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dgk
December 20th 06, 02:31 PM
The other day there was a cat in the bushes outside my house when I
walked past. He (I'll assume He so I don't call it an it) didn't run
away as I expected, just retreated a bit. It was dark but he appeared
to be a big orange guy. When I looked out a few minutes later, he was
sitting on the walkway looking back at me. So, I opened up a can of
something that my cats are too picky to eat (Trader Joe turkey and
giblets I think) and put half outside for him. A little while later
the food, and he, were gone.

The next night I put out the other half. I never saw a cat but it was
soon gone also. The next night I graduated to putting out the whole
can. That went. There are around three outdoor cats in my neighborhood
so someone is getting some food out of the deal. Last night I added
some treats that my cats don't like. It all went.

I'm about to run out of the food that my guys won't eat, so it looks
like I'll be buying food for the outside kittys from now on. But with
feeding sort of comes some responsibility.

I have no idea whether these cats belong to anyone or whether they are
strays or feral.. That first one certainly didn't seem feral. I was
only a few feet away from him. Someone is apparently marking the area,
judging by a whiff I've noticed. Not stinky enough to be annoying but
my boys suspect that I'm being unfaithful. So I guess someone isn't
fixed.

I suppose I'll keep feeding them and see where it goes. I hadn't
intended to go the trap, neuter, release route but maybe.

December 20th 06, 03:00 PM
dgk wrote:
> The other day there was a cat in the bushes outside my house when I
> walked past. He (I'll assume He so I don't call it an it) didn't run
> away as I expected, just retreated a bit. It was dark but he appeared
> to be a big orange guy. When I looked out a few minutes later, he was
> sitting on the walkway looking back at me. So, I opened up a can of
> something that my cats are too picky to eat (Trader Joe turkey and
> giblets I think) and put half outside for him. A little while later
> the food, and he, were gone.
>
> The next night I put out the other half. I never saw a cat but it was
> soon gone also. The next night I graduated to putting out the whole
> can. That went. There are around three outdoor cats in my neighborhood
> so someone is getting some food out of the deal. Last night I added
> some treats that my cats don't like. It all went.
>
> I'm about to run out of the food that my guys won't eat, so it looks
> like I'll be buying food for the outside kittys from now on. But with
> feeding sort of comes some responsibility.
>
> I have no idea whether these cats belong to anyone or whether they are
> strays or feral.. That first one certainly didn't seem feral. I was
> only a few feet away from him. Someone is apparently marking the area,
> judging by a whiff I've noticed. Not stinky enough to be annoying but
> my boys suspect that I'm being unfaithful. So I guess someone isn't
> fixed.
>
> I suppose I'll keep feeding them and see where it goes. I hadn't
> intended to go the trap, neuter, release route but maybe.

What a nice post to read. I almost regained my faith in humanity.
Almost.
SO MANY people are willing to feed strays. It's not a big deal. What
*is* a big deal, is that hardly anyone assumes responsibility for them
when they start feeding them. That's the way it ought to be. You start
feeding a cat regualarly, and basically it becomes your cat.
I think it's great that you're thinking ahead to neutering them. Good
luck with that.

Sherry

kraut
December 20th 06, 06:26 PM
I started feeding stray and niegnborhood cats the same way.

I started with a couple that I knew were strays and soon was up to 4
strays at one time. Then the nieghborhood cats that supposedly
belonged to people learned that they could get a free meal. I am down
to one stray right now but I suppose before long another stray will
learn that the cafeteria is open. That is usually the way it happens.
I usually go through at least 4 24 can cases of the large cans a
months not to mention the dry.

Over the years I have rehomed several and have had to have a couple
put down due to illness and injuries. The older ones I try to provide
a place where they can get shelter and where I can put their food and
dogs can not get it all. Luckily there are several abandoned houses
they can get shelter in / under for the winter.

I have been doing this for at least 5 years and whenever it looks like
there are no more strays coming another one shows up and I have to
keep doing it.

Good luck to you and I just have a bit of advice. If you or anyone
else does not plan on keeping feeding them do not start and get them
used to it then stop. It is no good for them.


>The other day there was a cat in the bushes outside my house when I
>walked past. He (I'll assume He so I don't call it an it) didn't run
>away as I expected, just retreated a bit. It was dark but he appeared
>to be a big orange guy. When I looked out a few minutes later, he was
>sitting on the walkway looking back at me. So, I opened up a can of
>something that my cats are too picky to eat (Trader Joe turkey and
>giblets I think) and put half outside for him. A little while later
>the food, and he, were gone.
>
>The next night I put out the other half. I never saw a cat but it was
>soon gone also. The next night I graduated to putting out the whole
>can. That went. There are around three outdoor cats in my neighborhood
>so someone is getting some food out of the deal. Last night I added
>some treats that my cats don't like. It all went.
>
>I'm about to run out of the food that my guys won't eat, so it looks
>like I'll be buying food for the outside kittys from now on. But with
>feeding sort of comes some responsibility.
>
>I have no idea whether these cats belong to anyone or whether they are
>strays or feral.. That first one certainly didn't seem feral. I was
>only a few feet away from him. Someone is apparently marking the area,
>judging by a whiff I've noticed. Not stinky enough to be annoying but
>my boys suspect that I'm being unfaithful. So I guess someone isn't
>fixed.
>
>I suppose I'll keep feeding them and see where it goes. I hadn't
>intended to go the trap, neuter, release route but maybe.

Wendy
December 20th 06, 10:35 PM
"dgk" > wrote in message
...
> The other day there was a cat in the bushes outside my house when I
> walked past. He (I'll assume He so I don't call it an it) didn't run
> away as I expected, just retreated a bit. It was dark but he appeared
> to be a big orange guy. When I looked out a few minutes later, he was
> sitting on the walkway looking back at me. So, I opened up a can of
> something that my cats are too picky to eat (Trader Joe turkey and
> giblets I think) and put half outside for him. A little while later
> the food, and he, were gone.
>
> The next night I put out the other half. I never saw a cat but it was
> soon gone also. The next night I graduated to putting out the whole
> can. That went. There are around three outdoor cats in my neighborhood
> so someone is getting some food out of the deal. Last night I added
> some treats that my cats don't like. It all went.
>
> I'm about to run out of the food that my guys won't eat, so it looks
> like I'll be buying food for the outside kittys from now on. But with
> feeding sort of comes some responsibility.
>
> I have no idea whether these cats belong to anyone or whether they are
> strays or feral.. That first one certainly didn't seem feral. I was
> only a few feet away from him. Someone is apparently marking the area,
> judging by a whiff I've noticed. Not stinky enough to be annoying but
> my boys suspect that I'm being unfaithful. So I guess someone isn't
> fixed.
>
> I suppose I'll keep feeding them and see where it goes. I hadn't
> intended to go the trap, neuter, release route but maybe.

You can do a web search for low cost spay / neuter. There are resources out
there to help financially with neutering stray/feral cats. Please do it.

W

sheelagh
December 21st 06, 12:55 PM
> You can do a web search for low cost spay / neuter. There are resources out
> there to help financially with neutering stray/feral cats. Please do it.
>
> W
This is also the case in uk too.If you take a stray cat to them that
you are feeding,they are more than happy to issue with vouchers to take
to your vet who will perform it for either half of the cost,or,in some
cases 100% of the cost,depending on your circumstances.(cat protection
league)
I think it is wonderful that you are feeding them,but do think on the
neutering issue so that you can stop 52 cats coming to dinner next
year.Do not take this as a chastisment in any way at all-I am talking
from personal experience here.
I feed around 15-20 cats most of the time,unless I manage to home a few
of them of course...but it is true, once you feed them,they believe
that they belong to you & will all come back to you (or vice versa
lol:o).But the more we can do to stop this terrible predicament, the
betteroff your guys will be,I assure you!!
Good Luck, & it would be great to hear that you have done them.Please
let us know how you get on?(If you are in the usa,I believe thart you
have something called the humane society????Try them,I am sure that
they will be pleased that you brought these cats to them & will help
you ourt if they can,ok?
S.
S.

kraut
December 21st 06, 01:58 PM
>> You can do a web search for low cost spay / neuter. There are resources out
>> there to help financially with neutering stray/feral cats. Please do it.
>>

>This is also the case in uk too.If you take a stray cat to them that
>you are feeding,they are more than happy to issue with vouchers to take
>to your vet who will perform it for either half of the cost,or,in some
>cases 100% of the cost,depending on your circumstances.(cat protection
>league)
>I think it is wonderful that you are feeding them,but do think on the
>neutering issue so that you can stop 52 cats coming to dinner next
>year.Do not take this as a chastisment in any way at all-I am talking
>from personal experience here.
>I feed around 15-20 cats most of the time,unless I manage to home a few
>of them of course...but it is true, once you feed them,they believe
>that they belong to you & will all come back to you (or vice versa
>lol:o).But the more we can do to stop this terrible predicament, the
>betteroff your guys will be,I assure you!!
>Good Luck, & it would be great to hear that you have done them.Please
>let us know how you get on?(If you are in the usa,I believe thart you
>have something called the humane society????Try them,I am sure that
>they will be pleased that you brought these cats to them & will help
>you ourt if they can,ok?
>

Here the local Michigan Humane Society will issue a voucher for a free
spay / neuter that you take to you vet. Any extra meds for at homw or
such the owner has to cover if they want them.

dgk
December 21st 06, 06:12 PM
On 20 Dec 2006 07:00:52 -0800, wrote:

>
>dgk wrote:
>> The other day there was a cat in the bushes outside my house when I
>> walked past. He (I'll assume He so I don't call it an it) didn't run
>> away as I expected, just retreated a bit. It was dark but he appeared
>> to be a big orange guy. When I looked out a few minutes later, he was
>> sitting on the walkway looking back at me. So, I opened up a can of
>> something that my cats are too picky to eat (Trader Joe turkey and
>> giblets I think) and put half outside for him. A little while later
>> the food, and he, were gone.
>>
>> The next night I put out the other half. I never saw a cat but it was
>> soon gone also. The next night I graduated to putting out the whole
>> can. That went. There are around three outdoor cats in my neighborhood
>> so someone is getting some food out of the deal. Last night I added
>> some treats that my cats don't like. It all went.
>>
>> I'm about to run out of the food that my guys won't eat, so it looks
>> like I'll be buying food for the outside kittys from now on. But with
>> feeding sort of comes some responsibility.
>>
>> I have no idea whether these cats belong to anyone or whether they are
>> strays or feral.. That first one certainly didn't seem feral. I was
>> only a few feet away from him. Someone is apparently marking the area,
>> judging by a whiff I've noticed. Not stinky enough to be annoying but
>> my boys suspect that I'm being unfaithful. So I guess someone isn't
>> fixed.
>>
>> I suppose I'll keep feeding them and see where it goes. I hadn't
>> intended to go the trap, neuter, release route but maybe.
>
>What a nice post to read. I almost regained my faith in humanity.
>Almost.
>SO MANY people are willing to feed strays. It's not a big deal. What
>*is* a big deal, is that hardly anyone assumes responsibility for them
>when they start feeding them. That's the way it ought to be. You start
>feeding a cat regualarly, and basically it becomes your cat.
>I think it's great that you're thinking ahead to neutering them. Good
>luck with that.
>
>Sherry

Thanks to all who have written. I think I could talk my vet into doing
some cheap fixes, but the problem is how to catch them. My actual
amount of land out front is very small, and I don't feed any in the
back because it's fenced in so my cats don't get out.

Physically, I'd have to put a trap pretty much in the open, and there
are a large number of pedestrians sometimes. The area under the bush
where I put the food is not large. Maybe large enough for a trap
though.

They only seem to be around at night so I'd have to trap one and take
care of it in the morning. The poor thing would be going crazy all
night though. Plus, I can really only do it on the weekends since I go
to work early. I'll see where I can get a trap.

Gail Futoran
December 21st 06, 09:11 PM
"dgk" > wrote in message
...
[snip]
> They only seem to be around at night so I'd have to trap one and take
> care of it in the morning. The poor thing would be going crazy all
> night though. Plus, I can really only do it on the weekends since I go
> to work early. I'll see where I can get a trap.

FWIW when I trapped a neighborhood stray last
December, it was around 5 PM and I left her in
the carrier all night (inside the house, so she was
warm) and took her to the vet first thing next
morning (7:30 AM). I had put cardboard and
shredded newspaper in the bottom of the
carrier. That showed use when I got her back
the next afternoon.

She was fine. If you can keep the cat safe
in the trap - from other animals, humans,
weather, etc. - I don't think it would be a
major problem to have it confined overnight.

My stray was quite healthy before (and after)
I trapped her, though, so that could make a
difference.

Gail F.

dgk
December 21st 06, 09:31 PM
On Thu, 21 Dec 2006 13:58:07 GMT, kraut
> wrote:

>
>
>>> You can do a web search for low cost spay / neuter. There are resources out
>>> there to help financially with neutering stray/feral cats. Please do it.
>>>
>
>>This is also the case in uk too.If you take a stray cat to them that
>>you are feeding,they are more than happy to issue with vouchers to take
>>to your vet who will perform it for either half of the cost,or,in some
>>cases 100% of the cost,depending on your circumstances.(cat protection
>>league)
>>I think it is wonderful that you are feeding them,but do think on the
>>neutering issue so that you can stop 52 cats coming to dinner next
>>year.Do not take this as a chastisment in any way at all-I am talking
>>from personal experience here.
>>I feed around 15-20 cats most of the time,unless I manage to home a few
>>of them of course...but it is true, once you feed them,they believe
>>that they belong to you & will all come back to you (or vice versa
>>lol:o).But the more we can do to stop this terrible predicament, the
>>betteroff your guys will be,I assure you!!
>>Good Luck, & it would be great to hear that you have done them.Please
>>let us know how you get on?(If you are in the usa,I believe thart you
>>have something called the humane society????Try them,I am sure that
>>they will be pleased that you brought these cats to them & will help
>>you ourt if they can,ok?
>>
>
>Here the local Michigan Humane Society will issue a voucher for a free
>spay / neuter that you take to you vet. Any extra meds for at homw or
>such the owner has to cover if they want them.
>

I spoke to the ASPCA. They gave me the number for a local chapter of
Neighborhood Cats (www.neighborhoodcats.com) that gives a one day
course in TNR. I didn't realize that it was so complicated. Anyway,
once I complete the course, I can borrow traps from the ASPCA.

Apparently I get the traps a few days before the ASPCA truck is
scheduled to visit my area, and whatever cats I trap, I keep inside,
in the trap, until the big day. After the surgery, I keep then another
few days and then release them. I read that talking to them does not
calm down truly feral cats; the best thing to do is just keep a cover
over the cage and leave them alone. I don't know if these cats are
feral or just strays. Or even someone's pet.

Doesn't sound too horrible but it needs planning. And I really can't
figure where I'll put the traps. I may need to enlist the help of a
neighbor. She is very old and sick, and doesn't get out of the house
much. But she has a deck in her backyard, only about a half-foot off
the ground, and I've seen cats go under there. As well as an oppossum.
If I can get the traps set up in her yard, then this might work out.

Lynne
December 21st 06, 10:46 PM
on Thu, 21 Dec 2006 21:31:57 GMT, dgk > wrote:

> I spoke to the ASPCA. They gave me the number for a local chapter of
> Neighborhood Cats (www.neighborhoodcats.com) that gives a one day
> course in TNR. I didn't realize that it was so complicated. Anyway,
> once I complete the course, I can borrow traps from the ASPCA.

Fantastic! What a wonderful thing you are doing!! The idea of asking your
neighbor if you can set the traps in her yard sounds like a good plan.

--
Lynne

http://picasaweb.google.com/what.the.hell.is.it/

Cheryl
December 22nd 06, 01:34 AM
On Thu 21 Dec 2006 01:12:40p, dgk wrote in
rec.pets.cats.health+behav
>:

> They only seem to be around at night so I'd have to trap one and
> take care of it in the morning. The poor thing would be going
> crazy all night though. Plus, I can really only do it on the
> weekends since I go to work early. I'll see where I can get a
> trap.

I've done this several times and as long as you can bring the trap
indoors, or in a garage where it's not freezing, and cover it so they
can't see out, they'll be fine. Chances are that after it realizes
it isn't getting out, it will just crouch without moving. Seems cruel
to us, but it really isn't. Plus, if you're taking them to the vet
for surgery the next day, this way you'll know that no food had been
eaten.

Good luck, and you're doing a really good thing.

--
Cheryl

Phil P.
December 22nd 06, 10:02 AM
"dgk" > wrote in message
...
> On Thu, 21 Dec 2006 13:58:07 GMT, kraut
> > wrote:

> I spoke to the ASPCA. They gave me the number for a local chapter of
> Neighborhood Cats (www.neighborhoodcats.com) that gives a one day
> course in TNR. I didn't realize that it was so complicated. Anyway,
> once I complete the course, I can borrow traps from the ASPCA.

That's really a good idea for 2 reasons- you learn how to set and use the
trap correctly so you don't hurt the cats or yourself, and 2; it protects
the org. If they just handled you the trap without making sure you know how
to use it, you could sue the org.if you got hurt.


>
> Apparently I get the traps a few days before the ASPCA truck is
> scheduled to visit my area, and whatever cats I trap, I keep inside,
> in the trap, until the big day. After the surgery, I keep then another
> few days and then release them. I read that talking to them does not
> calm down truly feral cats; the best thing to do is just keep a cover
> over the cage and leave them alone.

That's right. Don't bother them- you'll only be adding to their anxiety. If
they don't know you, they'll see you as a big predator.


I don't know if these cats are
> feral or just strays. Or even someone's pet.

Hard to tell sometimes if you don't know the cats. Even strays and pet cats
can be fearful of strangers. If they're already neutered, there's a good
chance they're someone's pet. But play it safe and assume they're feral.
You'll get to know which cats are friendly after you've been feeding them
for awhile. Just remember, some ferals will come up to you and even rub
against you after you've been feeding them for awhile, so don't
automatically think they're pets and try to pick them up.


>
> Doesn't sound too horrible but it needs planning. And I really can't
> figure where I'll put the traps.


Start feeding them everyday at the same time in a particular spot where you
want to put the trap. Try to pick a quiet spot. After they're used to being
fed at the spot, set the trap there. A drop trap works better than a live
trap.


I may need to enlist the help of a
> neighbor. She is very old and sick, and doesn't get out of the house
> much. But she has a deck in her backyard, only about a half-foot off
> the ground, and I've seen cats go under there. As well as an oppossum.
> If I can get the traps set up in her yard, then this might work out.

If the cats go under her deck, start feeding them a few feet away. If you
use a drop trap, you'll get the cats and not the opossum.

Phil

Phil P.
December 22nd 06, 10:02 AM
"dgk" > wrote in message
...
> On 20 Dec 2006 07:00:52 -0800, wrote:

> Thanks to all who have written. I think I could talk my vet into doing
> some cheap fixes, but the problem is how to catch them. My actual
> amount of land out front is very small, and I don't feed any in the
> back because it's fenced in so my cats don't get out.
>
> Physically, I'd have to put a trap pretty much in the open, and there
> are a large number of pedestrians sometimes. The area under the bush
> where I put the food is not large. Maybe large enough for a trap
> though.
>
> They only seem to be around at night so I'd have to trap one and take
> care of it in the morning. The poor thing would be going crazy all
> night though. Plus, I can really only do it on the weekends since I go
> to work early. I'll see where I can get a trap.

In your situation, since you know when the cats show up, you might want to
use a drop trap. Since you'll be trapping on your own property, you can run
the trip line through a window and trip the trap from inside. Trapping cats
with a drop trap is much easier and much faster than using a livetrap. An
additional advantage of the drop trap is you can trap only the cat(s) that
you want. Transferring the cat to a carrier or cage is also easy. A drop
trap also makes a great recovery cage with plenty of room for food/water and
a litter box.

You can make a decent 3' x3' drop trap in a few hours for about $50.

http://maxshouse.com/Feral/droptrap-d.jpg

or a folding trap for a few bucks more:

http://maxshouse.com/Feral/maxtrap-front-02.jpg

http://maxshouse.com/Feral/maxtrap-folded.jpg

Phil

dgk
December 22nd 06, 03:01 PM
On Fri, 22 Dec 2006 10:02:33 GMT, "Phil P." >
wrote:

>
>"dgk" > wrote in message
...
>> On Thu, 21 Dec 2006 13:58:07 GMT, kraut
>> > wrote:
>
>> I spoke to the ASPCA. They gave me the number for a local chapter of
>> Neighborhood Cats (www.neighborhoodcats.com) that gives a one day
>> course in TNR. I didn't realize that it was so complicated. Anyway,
>> once I complete the course, I can borrow traps from the ASPCA.
>
>That's really a good idea for 2 reasons- you learn how to set and use the
>trap correctly so you don't hurt the cats or yourself, and 2; it protects
>the org. If they just handled you the trap without making sure you know how
>to use it, you could sue the org.if you got hurt.
>
>
>>
>> Apparently I get the traps a few days before the ASPCA truck is
>> scheduled to visit my area, and whatever cats I trap, I keep inside,
>> in the trap, until the big day. After the surgery, I keep then another
>> few days and then release them. I read that talking to them does not
>> calm down truly feral cats; the best thing to do is just keep a cover
>> over the cage and leave them alone.
>
>That's right. Don't bother them- you'll only be adding to their anxiety. If
>they don't know you, they'll see you as a big predator.
>
>
>I don't know if these cats are
>> feral or just strays. Or even someone's pet.
>
>Hard to tell sometimes if you don't know the cats. Even strays and pet cats
>can be fearful of strangers. If they're already neutered, there's a good
>chance they're someone's pet. But play it safe and assume they're feral.
>You'll get to know which cats are friendly after you've been feeding them
>for awhile. Just remember, some ferals will come up to you and even rub
>against you after you've been feeding them for awhile, so don't
>automatically think they're pets and try to pick them up.
>
>
>>
>> Doesn't sound too horrible but it needs planning. And I really can't
>> figure where I'll put the traps.
>
>
>Start feeding them everyday at the same time in a particular spot where you
>want to put the trap. Try to pick a quiet spot. After they're used to being
>fed at the spot, set the trap there. A drop trap works better than a live
>trap.
>
>
>I may need to enlist the help of a
>> neighbor. She is very old and sick, and doesn't get out of the house
>> much. But she has a deck in her backyard, only about a half-foot off
>> the ground, and I've seen cats go under there. As well as an oppossum.
>> If I can get the traps set up in her yard, then this might work out.
>
>If the cats go under her deck, start feeding them a few feet away. If you
>use a drop trap, you'll get the cats and not the opossum.
>
>Phil
>

It isn't like a colony though. This isn't an open area. The
neighborhood is mostly attached houses (rowhouses) so there isn't any
way for an animal to get from the front to the back without going
around the block. The front is a series of driveways and small
walkways leading to the doors, and each walkway is lined by maybe a
two foot wide planting area. The cats that I see in the front
generally slink from two foot strip to two foot strip. And there
aren't many of them.

But something sure eats the food. Mostly it isn't eaten when I'm
awake, but it is gone in the morning. One problem is that the place
that I'm feeding them is really not a good place for a trap, because
I'm putting the food under a bush which makes it somewhat sheltered.

Oh well, there is a civic association meeting scheduled for the middle
of January. I'll see if I can interest a few neighbors in a TNR
program. Maybe I can find out if anyone owns these cats, but I think
not.