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December 17th 06, 04:35 AM
Rene S alerted me to questionable ingredients in some of the prescription
food, and sure enough I saw this one that really scared me:

Ethoxyquin

A Google search turns up:

http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=Ethoxyquin&btnG=Google+Search&ie=UTF-8
&oe=UTF-8&sa=N&tab=gw

and all these posts:

http://groups.google.com/group/rec.pets.cats.health+behav/search?
q=Ethoxyquin+&start=0&scoring=d&hl=en&


Should I ask for a refund and return the food?

Victor Martinez
December 17th 06, 04:44 AM
wrote:
> Should I ask for a refund and return the food?

I would. Try Innova Evo, it's the best cat food out there.

--
Victor M. Martinez
Owned and operated by the Fantastic Seven (TM)
Send your spam here:
Email me here:

Jack Campin - bogus address
December 17th 06, 11:02 AM
> Rene S alerted me to questionable ingredients in some of the prescription
> food, and sure enough I saw this one that really scared me:
> Ethoxyquin
> A Google search turns up:
> <http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=Ethoxyquin&btnG=Google+Search&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&sa=N&tab=gw>
> and all these posts:
> <http://groups.google.com/group/rec.pets.cats.health+behav/search?q=Ethoxyquin+&start=0&scoring=d&hl=en&>
> Should I ask for a refund and return the food?

The stuff you quote there suggests it's a scare whipped up by people
who like to feel conspired against.

I didn't see a single instance where it might even remotely have
been implicated in a cat's health problem.

============== j-c ====== @ ====== purr . demon . co . uk ==============
Jack Campin: 11 Third St, Newtongrange EH22 4PU, Scotland | tel 0131 660 4760
<http://www.purr.demon.co.uk/jack/> for CD-ROMs and free | fax 0870 0554 975
stuff: Scottish music, food intolerance, & Mac logic fonts | mob 07800 739 557

December 17th 06, 06:37 PM
Jack Campin - bogus address > wrote in
:

>> Rene S alerted me to questionable ingredients in some of the
>> prescription food, and sure enough I saw this one that really scared
>> me: Ethoxyquin
>> A Google search turns up:
>> <http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=Ethoxyquin&btnG=Google+Search&ie
>> =UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&sa=N&tab=gw> and all these posts:
>> <http://groups.google.com/group/rec.pets.cats.health+behav/search?q=Et
>> hoxyquin+&start=0&scoring=d&hl=en&> Should I ask for a refund and
>> return the food?
>
> The stuff you quote there suggests it's a scare whipped up by people
> who like to feel conspired against.
>
> I didn't see a single instance where it mig


I just found this post by Phil P. from 2002. He seems to indicate that
it's not that dangerous:

http://groups.google.com/group/rec.pets.cats.health+behav/msg/5be3c4a554c
20acc?hl=en&



> wrote in message
...
>
> From: "Chopsly"
> >... Oh, and no, I do not work for Monsanto or Novus.
> >I work for a company that produces feed ingredients.
> >We use EMQ because it is flat out the best antioxidant
> >currently available. We have experimented over the years
> >with replacements, but nothing comes close, and we can't
> >risk our products on unproven, unacceptable antioxidants.
>
> Are you suggesting that all brands of dry cat food contain
> Ethoxyquin even though it may not be listed as an ingredient

A pet food can contain an antioxidant (or any ingredient) without it
being
listed on the label.

The FDA requires pet food manufacturers to list all the ingredients and
sub-ingredients on the labels. However, the Code of Federal Regulations
allows exceptions to this rule. Sub-ingredients could be an antioxidant
added by a supplier and not the manufacturer. IOW, the manufacturer
could
have bought the fat compontent from a supplier already preserved with a
chemical antioxidant. However, in many cases, the decision to include or
exclude a sub-ingredient from the label depends of the amount of that
ingredient in the final product - which is allowed by the Code of
Federal
Regulations.

> or that some brands (such as Nutro Max) contain unproven and
> unacceptable (in terms of safety) antioxidants ?

No. Ethoxyquin has been studied for more than three-quarters of a
century.
The safety range of ethoxyquin is *very* wide and the amount used in pet
foods is not remotely close to dangerous. The amount allowed as a
preservative is 0.015%, which is an extremely low concentration. Any
ingredient can be toxic if cat receives too much.

Chemical preservatives are much more effective and actually safer than
so-called "natural preservatives". Retarding oxidation *consumes*
naturally
occurring antioxidants and results in vitamin deficiency. Chemical
preservatives spare other antioxidants and minimizes vitamin deficiency.

Most people are under the erroneous impression that "Preserved with
Mixed
Tocopherols a Source of Vitamin E" means the cat is getting more vitamin
E.
This is not true. The type of vitamin E used as preservatives are *not*
bioavailable to the cat. The bioavailable form of vitamin E is very
unstable and the amount needed to retard rancidity would be *toxic*.

If you look hard enough you'll find "adverse effects" for almost anything
if
its taken in large enough quantities. It all depends on the agenda of
whose
writing the article... However, there is not a single documented case of
disease or death associated with ethoxyquin, BHT, or BHA in the
Veterinary
Medical Database at Purdue. So all the so-called "reports" and
"studies" of
the perils of chemical antioxidants should be taken with a grain of salt.

Canned foods don't require *any* preservatives.

Phil.

PawsForThought
December 17th 06, 09:11 PM
wrote:
> Jack Campin - bogus address > wrote in
> :
>
> >> Rene S alerted me to questionable ingredients in some of the
> >> prescription food, and sure enough I saw this one that really scared
> >> me: Ethoxyquin
> >> A Google search turns up:
> >> <http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=Ethoxyquin&btnG=Google+Search&ie
> >> =UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&sa=N&tab=gw> and all these posts:
> >> <http://groups.google.com/group/rec.pets.cats.health+behav/search?q=Et
> >> hoxyquin+&start=0&scoring=d&hl=en&> Should I ask for a refund and
> >> return the food?
> >
> > The stuff you quote there suggests it's a scare whipped up by people
> > who like to feel conspired against.
> >
> > I didn't see a single instance where it mig
>
>
> I just found this post by Phil P. from 2002. He seems to indicate that
> it's not that dangerous:
>
> http://groups.google.com/group/rec.pets.cats.health+behav/msg/5be3c4a554c
> 20acc?hl=en&
>
>
>
> > wrote in message
> ...
> >
> > From: "Chopsly"
> > >... Oh, and no, I do not work for Monsanto or Novus.
> > >I work for a company that produces feed ingredients.
> > >We use EMQ because it is flat out the best antioxidant
> > >currently available. We have experimented over the years
> > >with replacements, but nothing comes close, and we can't
> > >risk our products on unproven, unacceptable antioxidants.
> >
> > Are you suggesting that all brands of dry cat food contain
> > Ethoxyquin even though it may not be listed as an ingredient
>
> A pet food can contain an antioxidant (or any ingredient) without it
> being
> listed on the label.
>
> The FDA requires pet food manufacturers to list all the ingredients and
> sub-ingredients on the labels. However, the Code of Federal Regulations
> allows exceptions to this rule. Sub-ingredients could be an antioxidant
> added by a supplier and not the manufacturer. IOW, the manufacturer
> could
> have bought the fat compontent from a supplier already preserved with a
> chemical antioxidant. However, in many cases, the decision to include or
> exclude a sub-ingredient from the label depends of the amount of that
> ingredient in the final product - which is allowed by the Code of
> Federal
> Regulations.
>
> > or that some brands (such as Nutro Max) contain unproven and
> > unacceptable (in terms of safety) antioxidants ?
>
> No. Ethoxyquin has been studied for more than three-quarters of a
> century.
> The safety range of ethoxyquin is *very* wide and the amount used in pet
> foods is not remotely close to dangerous. The amount allowed as a
> preservative is 0.015%, which is an extremely low concentration. Any
> ingredient can be toxic if cat receives too much.
>
> Chemical preservatives are much more effective and actually safer than
> so-called "natural preservatives". Retarding oxidation *consumes*
> naturally
> occurring antioxidants and results in vitamin deficiency. Chemical
> preservatives spare other antioxidants and minimizes vitamin deficiency.
>
> Most people are under the erroneous impression that "Preserved with
> Mixed
> Tocopherols a Source of Vitamin E" means the cat is getting more vitamin
> E.
> This is not true. The type of vitamin E used as preservatives are *not*
> bioavailable to the cat. The bioavailable form of vitamin E is very
> unstable and the amount needed to retard rancidity would be *toxic*.
>
> If you look hard enough you'll find "adverse effects" for almost anything
> if
> its taken in large enough quantities. It all depends on the agenda of
> whose
> writing the article... However, there is not a single documented case of
> disease or death associated with ethoxyquin, BHT, or BHA in the
> Veterinary
> Medical Database at Purdue. So all the so-called "reports" and
> "studies" of
> the perils of chemical antioxidants should be taken with a grain of salt.
>
> Canned foods don't require *any* preservatives.
>
> Phil.

PawsForThought
December 17th 06, 09:14 PM
wrote:
> >> Rene S alerted me to questionable ingredients in some of the
> >> prescription food, and sure enough I saw this one that really scared
> >> me: Ethoxyquin

There has been discussion in the past about using it in petfoods, and
conflicting information. Personally I wouldn't feed any foods
containing it to my cats, but that's just me. My opinion is since
there are other options out there, why feed a food with questionable
ingredients. Of course these are your cats and you need to be the one
to decide what's in their best interest.

Rene S.
December 18th 06, 02:07 PM
PawsForThought wrote:
> wrote:
> > >> Rene S alerted me to questionable ingredients in some of the
> > >> prescription food, and sure enough I saw this one that really scared
> > >> me: Ethoxyquin
>
> There has been discussion in the past about using it in petfoods, and
> conflicting information. Personally I wouldn't feed any foods
> containing it to my cats, but that's just me. My opinion is since
> there are other options out there, why feed a food with questionable
> ingredients. Of course these are your cats and you need to be the one
> to decide what's in their best interest.

I agree. If you're feeling uncomfortable about this, return the food
and try another brand.