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Andrew M. Saucci, Jr.
December 29th 06, 03:41 AM
I'm in a difficult situation and was wondering what others would do.
My cat is 14 years old. I took him to a vet about six months ago and he was
diagnosed with a hyperthyroid condition. I was given the usual choice of
Tapazole, radiation, or surgery. We've tried the pills but the cat is still
vomiting three times a day (why we took him in the first place) and getting
thinner and thinner (although he still has healthy bowel movements besides).
The other problem is that he has always been a bit headstrong. The first
time I took him to the vet he must have been very sick and/or unacquainted
with vets because they were actually able to take him out of the carrying
case without a problem. The second time they would not take him out because
he was ready to attack; my mother had to leave him there and he was somehow
sedated while they did the tests. The third time the vet simply would not
examine him and we just got a refill for the Tapazole. My point is not to
beat up on the vet, but it does leave me in a pickle-- I don't even know if
they'll euthanize him unless he's practically three-quarters dead to start.
I already had the sad experience of watching a cat die in my bedroom at 2 AM
and I don't know if I want to go through that again. I'm tempted to try the
radiation but if my vet won't even chance taking him out of the box maybe
the vet who does the radiation won't either. I also hate the thought of
leaving him for a week or even ten days (the figure I was given)-- he loves
me to pieces and probably would think I'd abandoned him. And while I have
plenty of money for my little friend if it will help him I wonder if I'll
just be giving the cat a few extra months of low-quality life for a large
expenditure. Any suggestions?

Andrew

mlbriggs
December 29th 06, 06:36 AM
On Thu, 28 Dec 2006 22:41:19 -0500, Andrew M. Saucci, Jr. wrote:

> I'm in a difficult situation and was wondering what others would do.
> My cat is 14 years old. I took him to a vet about six months ago and he was
> diagnosed with a hyperthyroid condition. I was given the usual choice of
> Tapazole, radiation, or surgery. We've tried the pills but the cat is still
> vomiting three times a day (why we took him in the first place) and getting
> thinner and thinner (although he still has healthy bowel movements besides).
> The other problem is that he has always been a bit headstrong. The first
> time I took him to the vet he must have been very sick and/or unacquainted
> with vets because they were actually able to take him out of the carrying
> case without a problem. The second time they would not take him out because
> he was ready to attack; my mother had to leave him there and he was somehow
> sedated while they did the tests. The third time the vet simply would not
> examine him and we just got a refill for the Tapazole. My point is not to
> beat up on the vet, but it does leave me in a pickle-- I don't even know if
> they'll euthanize him unless he's practically three-quarters dead to start.
> I already had the sad experience of watching a cat die in my bedroom at 2 AM
> and I don't know if I want to go through that again. I'm tempted to try the
> radiation but if my vet won't even chance taking him out of the box maybe
> the vet who does the radiation won't either. I also hate the thought of
> leaving him for a week or even ten days (the figure I was given)-- he loves
> me to pieces and probably would think I'd abandoned him. And while I have
> plenty of money for my little friend if it will help him I wonder if I'll
> just be giving the cat a few extra months of low-quality life for a large
> expenditure. Any suggestions?
>
> Andrew


When my Siamese (RB 16) was in this condition, I chose to let nature take
its course. The medication that was given at first made her vomit
violently and she fought it so I figured it wasn't worth the struggle.
When the Vet suggested surgery, I asked him what was her chance of
recovery. He said "none". So that was when I decided to let her hang on
as long as she could. In the end, I had to have her PTS. It's a hard
decision to make. Best wishes for whatever you decide. MLB

Phil P.
December 29th 06, 11:51 AM
"Andrew M. Saucci, Jr." > wrote in message
t...
> I'm in a difficult situation and was wondering what others would
do.
> My cat is 14 years old. I took him to a vet about six months ago and he
was
> diagnosed with a hyperthyroid condition. I was given the usual choice of
> Tapazole, radiation, or surgery. We've tried the pills but the cat is
still
> vomiting three times a day (why we took him in the first place) and
getting
> thinner and thinner


What dosage did your vet prescribe? Beginning Tapazole therapy with a low-
sub-therapeutic dose and gradually increasing the dose reduces the chances
of the cat developing adverse effects. For example, starting dose: 1.125 mg
s.i.d x 14 d., then 1.125 mg b.i.d x 14 d, then 1.125 mg am/ 2.5 mg pm x14
d, then 2.5 mg b.i.d. etc. until his therapeutic dose is reached.


(although he still has healthy bowel movements besides).
> The other problem is that he has always been a bit headstrong. The first
> time I took him to the vet he must have been very sick and/or unacquainted
> with vets because they were actually able to take him out of the carrying
> case without a problem. The second time they would not take him out
because
> he was ready to attack; my mother had to leave him there and he was
somehow
> sedated while they did the tests. The third time the vet simply would not
> examine him and we just got a refill for the Tapazole.

My point is not to
> beat up on the vet,

Why not? One of the first things vets and LVTs are taught in school is
restraint and how to handle fractious animals. He's either incompetent or
too cheap to invest in a restraint module/cat bag- or he's just a prima
donna and only wants to treat cuddly animals- or he might not even like
cats! In either case, he's not a vet in which you want to entrust your
cat's life. What does he do with injured animals? Many of which are
extremely defensive. Does he refuse to treat them and just lets them suffer
and die because he only wants to treat cuddly animals? Your cat might be
trying to tell you something about him.



but it does leave me in a pickle-- I don't even know if
> they'll euthanize him unless he's practically three-quarters dead to
start.
> I already had the sad experience of watching a cat die in my bedroom at 2
AM
> and I don't know if I want to go through that again. I'm tempted to try
the
> radiation but if my vet won't even chance taking him out of the box maybe
> the vet who does the radiation won't either.

If you decide on I-131 tx, I'm sure the vets and LVTs at the radioiodine
facility are much more professional than your vet and experienced in
treating fractious animals.



I also hate the thought of
> leaving him for a week or even ten days (the figure I was given)-- he
loves
> me to pieces and probably would think I'd abandoned him. And while I have
> plenty of money for my little friend if it will help him I wonder if I'll
> just be giving the cat a few extra months of low-quality life for a large
> expenditure.

The vast majority of cats treated with radioiodine live long, happy lives-
providing, of course, they don't have other concurrent problems.


>Any suggestions?

The first order of business is find a different vet. Next, you might want to
try cutting the pills in half and putting them inside a #4 or #3 gelcap.
Tapazole (methimazole) has a very bitter taste which may be causing or
contributing to the vomiting. The gelcap will prevent your cat from tasting
the pill. You might also want to speak to your new vet about the Tapazole
transdermal formulation which is applied to the inside of earflap (pinna).
This might alleviate the vomiting. However, vomiting is a known side effect
of Tapazole by any route.

Another alternative is a drug called carbimazole- its an antithyroid drug
that's converted to methimazole in vivo. Carbimazole produces fewer and
milder side effects than Tapazole. However, carbimizole is only available
through a compounding pharmacy since its not available commercially in the
USA.

I had to opt for radioiodine for my 13 y/o because she became anorexic from
Tapazole. In my state, I-131 facilities are required to keep the animals in
the facility for 96 hours unless the animal develops separation-related
problems. My cat stopped eating on the 3rd day and began cowering in the
back of the cage so, I was allowed to bring her home a day early.

I'm sure you'll be more optimistic after you speak with a more professional
and competent vet. Dump your vet ASAP!

Best of luck,

Phil

bookie
December 29th 06, 02:50 PM
firstly - find another vet, this one is incompetent if he cannot handle
an old cat, no matter how fractious,also why has he not tried other
types of medication? there are many out there.

secondly - when you do find another vet ask about Felimazole which is
another hyperthyroid treatment, pill form yes, but I have had 2 cats on
it (one was on it when i got her, that is jessie, still with me) and
the other i started on it and neither had any side effects, nausea,
whatever. Hyperthyroidism is not a death sentence, it is just a
condition they have to live with and is easily treatable, you woudl not
know jessie has it as she is rather plumptious now.

thirdly - radiation treatment, was somethign which was mooted for
jasper but i decided against it because certainly in this country there
are only 2 places it can be carried out (cambridge and glasgow,
teaching vet hospitals) but the main reason i was put off was because i
woudl have to leave jasper in isoltaion for AT LEAST 2 months, and that
is complete isolation, not even vet nurses can touch him, because of
the radiation risk. Have they not explained this to you? haa the vet
not explained what exactly goes on in this treatment? radioactive
Iodine is placed inside the malfunctioning thyroid gland and the
radiation kills off the tumourous cells therein which are causing the
gland to overact, after uit has fininshed the tumour has goen and the
cat is cured basically, no more need for pill s or naything. That is if
your cat hasn;t died form a broken heart from being left in isolation
for 8 weeks that is, which is why I didn't go for it, that and the fact
it was no doubt hugely expensive and I really do not have the money.

find another vet, this is not a death sentence for your cat, where
there is a will there's a way!

Bookie