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December 30th 06, 02:28 AM
Besides our two "indoor" cats, we have a feral cat who spends most of
his time in our back yard. Adopting another cat isn't in the cards for
us, though we do feed him regularly. He was skin and bones when he
first came around, but now looks healthy, despite being very skiddish
when we open the door to feed him. My question is how concerned should
I be about the winter weather and this cat? We live in Northern
California, where temps rarely dip below 30 degrees. We've taken a cat
carrier and lined it with towels to give him a little shelter at night,
though I've never seen him use it. Do feral cats need a hand in the
winter? Should we provide any other facilities for him, a blanket to
snuggle in, or an actual cat house of some sort?

-Fleemo

Gail
December 30th 06, 03:15 AM
The ideal is a cat house or a dog house. You can place straw inside and and
face the door away from the wind. You are wonderful to help him.
Gail
> wrote in message
ps.com...
> Besides our two "indoor" cats, we have a feral cat who spends most of
> his time in our back yard. Adopting another cat isn't in the cards for
> us, though we do feed him regularly. He was skin and bones when he
> first came around, but now looks healthy, despite being very skiddish
> when we open the door to feed him. My question is how concerned should
> I be about the winter weather and this cat? We live in Northern
> California, where temps rarely dip below 30 degrees. We've taken a cat
> carrier and lined it with towels to give him a little shelter at night,
> though I've never seen him use it. Do feral cats need a hand in the
> winter? Should we provide any other facilities for him, a blanket to
> snuggle in, or an actual cat house of some sort?
>
> -Fleemo
>

Gail
December 30th 06, 03:17 AM
It is also very important to provide fresh water.
Gail
"Gail" > wrote in message
ink.net...
> The ideal is a cat house or a dog house. You can place straw inside and
> and face the door away from the wind. You are wonderful to help him.
> Gail
> > wrote in message
> ps.com...
>> Besides our two "indoor" cats, we have a feral cat who spends most of
>> his time in our back yard. Adopting another cat isn't in the cards for
>> us, though we do feed him regularly. He was skin and bones when he
>> first came around, but now looks healthy, despite being very skiddish
>> when we open the door to feed him. My question is how concerned should
>> I be about the winter weather and this cat? We live in Northern
>> California, where temps rarely dip below 30 degrees. We've taken a cat
>> carrier and lined it with towels to give him a little shelter at night,
>> though I've never seen him use it. Do feral cats need a hand in the
>> winter? Should we provide any other facilities for him, a blanket to
>> snuggle in, or an actual cat house of some sort?
>>
>> -Fleemo
>>
>
>

Wendy
December 30th 06, 12:02 PM
If you can provide him with a shelter to get in out of the wind and rain he
should be ok. Please also consider getting this boy neutered. You can trap
him with a live trap (these can usually be borrowed from a shelter or rescue
group for this purpose) and check around for a vet who is ok dealing with
ferals. You can go online and search for low cost spay/neuter to find any
voucher programs in your area. Once you get his weight up he will be healthy
enough to be out there reproducing. He'll stay much healthier if he doesn't
engage in that behavior and the cat fights that come with it.

W


> wrote in message
ps.com...
> Besides our two "indoor" cats, we have a feral cat who spends most of
> his time in our back yard. Adopting another cat isn't in the cards for
> us, though we do feed him regularly. He was skin and bones when he
> first came around, but now looks healthy, despite being very skiddish
> when we open the door to feed him. My question is how concerned should
> I be about the winter weather and this cat? We live in Northern
> California, where temps rarely dip below 30 degrees. We've taken a cat
> carrier and lined it with towels to give him a little shelter at night,
> though I've never seen him use it. Do feral cats need a hand in the
> winter? Should we provide any other facilities for him, a blanket to
> snuggle in, or an actual cat house of some sort?
>
> -Fleemo
>

m4816k
December 30th 06, 12:58 PM
> wrote in message
ps.com...
> Besides our two "indoor" cats, we have a feral cat who spends most of
> his time in our back yard. Adopting another cat isn't in the cards for
> us, though we do feed him regularly. He was skin and bones when he
> first came around, but now looks healthy, despite being very skiddish
> when we open the door to feed him. My question is how concerned should
> I be about the winter weather and this cat? We live in Northern
> California, where temps rarely dip below 30 degrees. We've taken a cat
> carrier and lined it with towels to give him a little shelter at night,
> though I've never seen him use it. Do feral cats need a hand in the
> winter? Should we provide any other facilities for him, a blanket to
> snuggle in, or an actual cat house of some sort?
>
> -Fleemo
>

Straw or some similar natural material is best for thermal isolation, that's
why people place it in barns for animals. Avoid fabrics, cause they tend to
soak the moisture from the air in, and become stiff and cold when temps
fall, providing little heat and comfort. Temps you mention are not very low,
and cats who are always outdoors adapt to colder weather rather easily (some
wild varieties even live in places like Siberia or South pole). Still, for
domestics, temps below -10C are serious.

kraut
December 30th 06, 01:39 PM
>Besides our two "indoor" cats, we have a feral cat who spends most of
>his time in our back yard. Adopting another cat isn't in the cards for
>us, though we do feed him regularly. He was skin and bones when he
>first came around, but now looks healthy, despite being very skiddish
>when we open the door to feed him. My question is how concerned should
>I be about the winter weather and this cat? We live in Northern
>California, where temps rarely dip below 30 degrees. We've taken a cat
>carrier and lined it with towels to give him a little shelter at night,
>though I've never seen him use it. Do feral cats need a hand in the
>winter? Should we provide any other facilities for him, a blanket to
>snuggle in, or an actual cat house of some sort?
>
>-Fleemo

I feed strays in Michigan and if they are young and friendly enough or
really old where you can tell they may not make it through a harsh
winter I will take them to a shelter and hope they find a home or I
will try to rehome them if I can get them.

The older ones that are used to life on the streets or are truly feral
I try to provide a place where they can get out of the weather and
make sure they have plenty of dry food available at all the time plus
a can or two of moist cat food a day. The moist usually freezes
during winter months unless they are there to eat when I put it out.
I try to give them the kind in gravy or with a lot of liquid on it so
they get their moisture because some winter days water freezes within
minutes of being put out.

Grawun
December 31st 06, 06:55 PM
kraut wrote:
> >Besides our two "indoor" cats, we have a feral cat who spends most of
> >his time in our back yard. Adopting another cat isn't in the cards for
> >us, though we do feed him regularly. He was skin and bones when he
> >first came around, but now looks healthy, despite being very skiddish
> >when we open the door to feed him. My question is how concerned should
> >I be about the winter weather and this cat? We live in Northern
> >California, where temps rarely dip below 30 degrees. We've taken a cat
> >carrier and lined it with towels to give him a little shelter at night,
> >though I've never seen him use it. Do feral cats need a hand in the
> >winter? Should we provide any other facilities for him, a blanket to
> >snuggle in, or an actual cat house of some sort?
> >
> >-Fleemo
>
I feed ferals in Pennsylvania. I made house out of one of those large
rubbermaid storage boxes. I cut a hole in the side and lined it with
carpet scraps. I have never seen them use it but there is a lot of cat
hair inside so I know they do..

Blairomatic
January 1st 07, 12:01 PM
wrote:
> Besides our two "indoor" cats, we have a feral cat who spends most of
> his time in our back yard. Adopting another cat isn't in the cards for
> us, though we do feed him regularly.

It seems like you already have 'adopted' him!

Blair ;-)

January 2nd 07, 03:28 AM
Hey, thanks to everyone for their input. :)

Yes indeed, we do offer him fresh water along with the food, though he
seems to prefer drinking out of the bird bath. He's a completely black
cat, and it's so cute to see him stand on his back legs to get a drink
out of the bird bath, his pink tongue dotting in and out of view as if
he's sending morse code or something.

Happy new year!

-Fleemo

Annie Wxill
January 2nd 07, 04:02 AM
> wrote in message
oups.com...
....it's so cute to see him stand on his back legs to get a drink
> out of the bird bath, his pink tongue dotting in and out of view as if
> he's sending morse code or something.
> -Fleemo


I love that description. I'd never would have thought of it that way.
Thanks for posting it.

Annie, who lives with a spoiled black cat

Brian Link
January 2nd 07, 04:42 AM
On 29 Dec 2006 18:28:15 -0800, wrote:

>Besides our two "indoor" cats, we have a feral cat who spends most of
>his time in our back yard. Adopting another cat isn't in the cards for
>us, though we do feed him regularly. He was skin and bones when he
>first came around, but now looks healthy, despite being very skiddish
>when we open the door to feed him. My question is how concerned should
>I be about the winter weather and this cat? We live in Northern
>California, where temps rarely dip below 30 degrees. We've taken a cat
>carrier and lined it with towels to give him a little shelter at night,
>though I've never seen him use it. Do feral cats need a hand in the
>winter? Should we provide any other facilities for him, a blanket to
>snuggle in, or an actual cat house of some sort?
>
>-Fleemo

In Minnesota, it's constantly amazing to me how feral colonies manage
the deep cold and heavy snow.

The other night I was out at a favorite late-night restaurant, and the
little Albanian cook was there. He'd told me in the past about how a
stray he'd decided to start feeding was doing so well, and in fact he
was in the kitchen. He invited me to visit his little adopted cat.

This cat was not a true feral - he'd obviously been socialized to
humans, since he was in the kitchen lapping up milk when I visited
him. True ferals will never mix with humans so easily. "Cat" was
happily parked beneath the refrigerator out vent, so he was bathed in
warm air while he ate.

A strong, tough, long-haired domestic Tom, he immediately rolled on
his back when I pet him. I lifted up his tail to sex him, and it was
obvious he was an un-altered tom.

I told the chef that he should fix "Cat", and if he couldn't afford
it, I'd pay for the procedure myself. There was a language barrier, so
I don't think he understood.

This is the main thing I'd suggest - if you see a wandering cat, get
it fixed ASAP, and if you can't afford it, google around to find
societies that will help foot the bill. My wife suggested that "Cat"'s
social status would drop if he were fixed, but that is a small price
to pay for helping your local wild population not produce more poor,
cold kitties in the future.

BLink
--------------------------
"The worst thing about censorship is [redacted]"

KP
January 2nd 07, 04:08 PM
Blairomatic wrote:
> wrote:
>> Besides our two "indoor" cats, we have a feral cat who spends most of
>> his time in our back yard. Adopting another cat isn't in the cards for
>> us, though we do feed him regularly.
>
> It seems like you already have 'adopted' him!
>
> Blair ;-)
>


I have a black cat that adopted us too. He is feral, someone dumped a
whole litter here in spring. I found 1 of the cats dumped to be pregnant
and she was very friendly. I managed to get her to a shelter and they
were going to wait for the kitties and then fix everyone and adopt them
out. I must have called 15 shelters before I found one that could take
her. But the others were so wild they wouldn't come near enough to catch.

This one little black cat is left, he got his ear torn and so skinny he
finally came up close enough that I offered him food. Now he comes up
for food and lets us pet him, won't allow anyone to pick him up though.
If it is raining he will come into the entry way with me and get
something to eat. I pulled up an igloo and put a chair cushion in it to
help keep him warm.

kp

Blairomatic
January 6th 07, 01:23 PM
KP wrote:
> This one little black cat is left, he got his ear torn and so skinny he
> finally came up close enough that I offered him food. Now he comes up
> for food and lets us pet him, won't allow anyone to pick him up though.
> If it is raining he will come into the entry way with me and get
> something to eat. I pulled up an igloo and put a chair cushion in it to
> help keep him warm.

You're a nice person.

That is exactly what I would do!

Blair