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December 21st 06, 04:30 AM
I just got 2 new cats. One has been hiding in the closet since Sunday
night. I now have her litter box and food and water in there but it's
all untouched.
How worried should I be? Should I close the closet door so that it
feels totally safe for a while?

Lynne
December 21st 06, 04:36 AM
on Thu, 21 Dec 2006 03:30:07 GMT, wrote:

> I just got 2 new cats. One has been hiding in the closet since Sunday
> night. I now have her litter box and food and water in there but it's
> all untouched.
> How worried should I be? Should I close the closet door so that it
> feels totally safe for a while?

You should be very worried. Please take the cat who is not eating,
drinking or urinating to the vet right away.

--
Lynne

http://picasaweb.google.com/what.the.hell.is.it/

December 21st 06, 05:04 AM
Lynne wrote:
> on Thu, 21 Dec 2006 03:30:07 GMT, wrote:
>
> > I just got 2 new cats. One has been hiding in the closet since Sunday
> > night. I now have her litter box and food and water in there but it's
> > all untouched.
> > How worried should I be? Should I close the closet door so that it
> > feels totally safe for a while?
>
> You should be very worried. Please take the cat who is not eating,
> drinking or urinating to the vet right away.
>
> --
> Lynne
>
> http://picasaweb.google.com/what.the.hell.is.it/

Seriously? Wow. I know that she's afraid of the other cat. She's
afraid of everything pretty much.

mark
December 21st 06, 08:17 AM
Where did you get these cats? Are they from the same litter? How is the
other cat's attitude towards her? You may have to take back the shy
one if she continues this behaviour. Have you tried bringing her into
the living room and sitting with her while continuing to pet and
reassure her that everything will be alright? My cat was shy when I got
it home but it gradually got accustomed to it's new surroundings and
eventually felt right at home with my other cat. I wouldn't let her
stay in the closet in fact I would keep the door closed. Make sure to
give her special attention to ease her nerves. You can try emailing the
NPR radio show called 'Calling All Pets' with Patricia McConnell. The
address is and the phone number is 800-462-7413.
Mark


wrote:
> I just got 2 new cats. One has been hiding in the closet since Sunday
> night. I now have her litter box and food and water in there but it's
> all untouched.
> How worried should I be? Should I close the closet door so that it
> feels totally safe for a while?

IBen Getiner
December 21st 06, 09:11 AM
wrote:
> I just got 2 new cats.

I only got two as well.....

> One has been hiding in the closet since Sunday
> night.

What happened prior to this hiding episode? Usually, this comes after
some kind of fearful occurrence. That is what the primarily concern
should be now. About what we should do in regards to removing it from
kitty's life.

> I now have her litter box and food and water in there but it's
> all untouched.

You bet. She's probably trying to do the feline equivalent of
committing suicide.

> How worried should I be? Should I close the closet door so that it
> feels totally safe for a while?

Remove whatever it was that frightened her. Then give her some time. Be
sure to check to make sure she is not getting dehydrated, though. I
always used the rule of thumb where you grab the animal loosely by the
skin of the back and gently twist it and then let go. If it pops back
into shape, the animal is not dehydrated badly. It it slowly attempts
to return to normal, like it was made of salt-water taffy, then your
cat is in trouble. Maybe someone else can confirm the legitimacy of
this technique?
What happened to frighten her so?


IBen Getiner

December 21st 06, 09:17 AM
IBen Getiner wrote:
> wrote:
> > I just got 2 new cats.
>
> I only got two as well.....
>
> > One has been hiding in the closet since Sunday
> > night.
>
> What happened prior to this hiding episode? Usually, this comes after
> some kind of fearful occurrence. That is what the primarily concern
> should be now. About what we should do in regards to removing it from
> kitty's life.
>
> > I now have her litter box and food and water in there but it's
> > all untouched.
>
> You bet. She's probably trying to do the feline equivalent of
> committing suicide.
>
> > How worried should I be? Should I close the closet door so that it
> > feels totally safe for a while?
>
> Remove whatever it was that frightened her. Then give her some time. Be
> sure to check to make sure she is not getting dehydrated, though. I
> always used the rule of thumb where you grab the animal loosely by the
> skin of the back and gently twist it and then let go. If it pops back
> into shape, the animal is not dehydrated badly. It it slowly attempts
> to return to normal, like it was made of salt-water taffy, then your
> cat is in trouble. Maybe someone else can confirm the legitimacy of
> this technique?
> What happened to frighten her so?
>
>
> IBen Getiner

The two cats were living happily together (the one always being a
hider-I don't know her early life history at all) for over a year and a
half. They are both about 2 and not from the same litter.
I brought the more animated one over here to my apartment first and it
was great. Then I brought her buddy over just an hour later and the
first one was already completely territorial over the
apartment....hissing and growling at the scared one.
I talked to the previous owner and he said she use to hide all the time
but that at night she will sneak out and get food, etc.
It's exhausting trying to figure out what I am doing wrong/right etc.
I do pull her out from under the chest where she hides and sit with her
and talk to her and give her lots of love out here in the living area.
I just hope she's actually drinking water and eating when I don't
notice it.

IBen Getiner
December 21st 06, 10:14 AM
wrote:
> IBen Getiner wrote:
> > wrote:
> > > I just got 2 new cats.
> >
> > I only got two as well.....
> >
> > > One has been hiding in the closet since Sunday
> > > night.
> >
> > What happened prior to this hiding episode? Usually, this comes after
> > some kind of fearful occurrence. That is what the primarily concern
> > should be now. About what we should do in regards to removing it from
> > kitty's life.
> >
> > > I now have her litter box and food and water in there but it's
> > > all untouched.
> >
> > You bet. She's probably trying to do the feline equivalent of
> > committing suicide.
> >
> > > How worried should I be? Should I close the closet door so that it
> > > feels totally safe for a while?
> >
> > Remove whatever it was that frightened her. Then give her some time. Be
> > sure to check to make sure she is not getting dehydrated, though. I
> > always used the rule of thumb where you grab the animal loosely by the
> > skin of the back and gently twist it and then let go. If it pops back
> > into shape, the animal is not dehydrated badly. It it slowly attempts
> > to return to normal, like it was made of salt-water taffy, then your
> > cat is in trouble. Maybe someone else can confirm the legitimacy of
> > this technique?
> > What happened to frighten her so?
> >
> >
> > IBen Getiner
>
> The two cats were living happily together (the one always being a
> hider-I don't know her early life history at all) for over a year and a
> half. They are both about 2 and not from the same litter.
> I brought the more animated one over here to my apartment first and it
> was great. Then I brought her buddy over just an hour later and the
> first one was already completely territorial over the
> apartment....hissing and growling at the scared one.
> I talked to the previous owner and he said she use to hide all the time
> but that at night she will sneak out and get food, etc.
> It's exhausting trying to figure out what I am doing wrong/right etc.
> I do pull her out from under the chest where she hides and sit with her
> and talk to her and give her lots of love out here in the living area.
> I just hope she's actually drinking water and eating when I don't
> notice it.

I see... Perhaps you need to confine the more aggressive one to another
room. Or better yet... chastise the aggressive one in front of the
passive one. So she will see what happens to aggressors, and that there
will be a price to be paid for such future behavior. Then they will
both be in hiding and she will not feel so all alone! Another thing you
could do is to allow her special privileges. Let her sleep with you in
your closed bedroom, so she can relax without the constant fear of her
detractor's presence. Don't force her to come out. She will do so in
her own good time. It is quite obvious that she greatly fears the one
who considers her to be hiz territorial rival. She is not one, of
course. But the other does not know this, and will most likely continue
his pattern of tyranny that he has found to be so effective. At least
until he becomes used to this new abode himself, but of course by then,
it may be too late. The problem is, the fearful cat is so very much
afraid of the anger of the other that it will not even come out to eat
and drink. This is what I think. If this is actually the case, one
might try placing the good cat's food and water in a place where IT
feels safe. A place that is off-limits to the fear-inspiring other.
Despite all of the psychological prosing that one can get caught up in,
It is very important to be sure that she is not becoming dehydrated.
Take special care in gauging exactly how much water, food etc. that you
place as an offering vs. how much is left there in the morning. If your
cat is showing signs of dehydration, you should seek professional help
for her immediately. I'm not a professional or anything. It just seemz
like a common sense thing to do to me..


IBen Getiner

December 21st 06, 10:14 AM
IBen Getiner wrote:
> wrote:
> > I just got 2 new cats.
>
> I only got two as well.....
>
> > One has been hiding in the closet since Sunday
> > night.
>
> What happened prior to this hiding episode? Usually, this comes after
> some kind of fearful occurrence. That is what the primarily concern
> should be now. About what we should do in regards to removing it from
> kitty's life.
>
> > I now have her litter box and food and water in there but it's
> > all untouched.
>
> You bet. She's probably trying to do the feline equivalent of
> committing suicide.
>
> > How worried should I be? Should I close the closet door so that it
> > feels totally safe for a while?
>
> Remove whatever it was that frightened her. Then give her some time. Be
> sure to check to make sure she is not getting dehydrated, though. I
> always used the rule of thumb where you grab the animal loosely by the
> skin of the back and gently twist it and then let go. If it pops back
> into shape, the animal is not dehydrated badly. It it slowly attempts
> to return to normal, like it was made of salt-water taffy, then your
> cat is in trouble. Maybe someone else can confirm the legitimacy of
> this technique?
> What happened to frighten her so?
>
>
> IBen Getiner

FELINE SUICIDE? Would you care to elaborate on this? PLEASE.

IBen Getiner
December 21st 06, 10:41 AM
wrote:
> IBen Getiner wrote:
> > wrote:
> > > I just got 2 new cats.
> >
> > I only got two as well.....
> >
> > > One has been hiding in the closet since Sunday
> > > night.
> >
> > What happened prior to this hiding episode? Usually, this comes after
> > some kind of fearful occurrence. That is what the primarily concern
> > should be now. About what we should do in regards to removing it from
> > kitty's life.
> >
> > > I now have her litter box and food and water in there but it's
> > > all untouched.
> >
> > You bet. She's probably trying to do the feline equivalent of
> > committing suicide.
> >
> > > How worried should I be? Should I close the closet door so that it
> > > feels totally safe for a while?
> >
> > Remove whatever it was that frightened her. Then give her some time. Be
> > sure to check to make sure she is not getting dehydrated, though. I
> > always used the rule of thumb where you grab the animal loosely by the
> > skin of the back and gently twist it and then let go. If it pops back
> > into shape, the animal is not dehydrated badly. It it slowly attempts
> > to return to normal, like it was made of salt-water taffy, then your
> > cat is in trouble. Maybe someone else can confirm the legitimacy of
> > this technique?
> > What happened to frighten her so?
> >
> >
> > IBen Getiner
>
> FELINE SUICIDE? Would you care to elaborate on this? PLEASE.

I am sorry to frighten you so by the use of such a harsh world used in
such looseness. What I am driving at is... the cat sounds to me like
it's shutting down. But in all reality, it is not intentional and iz
probably just the fact that she is afraid to come forth and partake of
food or drink for fear of the other. You can see this in every aspect
of the animal kingdom. The passive ones will hide, and the aggressive
ones will prowl and dominate. I have actually seen instances (with
other species) where the aggressor will attact the passive one
relentlessly simply because the passive one tried to come out to eat. I
know your situation is not that dire, but I use it to make a point. I
hope this clears this up for you...
Also, on the subject of dehydration, when I was a lad, my family had
an outside cat that somehow got into poison. It disappeared for about a
week. We looked and looked, but it was nowhere to be found. Then we
found it under the shed all curled up in a niche. It growled at me,
even though it was technically 'my' cat and I knew it loved me. I
realized that it just wanted to be left alone. We told our vet and he
said that we just had to wait it out. That it might make it or it might
die. Finally, it came out. We rushed it to the vet, and that's where I
learned about the 'twist the skin' technique for checking for
dehydration. The vet showed us by doing this that the cat was indeed
very dehydrated. That skin practically stayed in the exact shape it was
in when the vet twisted it and then let go. He hydrated the cat and
kept it for a couple of days and everything was fine.
Forget the suicide thing. I did not mean that literally. Beware of
dehydration. I mean that literally and this is all I dare say on the
matter. Good luck....


IBen Getiner

December 21st 06, 10:49 AM
IBen Getiner wrote:
> wrote:
> > IBen Getiner wrote:
> > > wrote:
> > > > I just got 2 new cats.
> > >
> > > I only got two as well.....
> > >
> > > > One has been hiding in the closet since Sunday
> > > > night.
> > >
> > > What happened prior to this hiding episode? Usually, this comes after
> > > some kind of fearful occurrence. That is what the primarily concern
> > > should be now. About what we should do in regards to removing it from
> > > kitty's life.
> > >
> > > > I now have her litter box and food and water in there but it's
> > > > all untouched.
> > >
> > > You bet. She's probably trying to do the feline equivalent of
> > > committing suicide.
> > >
> > > > How worried should I be? Should I close the closet door so that it
> > > > feels totally safe for a while?
> > >
> > > Remove whatever it was that frightened her. Then give her some time. Be
> > > sure to check to make sure she is not getting dehydrated, though. I
> > > always used the rule of thumb where you grab the animal loosely by the
> > > skin of the back and gently twist it and then let go. If it pops back
> > > into shape, the animal is not dehydrated badly. It it slowly attempts
> > > to return to normal, like it was made of salt-water taffy, then your
> > > cat is in trouble. Maybe someone else can confirm the legitimacy of
> > > this technique?
> > > What happened to frighten her so?
> > >
> > >
> > > IBen Getiner
> >
> > FELINE SUICIDE? Would you care to elaborate on this? PLEASE.
>
> I am sorry to frighten you so by the use of such a harsh world used in
> such looseness. What I am driving at is... the cat sounds to me like
> it's shutting down. But in all reality, it is not intentional and iz
> probably just the fact that she is afraid to come forth and partake of
> food or drink for fear of the other. You can see this in every aspect
> of the animal kingdom. The passive ones will hide, and the aggressive
> ones will prowl and dominate. I have actually seen instances (with
> other species) where the aggressor will attact the passive one
> relentlessly simply because the passive one tried to come out to eat. I
> know your situation is not that dire, but I use it to make a point. I
> hope this clears this up for you...
> Also, on the subject of dehydration, when I was a lad, my family had
> an outside cat that somehow got into poison. It disappeared for about a
> week. We looked and looked, but it was nowhere to be found. Then we
> found it under the shed all curled up in a niche. It growled at me,
> even though it was technically 'my' cat and I knew it loved me. I
> realized that it just wanted to be left alone. We told our vet and he
> said that we just had to wait it out. That it might make it or it might
> die. Finally, it came out. We rushed it to the vet, and that's where I
> learned about the 'twist the skin' technique for checking for
> dehydration. The vet showed us by doing this that the cat was indeed
> very dehydrated. That skin practically stayed in the exact shape it was
> in when the vet twisted it and then let go. He hydrated the cat and
> kept it for a couple of days and everything was fine.
> Forget the suicide thing. I did not mean that literally. Beware of
> dehydration. I mean that literally and this is all I dare say on the
> matter. Good luck....
>
>
> IBen Getiner

Thank you Ben. I have put her in the closet with everything she needs
and I just go in there to pet her. I am shutting the door so she won't
feel threatened by the other cat....

Lynne
December 21st 06, 01:57 PM
on Thu, 21 Dec 2006 04:04:26 GMT, wrote:

> Seriously?

unless you are mistaken or exaggerating and the cat is really eating,
drinking and urinating/defacating, then yes, get it to the vet. Cats
cannot go without eating or drinking without serious health consequences.

--
Lynne

http://picasaweb.google.com/what.the.hell.is.it/

dgk
December 21st 06, 07:19 PM
On 21 Dec 2006 01:49:35 -0800, wrote:

>
>IBen Getiner wrote:
>> wrote:
>> > IBen Getiner wrote:
>> > > wrote:
>> > > > I just got 2 new cats.
>> > >
>> > > I only got two as well.....
>> > >
>> > > > One has been hiding in the closet since Sunday
>> > > > night.
>> > >
>> > > What happened prior to this hiding episode? Usually, this comes after
>> > > some kind of fearful occurrence. That is what the primarily concern
>> > > should be now. About what we should do in regards to removing it from
>> > > kitty's life.
>> > >
>> > > > I now have her litter box and food and water in there but it's
>> > > > all untouched.
>> > >
>> > > You bet. She's probably trying to do the feline equivalent of
>> > > committing suicide.
>> > >
>> > > > How worried should I be? Should I close the closet door so that it
>> > > > feels totally safe for a while?
>> > >
>> > > Remove whatever it was that frightened her. Then give her some time. Be
>> > > sure to check to make sure she is not getting dehydrated, though. I
>> > > always used the rule of thumb where you grab the animal loosely by the
>> > > skin of the back and gently twist it and then let go. If it pops back
>> > > into shape, the animal is not dehydrated badly. It it slowly attempts
>> > > to return to normal, like it was made of salt-water taffy, then your
>> > > cat is in trouble. Maybe someone else can confirm the legitimacy of
>> > > this technique?
>> > > What happened to frighten her so?
>> > >
>> > >
>> > > IBen Getiner
>> >
>> > FELINE SUICIDE? Would you care to elaborate on this? PLEASE.
>>
>> I am sorry to frighten you so by the use of such a harsh world used in
>> such looseness. What I am driving at is... the cat sounds to me like
>> it's shutting down. But in all reality, it is not intentional and iz
>> probably just the fact that she is afraid to come forth and partake of
>> food or drink for fear of the other. You can see this in every aspect
>> of the animal kingdom. The passive ones will hide, and the aggressive
>> ones will prowl and dominate. I have actually seen instances (with
>> other species) where the aggressor will attact the passive one
>> relentlessly simply because the passive one tried to come out to eat. I
>> know your situation is not that dire, but I use it to make a point. I
>> hope this clears this up for you...
>> Also, on the subject of dehydration, when I was a lad, my family had
>> an outside cat that somehow got into poison. It disappeared for about a
>> week. We looked and looked, but it was nowhere to be found. Then we
>> found it under the shed all curled up in a niche. It growled at me,
>> even though it was technically 'my' cat and I knew it loved me. I
>> realized that it just wanted to be left alone. We told our vet and he
>> said that we just had to wait it out. That it might make it or it might
>> die. Finally, it came out. We rushed it to the vet, and that's where I
>> learned about the 'twist the skin' technique for checking for
>> dehydration. The vet showed us by doing this that the cat was indeed
>> very dehydrated. That skin practically stayed in the exact shape it was
>> in when the vet twisted it and then let go. He hydrated the cat and
>> kept it for a couple of days and everything was fine.
>> Forget the suicide thing. I did not mean that literally. Beware of
>> dehydration. I mean that literally and this is all I dare say on the
>> matter. Good luck....
>>
>>
>> IBen Getiner
>
>Thank you Ben. I have put her in the closet with everything she needs
>and I just go in there to pet her. I am shutting the door so she won't
>feel threatened by the other cat....

If she really hasn't eaten in four days then it's pretty much time for
a vet visit. Real soon.

Get a feliway thing if you can (google it) to calm her down. And yes,
keep the door closed for the moment I would think.

dgk
December 21st 06, 10:39 PM
On 21 Dec 2006 00:17:13 -0800, wrote:

>
>IBen Getiner wrote:
>> wrote:
>> > I just got 2 new cats.
>>
>> I only got two as well.....
>>
>> > One has been hiding in the closet since Sunday
>> > night.
>>
>> What happened prior to this hiding episode? Usually, this comes after
>> some kind of fearful occurrence. That is what the primarily concern
>> should be now. About what we should do in regards to removing it from
>> kitty's life.
>>
>> > I now have her litter box and food and water in there but it's
>> > all untouched.
>>
>> You bet. She's probably trying to do the feline equivalent of
>> committing suicide.
>>
>> > How worried should I be? Should I close the closet door so that it
>> > feels totally safe for a while?
>>
>> Remove whatever it was that frightened her. Then give her some time. Be
>> sure to check to make sure she is not getting dehydrated, though. I
>> always used the rule of thumb where you grab the animal loosely by the
>> skin of the back and gently twist it and then let go. If it pops back
>> into shape, the animal is not dehydrated badly. It it slowly attempts
>> to return to normal, like it was made of salt-water taffy, then your
>> cat is in trouble. Maybe someone else can confirm the legitimacy of
>> this technique?
>> What happened to frighten her so?
>>
>>
>> IBen Getiner
>
>The two cats were living happily together (the one always being a
>hider-I don't know her early life history at all) for over a year and a
>half. They are both about 2 and not from the same litter.
>I brought the more animated one over here to my apartment first and it
>was great. Then I brought her buddy over just an hour later and the
>first one was already completely territorial over the
>apartment....hissing and growling at the scared one.
>I talked to the previous owner and he said she use to hide all the time
>but that at night she will sneak out and get food, etc.
>It's exhausting trying to figure out what I am doing wrong/right etc.
>I do pull her out from under the chest where she hides and sit with her
>and talk to her and give her lots of love out here in the living area.
>I just hope she's actually drinking water and eating when I don't
>notice it.

I was just reading about feral cats (see the thread about Now Feeding
Outdoor Cats or something like that) and I'm wondering if the hider is
actually a feral cat. The site (www.neighborhoodcats.com) says that
truly feral cats will never be happy indoors and will spend their time
hiding. Someone posted something like that a few weeks ago, possibly
from the same site.

As I read the part about hiding, I thought of your post and wondered
if that's what is going on.

Lynne
December 21st 06, 11:44 PM
on Thu, 21 Dec 2006 21:39:16 GMT, dgk > wrote:

> As I read the part about hiding, I thought of your post and wondered
> if that's what is going on.

A cat doesn't have to be a feral to behave that way. A cat who wasn't
socialized as a kitten can exhibit the same behaviors. Also, some cats are
just mentally unbalanced, are always fearful, and will never trust humans
(I've know a few torties like that).

There are also varying degrees of this kind of behavior. For example, my
mother adopted a kitten from a rescue who just doesn't like people. She's
not particularly skittish, but she is not friendly. My mother was bumming
because my cats are sooooo friendly and she wanted one like mine. She was
regretting getting her. I told her to be patient, but that if the kitten
never comes around, she is still obligated to accept her as she is and care
for her. So that is what she is doing.

--
Lynne

http://picasaweb.google.com/what.the.hell.is.it/

dgk
December 22nd 06, 03:46 PM
On Thu, 21 Dec 2006 16:44:54 -0600, Lynne
> wrote:

>on Thu, 21 Dec 2006 21:39:16 GMT, dgk > wrote:
>
>> As I read the part about hiding, I thought of your post and wondered
>> if that's what is going on.
>
>A cat doesn't have to be a feral to behave that way. A cat who wasn't
>socialized as a kitten can exhibit the same behaviors. Also, some cats are
>just mentally unbalanced, are always fearful, and will never trust humans
>(I've know a few torties like that).

Actually that's not a bad idea. Not trusting many humans is likely a
good thing. I don't trust them myself.

>There are also varying degrees of this kind of behavior. For example, my
>mother adopted a kitten from a rescue who just doesn't like people. She's
>not particularly skittish, but she is not friendly. My mother was bumming
>because my cats are sooooo friendly and she wanted one like mine. She was
>regretting getting her. I told her to be patient, but that if the kitten
>never comes around, she is still obligated to accept her as she is and care
>for her. So that is what she is doing.

You're right of course. It's likely a matter of degree rather than
just a sharp line. But the import of the acticles is that some cats
might simply be happier not kept in a house even if it is more
dangerous outside. That goes against many of what us US folks think of
as our basic cat beliefs, but may not be as much of a shock to our
British friends.

My Nipsy is an interesting case. He was an outdoor cat for maybe a
year before coming indoors, after he had been attacked and almost
killed. A friend of mine had him fixed up and took him in, and I
eventually got him when he made life miserable for one of their
established cats.

He's just scared of everything in the house, but outside, in the
fenced in backyard, he seems less scared of things. He doesn't like
being somewhere where he can't easily run away. When my doorbell
rings, there is a blur of grey fur, and Nipsy is gone. Espy runs to
the door to see who it is.

Let's face. it. All cats are weird.

December 23rd 06, 08:54 PM
wrote:
> I just got 2 new cats. One has been hiding in the closet since Sunday
> night. I now have her litter box and food and water in there but it's
> all untouched.
> How worried should I be? Should I close the closet door so that it
> feels totally safe for a while?

Any improvement? If the cat has not been eating or drinking all this
time, go to a vet today before everything is closed for the holidays.
If the cat doesn't eat for a few days, this can lead to something
called feline hepatic lipidosis, but all you essentially need to know
is your cat needs to eat and drink. Sometimes it already helps to
rehydrate the cat at the vet, as dehydration by itself will lead to the
cat not wanting to eat. And get some a/d while you're at the vet to
have her rehydrated, it's very palatable and most cats will take to it.
Alternatively you can try offering her babyfood (meatbased, without
onions) once you bring her back home.

Are you offering the cats the food they were used to?

Good luck,

Petra

addicted
December 24th 06, 04:14 PM
wrote:

> How worried should I be? Should I close the closet door so that it
> feels totally safe for a while?

sure.. but maybe just close the bedroom door and leave the closet
cracked

I had the same type of cat, any frustration you might be tempted to
feel should be concealed from the cat

just speak gentle with her, and don't tip toe around her.. this will
come off like stalking.

she'll eat...

nothing wrong with some special food either... a little tuna fish..
you know a treat

addicted
December 24th 06, 04:41 PM
IBen Getiner wrote:

> Remove whatever it was that frightened her. Then give her some time.

mhmmm,

my Lucy was the same way at first.
I remember picking her up (even though she didn't want to be picked up)
and held her... I kept holding her.

I could feel her trembling... the trembling finally left her in small
sobs?.. something like that.

but it did take some time.

I mention holding the cat cause the OP here could also do that.
what cat can resist cuddling.