined in order to do so.

--
Lynne

http://picasaweb.google.com/what.the.hell.is.it/

bluemaxx
December 15th 06, 03:01 AM
If I was "incredibly reckless with ferals", I would have gone ahead and
given the human antibiotic to the cat... instead of posting in here, asking
for information... and then having dickwads like you ASSume things and flame
me for asking. HAND

"AZ Nomad" > wrote in message
...
: On Thu, 14 Dec 2006 20:44:26 -0600, bluemaxx >
wrote:
:
:
: >What part of "feral cat" did you not understand?
:
: So it's OK to be incredibly reckless with ferals? Got tired of putting
out
: antifreeze and chocolate for them?

bluemaxx
December 15th 06, 03:06 AM
I've already asked the vet for a prescription and he denied it, even though
I've brought him stray cats for medical treatment in the past. I won't go
into my whole history of feeding stray and feral cats in here, but the vet
does know of my efforts.

And I have, in the past, simply crushed the pills and administered them in
tuna juice or mixed them into their food. Thanks again, Lynne.
Linda

"Lynne" > wrote in message
m...
: Talk to your vet about this cat. He may be sympathetic and prescribe
: antibiotics. The trouble is, though, that you need to administer the full
: course, and I can't imagine how you will accomplish that without trapping
: the cat and keeping him confined in order to do so.
:
: --
: Lynne
:
: http://picasaweb.google.com/what.the.hell.is.it/

Lynne
December 15th 06, 03:10 AM
on Fri, 15 Dec 2006 03:06:34 GMT, "bluemaxx" >
wrote:

> I've already asked the vet for a prescription and he denied it, even
> though I've brought him stray cats for medical treatment in the past.
> I won't go into my whole history of feeding stray and feral cats in
> here, but the vet does know of my efforts.

what an unsympathetic ******* (the vet). Perhaps you can contact a local
cat group (rescue, shelter?) and explain the situation. They may work with
a vet who will prescribe an antibiotic.

--
Lynne

http://picasaweb.google.com/what.the.hell.is.it/

bluemaxx
December 15th 06, 03:31 AM
That's a good idea, Lynne. Thanks again. :)
Linda

"Lynne" > wrote in message
m...
: what an unsympathetic ******* (the vet). Perhaps you can contact a local
: cat group (rescue, shelter?) and explain the situation. They may work
with
: a vet who will prescribe an antibiotic.
:
: --
: Lynne
:
: http://picasaweb.google.com/what.the.hell.is.it/

T
December 15th 06, 09:54 PM
In article om>,
says...
>
> bluemaxx wrote:
> > I was wondering if human antibiotics can be cut down to equal, say, Clavamox
> > 125 mg. I have been feeding a feral cat for 4 years now, and he's finally
> > moved onto my deck, thanks to a wonderful shelter my BIL built for him this
> > year. But he gets respiratory infections at least once during the winters.
> >
> > The human antibiotic I have is "400mg EES Filmtab by Abbott". I figured if
> > I could cut it into quarters to dose him with. Or would that be dangerous?
> > Thanks for any help.
> > Linda
>
> Never do this. The antibiotic may not be effective for the disease the
> cat has - they all have different modes of action, different activity
> spectrums, different formulations and different toxicities. I would
> never dose a cat with a human antibiotic - or any other drug - unless
> I was 100% sure the drug was exactly the same as what was prescribed by
> a vet.
>
> -L.
>
>

While what you say is true, many of the pharmaceuticals used for animals
are the same as the human versions. For example, Emily was on
prednisolone before she died. I was on the same thing, different dosage
for an ear problem.

-L.
December 16th 06, 01:11 AM
T wrote:
> While what you say is true, many of the pharmaceuticals used for animals
> are the same as the human versions. For example, Emily was on
> prednisolone before she died. I was on the same thing, different dosage
> for an ear problem.

Correct - and that is why I said this: " I would
never dose a cat with a human antibiotic - or any other drug - unless
I was 100% sure the drug was exactly the same as what was prescribed by
a vet. "

-L.

your pappa
December 16th 06, 03:31 PM
bluemaxx wrote:

> The human antibiotic I have is "400mg EES Filmtab by Abbott". I figured if
> I could cut it into quarters to dose him with. Or would that be dangerous?
> Thanks for any help.
> Linda

most meds don't line up, most topical solutions are fine.. like an
ointment or stringent

-L.
December 17th 06, 11:01 AM
your pappa wrote:
> bluemaxx wrote:
>
> > The human antibiotic I have is "400mg EES Filmtab by Abbott". I figured if
> > I could cut it into quarters to dose him with. Or would that be dangerous?
> > Thanks for any help.
> > Linda
>
> most meds don't line up, most topical solutions are fine.. like an
> ointment or stringent

No, actually they are not. Ointments, especially, can cause abscesses
because the antibiotics in them don't work on many of the bacteria
which cats carry. So in essence, all the ointment does is seals the
wound and causes it to abscess. The only topical solution made for
humans that I would ever recommned using on a cat is hydrogen
peroxide, and I would use that only once on a fresh wound to help clean
it. It kills living tissue, so you never want to use it on a wound
that is healing ( in cats or humans).

Stick to gambling and tokin', Barry. You are no friend to cats.

-L.

santa claus
December 17th 06, 09:37 PM
-L. wrote:

> No, actually they are not. Ointments, especially, can cause abscesses
> because the antibiotics in them don't work on many of the bacteria
> which cats carry. So in essence, all the ointment does is seals the
> wound and causes it to abscess. The only topical solution made for
> humans that I would ever recommned using on a cat is hydrogen
> peroxide, and I would use that only once on a fresh wound to help clean
> it. It kills living tissue, so you never want to use it on a wound
> that is healing ( in cats or humans).
>
> Stick to gambling and tokin', Barry. You are no friend to cats.
>
> -L.

this would be where I am leaving you standing there.