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Lynne
December 17th 06, 03:08 PM
The 2 girls who live across the street brought a gray kitten over just now
to see if he was Levi. He looks remarkably like him, even around the same
age, but of course Levi is safe inside our house.

The kitten looks well fed and healthy, and he may even be neutered. I'm
not sure, though. Levi has huge testicles, and this kitten either has
smaller ones, or he was neutered and he has a lot of scrotum left. I
really couldn't tell.

The little guy was super friendly, but had no collar. Very frustrating.
I told the girls to take a couple of photos and post signs, because he
looks like someone's well cared for pet. If no one claims him, they want
to give him to us (unless they can talk their parents into keeping him).

This is the risk that anyone who lets their cats roam faces. That beloved
pet may end up as someone else's.

--
Lynne

http://picasaweb.google.com/what.the.hell.is.it/

Lynne
December 17th 06, 03:17 PM
on Sun, 17 Dec 2006 15:08:07 GMT, Lynne >
wrote:

> This is the risk that anyone who lets their cats roam faces. That
> beloved pet may end up as someone else's.

I should have said, "this is ONE of the risks, among many other, far worse
risks."

--
Lynne

http://picasaweb.google.com/what.the.hell.is.it/

December 17th 06, 05:00 PM
In article >,
Lynne > wrote:

> The little guy was super friendly, but had no collar. Very frustrating.
> I told the girls to take a couple of photos and post signs, because he
> looks like someone's well cared for pet. If no one claims him, they want
> to give him to us (unless they can talk their parents into keeping him).
>
> This is the risk that anyone who lets their cats roam faces. That beloved
> pet may end up as someone else's.

Also, take him to a vet and have him scanned for ID chipping. Yet
another opportunity to remind owners that if they have their pet
chipped, it still should have a collar or some other form of
notification to anyone finding it.

--
Christmas, what other time of the year do you sit in front of a dead tree
and eat candy out of your socks?

cindys
December 17th 06, 05:36 PM
"Lynne" > wrote in message
m...
> The 2 girls who live across the street brought a gray kitten over just now
> to see if he was Levi. He looks remarkably like him, even around the same
> age, but of course Levi is safe inside our house.
>
> The kitten looks well fed and healthy, and he may even be neutered. I'm
> not sure, though. Levi has huge testicles, and this kitten either has
> smaller ones, or he was neutered and he has a lot of scrotum left. I
> really couldn't tell.
>
> The little guy was super friendly, but had no collar. Very frustrating.
> I told the girls to take a couple of photos and post signs, because he
> looks like someone's well cared for pet. If no one claims him, they want
> to give him to us (unless they can talk their parents into keeping him).
>
> This is the risk that anyone who lets their cats roam faces. That beloved
> pet may end up as someone else's.
--------
I had a similar experience a few weeks ago. The older sister of one of my
little son's friends brought me a *stray* kitten. The kitten looked to be
about two months old. I asked the girl how she could be sure this was a
stray and not someone's pet ? I asked her where was the mother cat? The girl
told me that their neighborhood was full of stray cats. She stated that one
of the neighbors had even phoned Animal Control, but Animal Control said
they didn't pick up stray cats (only stray dogs) because stray cats often
turned out to be someone's pets. The little girl told me that the kitten had
been hanging out at her house for a while, and she had fed her, but her
mother didn't want any cats and the kitten was cold. The cat was kind of
dirty and skinny with no collar. The weather prediction was for snow and
freezing temperatures overnight. So, I took the kitten in. I already have
four other cats plus a foster. I fixed up the basement guest room for the
kitten (since I didn't want to expose my other cats to a kitten that could
be carrying all sorts of diseases, even though my other cats are all
up-to-date on vaccinations). I spent the entire evening and part of the
night trying to figure out what I was going to do about this kitten (try to
keep her or beg one of the no-kill shelters to take her in). I was already
responsible for five other cats.

The next morning, the little girl phoned me. The kitten's owners had been
searching the neighborhood for her. She had gotten out of their garage. It
was such a relief when they came to get her. They explained that the mother
cat was recovering from her spaying surgery when the kitten ran out. But the
kitten was apparently allowed to roam anyway because they expressed surprise
when they found out she had used a litter box at my house. They said that
the kitten had never used a litter box before. They said the kitten was
actually three months old. I wanted to ask them if they had considered
having the mother spayed *before* she got pregnant. I also wanted to ask
them if they were planning on having the kitten spayed *before* she went
into heat. (One of my permanent cats began as a six or seven-month old
pregnant foster cat from a shelter). At any rate, my story is a perfect
illustration of your point. Sigh. If cats are going to be allowed to roam,
they should at least be spayed/neutered and have collars.
Best regards,
---Cindy S.

Lynne
December 17th 06, 05:54 PM
on Sun, 17 Dec 2006 17:00:11 GMT, wrote:

> Also, take him to a vet and have him scanned for ID chipping. Yet
> another opportunity to remind owners that if they have their pet
> chipped, it still should have a collar or some other form of
> notification to anyone finding it.

I'll suggest this to the parents of the girls who found him.

--
Lynne

http://picasaweb.google.com/what.the.hell.is.it/

Lynne
December 17th 06, 06:04 PM
on Sun, 17 Dec 2006 17:36:59 GMT, "cindys" >
wrote:

> Sigh. If cats are going to be allowed to roam,
> they should at least be spayed/neutered and have collars.

People who let intact cats roam are complete idiots and REALLY **** me off.

--
Lynne

http://picasaweb.google.com/what.the.hell.is.it/

December 17th 06, 07:40 PM
In article >,
Lynne > wrote:

> on Sun, 17 Dec 2006 17:00:11 GMT, wrote:
>
> > Also, take him to a vet and have him scanned for ID chipping. Yet
> > another opportunity to remind owners that if they have their pet
> > chipped, it still should have a collar or some other form of
> > notification to anyone finding it.
>
> I'll suggest this to the parents of the girls who found him.

Most vets and all Humane shelters will check for chips for free (frugal
minded :-)

--
Christmas, what other time of the year do you sit in front of a dead tree
and eat candy out of your socks?

Phil P.
December 18th 06, 06:24 AM
"Lynne" > wrote in message
m...
> The 2 girls who live across the street brought a gray kitten over just now
> to see if he was Levi. He looks remarkably like him, even around the same
> age, but of course Levi is safe inside our house.
>
> The kitten looks well fed and healthy, and he may even be neutered. I'm
> not sure, though. Levi has huge testicles, and this kitten either has
> smaller ones, or he was neutered and he has a lot of scrotum left. I
> really couldn't tell.
>
> The little guy was super friendly, but had no collar. Very frustrating.
> I told the girls to take a couple of photos and post signs, because he
> looks like someone's well cared for pet. If no one claims him, they want
> to give him to us (unless they can talk their parents into keeping him).
>
> This is the risk that anyone who lets their cats roam faces. That beloved
> pet may end up as someone else's.

Absotively! Super friendly and affectionate cats usually never make it to a
shelter because the finders keep them.

Lynne
December 20th 06, 11:51 PM
on Mon, 18 Dec 2006 06:24:31 GMT, "Phil P." > wrote:

> Absotively! Super friendly and affectionate cats usually never make
> it to a shelter because the finders keep them.

Well it looks like that is exactly what is going to happen with this
kitten... I just spoke with my neigbhors and they have decided they are
keeping him unless the owner puts up flyers--so basically they are not
going to lift a finger to find out if he is anyone's pet. I previously
suggested taking him to a vet to have him scanned for a chip and even
offered to do it for them, but they aren't going to do that.

While I feel very strongly that whoever owned that kitten should have kept
him inside, I also feel badly for whoever is missing him. And I'm sure
someone is missing him. A kitten that friendly and healthy was obviously
someone's baby.

--
Lynne

http://picasaweb.google.com/what.the.hell.is.it/

Phil P.
December 21st 06, 03:43 AM
"Lynne" > wrote in message
m...
> on Mon, 18 Dec 2006 06:24:31 GMT, "Phil P." > wrote:
>
> > Absotively! Super friendly and affectionate cats usually never make
> > it to a shelter because the finders keep them.
>
> Well it looks like that is exactly what is going to happen with this
> kitten... I just spoke with my neigbhors and they have decided they are
> keeping him unless the owner puts up flyers--so basically they are not
> going to lift a finger to find out if he is anyone's pet. I previously
> suggested taking him to a vet to have him scanned for a chip and even
> offered to do it for them, but they aren't going to do that.
>
> While I feel very strongly that whoever owned that kitten should have kept
> him inside, I also feel badly for whoever is missing him. And I'm sure
> someone is missing him. A kitten that friendly and healthy was obviously
> someone's baby.

The kitten might have escaped and might be someone's dearly loved pet. Your
neighbors should at least report the kitten as found to your local AC or
police or whichever agency handles animal matters in your town without
turning over the cat. They should give a general, not detailed description
of the cat to prevent false claims by unscrupulous people. That's the right
thing to do. They should also have the cat scanned. Most ACOs will scan a
pet at no charge.

I wish we could report all new cats in our colonies as found because some
were clearly former pets, but unfortunately, we can only report cats found
in the towns where TNR is permitted. Otherwise, if AC knew where the
colonies were they would trap and kill the colonies.

Phil

Lynne
December 21st 06, 03:53 AM
on Thu, 21 Dec 2006 03:43:52 GMT, "Phil P." > wrote:

> The kitten might have escaped and might be someone's dearly loved pet.
> Your neighbors should at least report the kitten as found to your
> local AC or police or whichever agency handles animal matters in your
> town without turning over the cat. They should give a general, not
> detailed description of the cat to prevent false claims by
> unscrupulous people. That's the right thing to do. They should also
> have the cat scanned. Most ACOs will scan a pet at no charge.

Those are my thoughts exactly! But they refuse to do anything I have
suggested. I told them *I* would take him to get him scanned and bring
him back! I am going to go over there again tomorrow and talk to them
again. Hopefully I can appeal to their sense of right versus wrong. I
suspect someone is very upset about their missing kitten. He really is
very sweet and obviously well taken care of. If Levi escaped and someone
kept him without trying to find who he belonged to, I would be absolutely
heartbroken!

OTOH, if Levi or Rudy escaped, there would be color flyers up all over
the place... The people who lost him may not have digital cameras or a
computer/printer, though. So frustrating!

> I wish we could report all new cats in our colonies as found because
> some were clearly former pets, but unfortunately, we can only report
> cats found in the towns where TNR is permitted. Otherwise, if AC knew
> where the colonies were they would trap and kill the colonies.

You gotta do what you gotta do, and I completely understand and applaud
what you are doing and how you are doing it, Phil.

--
Lynne

http://picasaweb.google.com/what.the.hell.is.it/