PDA

View Full Version : Cat Won't Stop Pawing Doors


Jill
January 2nd 07, 01:31 PM
Hello, I have had my cat from over a year now. He's been declawed and
neutered since I've owned him. He's never been affectionate towards me
expect when I first come home from work (and thats for about 5 mins).

Over the last 4 days, he's taken on a bad and very frustrating/annoying
behavior. Every late night/early morning (I'm talking about 3 or 4
am), he starts pawing on the closet door until he wakes me up then he
runs and hides. If he had claws it would be like he's sharpening his
claws in turbo mode.

The first time, he ran out into the kitchen where his bowl was and I
saw he was low on food and water so I topped his bowl off, thinking
that was his way of saying I'm hungry, then laid back down. About 20
mins later, he started it again. I sat up, he ran and hid. This will
continue until I'm up for the day; every 10 to 15 mins he's pawing a
door to wake me back up.

If it was just the one closet door, I'd think there was something in
there he wanted. However, I moved his carrier in front of the door, so
he then moved to the 2nd closet door. If I shut him out of the
bedroom, he paws the bedroom door until I wake up and let him in. If I
move out to try and sleep on my living room couch, he paws the front
door or the entry way coat closet door.

I've tried everything from giving him a light swat on the butt and
telling him no TO tossing a shoe at the wall near him (NOT at him, to
try and scare him away from the door; he runs, but comes back a few
mins later) TO putting him in his carrier (which he just paws at the
carrier door which is more annoying)....

I don't know what else to try, but I'm EXHAUSTED after being woken up
constantly...He doesn't like to play during waking hours and again he's
not an affectionate cat (very independent).

Can anyone suggest another idea? I'd love to get some sleep tonight.

milk bone
January 2nd 07, 02:02 PM
Jill wrote:
> Hello, I have had my cat from over a year now.

here is the root of the problem

> Can anyone suggest another idea? I'd love to get some sleep tonight.

maybe some pills and wine?

Spot
January 2nd 07, 02:23 PM
You think there is something in there he wants. Simple solution open the
door and let him in. It's more than likely a mouse. Let him do his job.
When my cats are this persistant that's usually what's going on.

Celeste

"Jill" > wrote in message
ps.com...
> Hello, I have had my cat from over a year now. He's been declawed and
> neutered since I've owned him. He's never been affectionate towards me
> expect when I first come home from work (and thats for about 5 mins).
>
> Over the last 4 days, he's taken on a bad and very frustrating/annoying
> behavior. Every late night/early morning (I'm talking about 3 or 4
> am), he starts pawing on the closet door until he wakes me up then he
> runs and hides. If he had claws it would be like he's sharpening his
> claws in turbo mode.
>
> The first time, he ran out into the kitchen where his bowl was and I
> saw he was low on food and water so I topped his bowl off, thinking
> that was his way of saying I'm hungry, then laid back down. About 20
> mins later, he started it again. I sat up, he ran and hid. This will
> continue until I'm up for the day; every 10 to 15 mins he's pawing a
> door to wake me back up.
>
> If it was just the one closet door, I'd think there was something in
> there he wanted. However, I moved his carrier in front of the door, so
> he then moved to the 2nd closet door. If I shut him out of the
> bedroom, he paws the bedroom door until I wake up and let him in. If I
> move out to try and sleep on my living room couch, he paws the front
> door or the entry way coat closet door.
>
> I've tried everything from giving him a light swat on the butt and
> telling him no TO tossing a shoe at the wall near him (NOT at him, to
> try and scare him away from the door; he runs, but comes back a few
> mins later) TO putting him in his carrier (which he just paws at the
> carrier door which is more annoying)....
>
> I don't know what else to try, but I'm EXHAUSTED after being woken up
> constantly...He doesn't like to play during waking hours and again he's
> not an affectionate cat (very independent).
>
> Can anyone suggest another idea? I'd love to get some sleep tonight.
>

Lynne
January 2nd 07, 03:13 PM
on Tue, 02 Jan 2007 12:31:56 GMT, "Jill" > wrote:

> Hello, I have had my cat from over a year now. He's been declawed and
> neutered since I've owned him.

How recently was he declawed? This could be a behavioral by product of
that procedure.

In any case, I'd do what Celeste recommended and let him in the closet.
Don't get up and feed him, or you'll teach him that he will get fed by
waking you up.

If letting him into the closet doesn't help, I'd be a big meanypants and
shut him in a room far from my bedroom. That will probably break him of
the habit in just a couple of nights. Or at least you won't hear him.

--
Lynne

bookie
January 2nd 07, 03:32 PM
Jill wrote:
> Hello, I have had my cat from over a year now. He's been declawed and
> neutered since I've owned him.

why on earth did you declaw him? that is unnatural and he is probably
showing some sort of bizarre behaviour as a result of that. cats need
to scratch in order mark their territory otherwise they get very
unhappy, stressed and insecure, and obviously start to show odd
behaviour in order to work out their frustrations. I hope he pees all
over your house to get you back for it.

god, when will you yanks outlaw this barbaric behaviour? it is
disgusting, cruel and highly unnecessary. Shall i come round and pull
out all your teeth and nails for you in return? or maybe cutting your
hands off will go some way to making you people realise what it means
to be declawed.

AAAAAAAAAAARRRRRRRRRRRGGGGGGGGHHH! (that's my frustration at people
stil continuing with this nasty practise just to protect their crappy
cheap furniture which is of no value at all compared to the health and
happiness of a beautiful cat)

bookie

barb
January 2nd 07, 05:01 PM
Leave all doors open.

--
Barb
Of course I don't look busy,
I did it right the first time.

nay
January 2nd 07, 06:17 PM
I agree, my cat usually wants something when he is so
persistant.....they are cats after all. My other kitty Mikey usually
scratches on the door to be let out so he can either get some air or do
his business. No cat likes a dirty litter box. My cat Mogus scratches
on the side of my bed if he wants something....I usually just get up
and follow him to either the bathroom for fresher water or the kitchen
for extra nibbles.
they are quite smart.


Spot wrote:
> You think there is something in there he wants. Simple solution open the
> door and let him in. It's more than likely a mouse. Let him do his job.
> When my cats are this persistant that's usually what's going on.
>
>

Jill
January 2nd 07, 07:33 PM
Bookie, he was already declawed when I got him from the humane society.
I asked for help, not a nasty response about declawing....So RUDE!

cybercat
January 2nd 07, 07:52 PM
"Jill" > wrote in message
ps.com...
> Bookie, he was already declawed when I got him from the humane society.
> I asked for help, not a nasty response about declawing....So RUDE!
>

Just open the door. And, given how humane people think about declawing,
better to let people know right away that you are not responsible.

cybercat
January 2nd 07, 08:07 PM
"Jill" > wrote in message
ps.com...

>
> If it was just the one closet door, I'd think there was something in
> there he wanted. However, I moved his carrier in front of the door, so
> he then moved to the 2nd closet door. If I shut him out of the
> bedroom, he paws the bedroom door until I wake up and let him in. If I
> move out to try and sleep on my living room couch, he paws the front
> door or the entry way coat closet door.
>
> I've tried everything from giving him a light swat on the butt and
> telling him no TO tossing a shoe at the wall near him (NOT at him, to
> try and scare him away from the door; he runs, but comes back a few
> mins later) TO putting him in his carrier (which he just paws at the
> carrier door which is more annoying)....
>
> I don't know what else to try, but I'm EXHAUSTED after being woken up
> constantly...He doesn't like to play during waking hours and again he's
> not an affectionate cat (very independent).
>
> Can anyone suggest another idea? I'd love to get some sleep tonight.
>

Besides opening all the doors, you could confine him to the room farthest
away from the one where you sleep while you are sleeping. If your place is
small (or even if not), get a large HEPA filter, floor model, and put it by
your bed. The sound will drown him out. (My declawed cat did this
to magazines and windows, anything smooth. I have no idea why. I
guess I lucked out because she did not do it at night.)

Jill
January 2nd 07, 08:42 PM
Sorry to clarify...I have had my cat for 1 year. He's estimated to be
18 months now. I got him as a stray recovery from the humane society.
When I got him, he was already neutered and declawed. They didn't have
any paperwork on him; just that he was apparently a pet someone
abandoned...

Its more than 1 door that he's messing with. If it was just the one
door, I'd just let him in there to find out what it is. He does this
in whatever room I'm in. I've tried moving out to the couch to sleep
out there, but he does it with the main entry way door and the hall
closet door too....This was only a problem as of 4 days ago. He's been
fairly happy and well adjusted after the first week I had him (he was a
little shy/skittish when I first brought him home).

cybercat
January 2nd 07, 10:09 PM
"Jill" > wrote in message
oups.com...
> Sorry to clarify...I have had my cat for 1 year. He's estimated to be
> 18 months now. I got him as a stray recovery from the humane society.
> When I got him, he was already neutered and declawed. They didn't have
> any paperwork on him; just that he was apparently a pet someone
> abandoned...

Bless you for taking him. I am sorry he is not friendlier. He may grow
warmer in time.
>
> Its more than 1 door that he's messing with. If it was just the one
> door, I'd just let him in there to find out what it is. He does this
> in whatever room I'm in. I've tried moving out to the couch to sleep
> out there, but he does it with the main entry way door and the hall
> closet door too....This was only a problem as of 4 days ago. He's been
> fairly happy and well adjusted after the first week I had him (he was a
> little shy/skittish when I first brought him home).
>

What is the down side to opening all the doors?

Lynne
January 2nd 07, 10:37 PM
on Tue, 02 Jan 2007 19:42:59 GMT, "Jill" > wrote:

> Sorry to clarify...I have had my cat for 1 year. He's estimated to be
> 18 months now. I got him as a stray recovery from the humane society.
> When I got him, he was already neutered and declawed. They didn't have
> any paperwork on him; just that he was apparently a pet someone
> abandoned...

He's very lucky to have you.

> Its more than 1 door that he's messing with. If it was just the one
> door, I'd just let him in there to find out what it is. He does this
> in whatever room I'm in. I've tried moving out to the couch to sleep
> out there, but he does it with the main entry way door and the hall
> closet door too....This was only a problem as of 4 days ago. He's been
> fairly happy and well adjusted after the first week I had him (he was a
> little shy/skittish when I first brought him home).

I had a similar problem with my older cat, but it was just one door he
wanted in, a closet with double doors that didn't latch. He figured out
how to just pop them open and go in. So I tied the handles together, but
he kept trying. And trying... and always in the middle of the night. So
what I did, when he would start going at it, was to pick him up and put him
out of my room and shut the door. Next night, the same. Rinse, repeat.
Eventually he stopped trying and now I don't even have to tie the handles
together. He didn't want to be put out of my room, so he stopped. He
stays in my room all night, quietly.

I would suggest you do something similar. Wait until the offending
behavior starts, and then put him in a room where you can't hear him. Keep
doing that until he understands. It probably won't take him long. If you
can't put him far enough away to where you can't hear him, try a little
sound machine with white noise next to your bed. They are inexpensive and
very effective at masking the sounds of wild kitties in the night.

Good luck!

--
Lynne

http://picasaweb.google.com/what.the.hell.is.it/

Matthew
January 2nd 07, 11:19 PM
Bookie DID YOU BOTHER TO ASK IF THEY DECLAWED HIM? You jumped the gun

I have done shelter and rescue work just like a lot of us out here have. Do
know how many furballs are brought in declawed. The shelter adopted them
out just like the other rescues.

Yes declawing is a sick process and totally barbaric unless medical
necessary but you can't believe how many people don't know what is involved
in it. IMO it should be outlawed everywhere but you can assume everyone
that has a declawed cat DID it to the cat.


"bookie" > wrote in message
ups.com...
>
> Jill wrote:
>> Hello, I have had my cat from over a year now. He's been declawed and
>> neutered since I've owned him.
>
> why on earth did you declaw him? that is unnatural and he is probably
> showing some sort of bizarre behaviour as a result of that. cats need
> to scratch in order mark their territory otherwise they get very
> unhappy, stressed and insecure, and obviously start to show odd
> behaviour in order to work out their frustrations. I hope he pees all
> over your house to get you back for it.
>
> god, when will you yanks outlaw this barbaric behaviour? it is
> disgusting, cruel and highly unnecessary. Shall i come round and pull
> out all your teeth and nails for you in return? or maybe cutting your
> hands off will go some way to making you people realise what it means
> to be declawed.
>
> AAAAAAAAAAARRRRRRRRRRRGGGGGGGGHHH! (that's my frustration at people
> stil continuing with this nasty practise just to protect their crappy
> cheap furniture which is of no value at all compared to the health and
> happiness of a beautiful cat)
>
> bookie
>

Matthew
January 2nd 07, 11:35 PM
Jill there are several ways to deal with this.

1 let the furball in or out of the carrier

2 as some one else pointed out it could be a behavioral by product of the
declawing depending on how long ago it was. but this I doubt from what I
have read so far

3 you can get them more toys to keep furball occupied

4 IMO sounds like the furball is training you for the attention that it
wants. It paws you open door and pay attention to it.

5 There are several ways to stop them from doing this take a coffee can
full of marbles when furball does it rattle that can like no tomorrow or
you can take a hair dryer and set it up by the door with an extension corded
the furball paws than plug in hair dryer pussy cat in both incidents runs
like the sky is falling most stop after second or third time If not than it
becomes death from above ( water )

6 Try setting up a scratching post maybe the door feels good to him
stretching his paws

7 Also try give him more attention some how some way earlier in the evening
cats are nocturnal sleeping up to 18 hours a day.

8 If this just started is there anything that has changed in the household
cats can pick up on stressful situation and act on it in our terms peculiar
ways. Example new furniture new boyfriend girlfriend new daily routine


Me I gave up along time ago and let them in the room and put up with the
wake up calls. If they get too bad I use the OH MY GOD VOICE and they
scatter not coming back for awhile. But like most cat slaves most of us have
become tolerant of our masters needs

Ohh pss all cats our independent dogs have masters cats have slaves


"Jill" > wrote in message
ps.com...
> Hello, I have had my cat from over a year now. He's been declawed and
> neutered since I've owned him. He's never been affectionate towards me
> expect when I first come home from work (and thats for about 5 mins).
>
> Over the last 4 days, he's taken on a bad and very frustrating/annoying
> behavior. Every late night/early morning (I'm talking about 3 or 4
> am), he starts pawing on the closet door until he wakes me up then he
> runs and hides. If he had claws it would be like he's sharpening his
> claws in turbo mode.
>
> The first time, he ran out into the kitchen where his bowl was and I
> saw he was low on food and water so I topped his bowl off, thinking
> that was his way of saying I'm hungry, then laid back down. About 20
> mins later, he started it again. I sat up, he ran and hid. This will
> continue until I'm up for the day; every 10 to 15 mins he's pawing a
> door to wake me back up.
>
> If it was just the one closet door, I'd think there was something in
> there he wanted. However, I moved his carrier in front of the door, so
> he then moved to the 2nd closet door. If I shut him out of the
> bedroom, he paws the bedroom door until I wake up and let him in. If I
> move out to try and sleep on my living room couch, he paws the front
> door or the entry way coat closet door.
>
> I've tried everything from giving him a light swat on the butt and
> telling him no TO tossing a shoe at the wall near him (NOT at him, to
> try and scare him away from the door; he runs, but comes back a few
> mins later) TO putting him in his carrier (which he just paws at the
> carrier door which is more annoying)....
>
> I don't know what else to try, but I'm EXHAUSTED after being woken up
> constantly...He doesn't like to play during waking hours and again he's
> not an affectionate cat (very independent).
>
> Can anyone suggest another idea? I'd love to get some sleep tonight.
>

bookie
January 3rd 07, 12:05 AM
Jill wrote:
> Bookie, he was already declawed when I got him from the humane society.
> I asked for help, not a nasty response about declawing....So RUDE!

like i said to you personally, your message implied that he had been
declawed whilst in your care and therefore it would appear to myself,
and many others reading, that you had been responsible for this
declawing, so what the hell do you expect me to say? be clearer in your
posting in future especially when referring to declawing or you will
get a sharp response from myself and a fair few other people on the
matter (am I the only person here who can actually read English?)

I am not apologising for someone else's inability to communicate
correctly

Lynne
January 3rd 07, 01:04 AM
on Wed, 03 Jan 2007 00:00:05 GMT, Cheryl >
wrote:

> These Usenet groups have been through the declaw battle for ages,
> and likely for ages to come. Our uncivilized (to animals) country
> (USA) still has many people who believe that indoor cats *must* be
> declawed, and some vets actually promote declawing as a service
> they provide along with neutering. Two for one. Some people
> honestly don't realize what the barbaric procedure entails because
> vets don't tell them. It comes across as a permanent manicure.
>
> It is much more effective for groups like this to educate rather
> than berate, no matter how hard it is to hold back the emotion that
> comes out when hearing that another cat was declawed. When I first
> found these groups I didn't know these things. It only took a
> picture of the cut-off claws for me to be mortified that I would
> have ever considered having one of my beautiful cats declawed. I
> feel very lucky to have been educated here.

Very well said, Cheryl. Quoting in full here because it bears repeating.

Thank you.

--
Lynne

http://picasaweb.google.com/what.the.hell.is.it/

Cheryl
January 3rd 07, 01:16 AM
On Tue 02 Jan 2007 07:04:11p, Lynne wrote in
rec.pets.cats.health+behav
. 97.142>:

> Very well said, Cheryl. Quoting in full here because it bears
> repeating.
>
> Thank you.
>

And, thank you. This wasn't a message to Jill because I read that
her cat was already declawed when she adopted him. That's another
thing that I hope people learn, that if they really feel they need
to have a declawed cat, there are plenty in the shelters to adopt.
The problem then is that they will learn *why* they are in the
shelters. Too many behavioral issues that come along post-surgery.
And many times, *years* post-surgery. I hope that people can learn
that cats need to be able to stretch, and they do it by hooking
their claws into something. When they have something that is
totally theirs, they learn quickly (the cat; not us stoopid hoomins
LOL) that it is theirs and continue to exercise this way. Ugh,
don't get me started. LOL

--
Cheryl

Cat Psychologist
January 3rd 07, 01:36 AM
cybercat wrote:

> Besides opening all the doors, you could confine him to the room farthest
> away from the one where you sleep while you are sleeping. If your place is
> small (or even if not), get a large HEPA filter, floor model, and put it by
> your bed. The sound will drown him out. (My declawed cat did this
> to magazines and windows, anything smooth. I have no idea why. I
> guess I lucked out because she did not do it at night.)

Hi, remember cats have scent glands in between their toes or
therbouts...
so they are also marking

I imagine dc cats need to beat the **** out of something
@$#%$#%^#^#%$$#%$#

raaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaahh rrrrrrrrrr

cybercat
January 3rd 07, 02:02 AM
"Cat Psychologist" > wrote in
>
> Hi, remember cats have scent glands in between their toes or
> therbouts...
> so they are also marking

Yes. This pawing thing declawed cats do is weird, it is a
frenzied kind of thing Snidely liked to do on smooth surfaces.
Maybe trying to make her paws feel like her paws again. :(

>
> I imagine dc cats need to beat the **** out of something
> @$#%$#%^#^#%$$#%$#
>
> raaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaahh rrrrrrrrrr
>

Well, she used me for that. She got me with her teeth and her back
claws.

Matthew
January 3rd 07, 02:04 AM
number 5 is a last resort let me make that clear


"Matthew" > wrote in message
...
> Jill there are several ways to deal with this.
>
> 1 let the furball in or out of the carrier
>
> 2 as some one else pointed out it could be a behavioral by product of the
> declawing depending on how long ago it was. but this I doubt from what I
> have read so far
>
> 3 you can get them more toys to keep furball occupied
>
> 4 IMO sounds like the furball is training you for the attention that it
> wants. It paws you open door and pay attention to it.
>
> 5 There are several ways to stop them from doing this take a coffee can
> full of marbles when furball does it rattle that can like no tomorrow or
> you can take a hair dryer and set it up by the door with an extension
> corded the furball paws than plug in hair dryer pussy cat in both
> incidents runs like the sky is falling most stop after second or third
> time If not than it becomes death from above ( water )
>
> 6 Try setting up a scratching post maybe the door feels good to him
> stretching his paws
>
> 7 Also try give him more attention some how some way earlier in the
> evening cats are nocturnal sleeping up to 18 hours a day.
>
> 8 If this just started is there anything that has changed in the household
> cats can pick up on stressful situation and act on it in our terms
> peculiar ways. Example new furniture new boyfriend girlfriend new daily
> routine
>
>
> Me I gave up along time ago and let them in the room and put up with the
> wake up calls. If they get too bad I use the OH MY GOD VOICE and they
> scatter not coming back for awhile. But like most cat slaves most of us
> have become tolerant of our masters needs
>
> Ohh pss all cats our independent dogs have masters cats have slaves
>
>
> "Jill" > wrote in message
> ps.com...
>> Hello, I have had my cat from over a year now. He's been declawed and
>> neutered since I've owned him. He's never been affectionate towards me
>> expect when I first come home from work (and thats for about 5 mins).
>>
>> Over the last 4 days, he's taken on a bad and very frustrating/annoying
>> behavior. Every late night/early morning (I'm talking about 3 or 4
>> am), he starts pawing on the closet door until he wakes me up then he
>> runs and hides. If he had claws it would be like he's sharpening his
>> claws in turbo mode.
>>
>> The first time, he ran out into the kitchen where his bowl was and I
>> saw he was low on food and water so I topped his bowl off, thinking
>> that was his way of saying I'm hungry, then laid back down. About 20
>> mins later, he started it again. I sat up, he ran and hid. This will
>> continue until I'm up for the day; every 10 to 15 mins he's pawing a
>> door to wake me back up.
>>
>> If it was just the one closet door, I'd think there was something in
>> there he wanted. However, I moved his carrier in front of the door, so
>> he then moved to the 2nd closet door. If I shut him out of the
>> bedroom, he paws the bedroom door until I wake up and let him in. If I
>> move out to try and sleep on my living room couch, he paws the front
>> door or the entry way coat closet door.
>>
>> I've tried everything from giving him a light swat on the butt and
>> telling him no TO tossing a shoe at the wall near him (NOT at him, to
>> try and scare him away from the door; he runs, but comes back a few
>> mins later) TO putting him in his carrier (which he just paws at the
>> carrier door which is more annoying)....
>>
>> I don't know what else to try, but I'm EXHAUSTED after being woken up
>> constantly...He doesn't like to play during waking hours and again he's
>> not an affectionate cat (very independent).
>>
>> Can anyone suggest another idea? I'd love to get some sleep tonight.
>>
>
>

Lynne
January 3rd 07, 02:21 AM
on Wed, 03 Jan 2007 00:16:45 GMT, Cheryl >
wrote:

> And, thank you. This wasn't a message to Jill because I read that
> her cat was already declawed when she adopted him. That's another
> thing that I hope people learn, that if they really feel they need
> to have a declawed cat, there are plenty in the shelters to adopt.
> The problem then is that they will learn *why* they are in the
> shelters. Too many behavioral issues that come along post-surgery.
> And many times, *years* post-surgery. I hope that people can learn
> that cats need to be able to stretch, and they do it by hooking
> their claws into something. When they have something that is
> totally theirs, they learn quickly (the cat; not us stoopid hoomins
> LOL) that it is theirs and continue to exercise this way. Ugh,
> don't get me started. LOL

I agree with you again!

Also, I know your message wasn't to Jill and was to someone who was
shrieking at her. The thing is, that wouldn't be appropriate even if Jill
was the one who had the cat declawed IMO. Most people who do this simply
don't understand (as you pointed out) and it is far better to educate than
to alienate.

--
Lynne

http://picasaweb.google.com/what.the.hell.is.it/

cardarch
January 3rd 07, 02:22 AM
If he has no claws and so cannot damage the doors he wishes to open
then he cant be making much noise so you could just keep some earplugs
next to your bed and insert them into your ear canals when ever he
makes this little racket.


Matthew wrote:
> number 5 is a last resort let me make that clear
>
>
> "Matthew" > wrote in message
> ...
> > Jill there are several ways to deal with this.
> >
> > 1 let the furball in or out of the carrier
> >
> > 2 as some one else pointed out it could be a behavioral by product of the
> > declawing depending on how long ago it was. but this I doubt from what I
> > have read so far
> >
> > 3 you can get them more toys to keep furball occupied
> >
> > 4 IMO sounds like the furball is training you for the attention that it
> > wants. It paws you open door and pay attention to it.
> >
> > 5 There are several ways to stop them from doing this take a coffee can
> > full of marbles when furball does it rattle that can like no tomorrow or
> > you can take a hair dryer and set it up by the door with an extension
> > corded the furball paws than plug in hair dryer pussy cat in both
> > incidents runs like the sky is falling most stop after second or third
> > time If not than it becomes death from above ( water )
> >
> > 6 Try setting up a scratching post maybe the door feels good to him
> > stretching his paws
> >
> > 7 Also try give him more attention some how some way earlier in the
> > evening cats are nocturnal sleeping up to 18 hours a day.
> >
> > 8 If this just started is there anything that has changed in the household
> > cats can pick up on stressful situation and act on it in our terms
> > peculiar ways. Example new furniture new boyfriend girlfriend new daily
> > routine
> >
> >
> > Me I gave up along time ago and let them in the room and put up with the
> > wake up calls. If they get too bad I use the OH MY GOD VOICE and they
> > scatter not coming back for awhile. But like most cat slaves most of us
> > have become tolerant of our masters needs
> >
> > Ohh pss all cats our independent dogs have masters cats have slaves
> >
> >
> > "Jill" > wrote in message
> > ps.com...
> >> Hello, I have had my cat from over a year now. He's been declawed and
> >> neutered since I've owned him. He's never been affectionate towards me
> >> expect when I first come home from work (and thats for about 5 mins).
> >>
> >> Over the last 4 days, he's taken on a bad and very frustrating/annoying
> >> behavior. Every late night/early morning (I'm talking about 3 or 4
> >> am), he starts pawing on the closet door until he wakes me up then he
> >> runs and hides. If he had claws it would be like he's sharpening his
> >> claws in turbo mode.
> >>
> >> The first time, he ran out into the kitchen where his bowl was and I
> >> saw he was low on food and water so I topped his bowl off, thinking
> >> that was his way of saying I'm hungry, then laid back down. About 20
> >> mins later, he started it again. I sat up, he ran and hid. This will
> >> continue until I'm up for the day; every 10 to 15 mins he's pawing a
> >> door to wake me back up.
> >>
> >> If it was just the one closet door, I'd think there was something in
> >> there he wanted. However, I moved his carrier in front of the door, so
> >> he then moved to the 2nd closet door. If I shut him out of the
> >> bedroom, he paws the bedroom door until I wake up and let him in. If I
> >> move out to try and sleep on my living room couch, he paws the front
> >> door or the entry way coat closet door.
> >>
> >> I've tried everything from giving him a light swat on the butt and
> >> telling him no TO tossing a shoe at the wall near him (NOT at him, to
> >> try and scare him away from the door; he runs, but comes back a few
> >> mins later) TO putting him in his carrier (which he just paws at the
> >> carrier door which is more annoying)....
> >>
> >> I don't know what else to try, but I'm EXHAUSTED after being woken up
> >> constantly...He doesn't like to play during waking hours and again he's
> >> not an affectionate cat (very independent).
> >>
> >> Can anyone suggest another idea? I'd love to get some sleep tonight.
> >>
> >
> >

Charlie Wilkes
January 3rd 07, 02:25 AM
On 2 Jan 2007 15:05:18 -0800, "bookie" >
wrote:

>
>Jill wrote:
>> Bookie, he was already declawed when I got him from the humane society.
>> I asked for help, not a nasty response about declawing....So RUDE!
>
>like i said to you personally, your message implied that he had been
>declawed whilst in your care

I didn't read it that way.

>and therefore it would appear to myself,
>and many others reading, that you had been responsible for this
>declawing, so what the hell do you expect me to say? be clearer in your
>posting in future especially when referring to declawing or you will
>get a sharp response from myself and a fair few other people on the
>matter (am I the only person here who can actually read English?)
>
>I am not apologising for someone else's inability to communicate
>correctly

She communicates just fine. You went off half-cocked and made
yourself look like a sanctimonious twit.

Charlie

Lynne
January 3rd 07, 02:31 AM
on Wed, 03 Jan 2007 01:25:50 GMT, Charlie Wilkes
> wrote:

> I didn't read it that way.

Neither did I.

> She communicates just fine. You went off half-cocked and made
> yourself look like a sanctimonious twit.

BING!

--
Lynne

http://picasaweb.google.com/what.the.hell.is.it/

Cheryl
January 3rd 07, 02:33 AM
On Tue 02 Jan 2007 05:35:04p, Matthew wrote in
rec.pets.cats.health+behav
>:

> 5 There are several ways to stop them from doing this take a
> coffee can full of marbles when furball does it rattle that can
> like no tomorrow or you can take a hair dryer and set it up by
> the door with an extension corded the furball paws than plug in
> hair dryer pussy cat in both incidents runs like the sky is
> falling most stop after second or third time If not than it
> becomes death from above ( water )


But never mix a turned-on hairdryer with water. ;)

--
Cheryl

Cheryl
January 3rd 07, 02:35 AM
On Tue 02 Jan 2007 08:22:01p, cardarch wrote in
rec.pets.cats.health+behav
ups.com>:

>
> If he has no claws and so cannot damage the doors he wishes to
> open then he cant be making much noise so you could just keep
> some earplugs next to your bed and insert them into your ear
> canals when ever he makes this little racket.

Thank you. You have the best point of all! How noisy can it be to
have a declawed cat pawing at a door? I've never had a declawed cat,
so it didn't occur to me that it can't be at all noisy. My gang is
noisy at everything they do, so nothing fazes me any more.

--
Cheryl

Matthew
January 3rd 07, 03:27 AM
"Cheryl" > wrote in message
...
> On Tue 02 Jan 2007 08:22:01p, cardarch wrote in
> rec.pets.cats.health+behav
> ups.com>:
>
>>
>> If he has no claws and so cannot damage the doors he wishes to
>> open then he cant be making much noise so you could just keep
>> some earplugs next to your bed and insert them into your ear
>> canals when ever he makes this little racket.
>
> Thank you. You have the best point of all! How noisy can it be to
> have a declawed cat pawing at a door? I've never had a declawed cat,
> so it didn't occur to me that it can't be at all noisy. My gang is
> noisy at everything they do, so nothing fazes me any more.
>
> --
> Cheryl
>
>
What cat doesn't make a show of what they are doing ;-)

Matthew
January 3rd 07, 04:04 AM
"Matthew" > wrote in message
...
>
> "Cheryl" > wrote in message
> ...
>> On Tue 02 Jan 2007 08:22:01p, cardarch wrote in
>> rec.pets.cats.health+behav
>> ups.com>:
>>
>>>
>>> If he has no claws and so cannot damage the doors he wishes to
>>> open then he cant be making much noise so you could just keep
>>> some earplugs next to your bed and insert them into your ear
>>> canals when ever he makes this little racket.
>>
>> Thank you. You have the best point of all! How noisy can it be to
>> have a declawed cat pawing at a door? I've never had a declawed cat,
>> so it didn't occur to me that it can't be at all noisy. My gang is
>> noisy at everything they do, so nothing fazes me any more.
>>
>> --
>> Cheryl
>>
>>
> What cat doesn't make a show of what they are doing ;-)
Or is that just Barry ;-)

bookie
January 3rd 07, 04:30 AM
Charlie Wilkes wrote:
> On 2 Jan 2007 15:05:18 -0800, "bookie" >
> wrote:
>
> >
> >Jill wrote:
> >> Bookie, he was already declawed when I got him from the humane society.
> >> I asked for help, not a nasty response about declawing....So RUDE!
> >
> >like i said to you personally, your message implied that he had been
> >declawed whilst in your care
>
> I didn't read it that way.
>
> >and therefore it would appear to myself,
> >and many others reading, that you had been responsible for this
> >declawing, so what the hell do you expect me to say? be clearer in your
> >posting in future especially when referring to declawing or you will
> >get a sharp response from myself and a fair few other people on the
> >matter (am I the only person here who can actually read English?)
> >
> >I am not apologising for someone else's inability to communicate
> >correctly
>
> She communicates just fine. You went off half-cocked and made
> yourself look like a sanctimonious twit.


read her post again, if you had the even the most basic grasp of
english and it's intricacies then you would realise that she WAS
implying that she had had the cat declawed whilst in her care.
also do you know what sanctimonious actually means? probably not

bookie
January 3rd 07, 04:37 AM
Lynne wrote:
> on Wed, 03 Jan 2007 01:25:50 GMT, Charlie Wilkes
> > wrote:
>
> > I didn't read it that way.
>
> Neither did I.
>
> > She communicates just fine. You went off half-cocked and made
> > yourself look like a sanctimonious twit.
>
> BING!
>
quote taken from the first posting by jill:

"He's been declawed and
neutered since I've owned him"

how does this NOT imply that he was declawed after she got hold of him?
I know you yanks voted bush in again and all that but you can't
possibly be that stupid not to see this glaring error

Rhonda
January 3rd 07, 05:41 AM
bookie wrote:
>
> like i said to you personally, your message implied that he had been
> declawed whilst in your care and therefore it would appear to myself,
> and many others reading, that you had been responsible for this
> declawing, so what the hell do you expect me to say?

I didn't think it implied for certain that the cat was declawed in her
care. It was ambiguous to me. I would have asked her first.

Rhonda

Rhonda
January 3rd 07, 05:44 AM
bookie wrote:

> quote taken from the first posting by jill:
>
> "He's been declawed and
> neutered since I've owned him"
>
> how does this NOT imply that he was declawed after she got hold of him?
> I know you yanks voted bush in again and all that but you can't
> possibly be that stupid not to see this glaring error


Wow, you really are prejudice against "yanks," aren't you? I don't see
comments like that too often.

Rhonda

Rhonda
January 3rd 07, 05:51 AM
Jill,

I think it's not about the door at all -- it's about getting your
attention. The first time he was trying to tell you about the food and
water and he saw that waking you up resulted into a positive cat
experience (food!). Now it's more or less a habit and he's going to try
for your attention.

That's my take on it, anyway.

If that is the case, the only way I know to stop it is to ignore him. I
know that will be tough, but maybe the earplug idea someone mentioned
would work.

The other thing you might do is get him a playmate and let them tear
around the house together at 4am like any self-respecting cat. He may
forget trying to get your attention, but you may be awakened by thunder
paws through the house.

Rhonda

Jill wrote:
> Over the last 4 days, he's taken on a bad and very frustrating/annoying
> behavior. Every late night/early morning (I'm talking about 3 or 4
> am), he starts pawing on the closet door until he wakes me up then he
> runs and hides. If he had claws it would be like he's sharpening his
> claws in turbo mode.
>
> The first time, he ran out into the kitchen where his bowl was and I
> saw he was low on food and water so I topped his bowl off, thinking
> that was his way of saying I'm hungry, then laid back down. About 20
> mins later, he started it again. I sat up, he ran and hid. This will
> continue until I'm up for the day; every 10 to 15 mins he's pawing a
> door to wake me back up.

Lynne
January 3rd 07, 06:01 AM
on Wed, 03 Jan 2007 04:41:03 GMT, Rhonda > wrote:

> I would have asked her first.

But you are a reasonable person...

--
Lynne

http://picasaweb.google.com/what.the.hell.is.it/

Matthew
January 3rd 07, 07:02 AM
"bookie" > wrote in message
oups.com...
>
> Lynne wrote:
>> on Wed, 03 Jan 2007 01:25:50 GMT, Charlie Wilkes
>> > wrote:
>>
>> > I didn't read it that way.
>>
>> Neither did I.
>>
>> > She communicates just fine. You went off half-cocked and made
>> > yourself look like a sanctimonious twit.
>>
>> BING!
>>
> quote taken from the first posting by jill:
>
> "He's been declawed and
> neutered since I've owned him"
>
> how does this NOT imply that he was declawed after she got hold of him?
> I know you yanks voted bush in again and all that but you can't
> possibly be that stupid not to see this glaring error
>

Don't be stupid and turns this political. Just say I was wrong and move on.
If it is going to be that hard for you to do. I can see the flames now

Jill
January 3rd 07, 07:10 AM
bookie wrote:

> read her post again, if you had the even the most basic grasp of
> english and it's intricacies then you would realise that she WAS
> implying that she had had the cat declawed whilst in her care.

Bookie, I do have "even the most basic grasp of english". English is
my first language and I graduated at the top of my class with
honors....Anyway, yes, I can see where you could come to the conclusion
that I personally had my cat declawed, but my comment could have gone
either way. It would have been polite to ask (as someone else did) why
I would declaw my cat and then if I said "I did it because of blah,
blah, blah reasons", voice your opinion. You have the right to be
passionate about not having cats declawed and others may feel
differently. Wishing me harm, wishing for my cat to urinate all over
my house, and your other comments were very inappropriate and I took
offense to them; whether you felt I wasn't clear or not with my
statement, it is no excuse to say horrible things to someone who is new
to this group and was looking for advice from fellow cat lovers.

First, if you look when I posted, it was just after 6 am. This is
after having about three hours sleep as my cat had started at 3am with
pawing the doors and about 5 hours sleep the day before that and I
could go back even farther with how little sleep I have gotten!
Personally, most people don't really function well on that little of
sleep. After reading your extremely rude post and the question from
the other person about why and when I had him declawed, I realized that
I wasn't very clear and that is why I posted my follow up. Obviously,
other people have taken my post as I intended it. If I had him
declawed and neutered personally, I would have said, "Since I owned him
I have had him declawed and neutered".

Now, whether I PERSONALLY had the cat declawed or not, was not the
point of my post. I had a legitimate question. Even so, I live in an
apartment complex and I chose this cat because of two reasons:

1) He was a stray and because THE HUMANE SOCIETY found him as already
being neutered and declawed, he was probably abandoned by his previous
owner.

2) If I want a cat, while living here, I am required to own one that is
spayed/neutered and declawed and am required to provide documentation
from the Humane Society or a Vet on top of paying a very hefty deposit
for having a cat. This is normal for most complexes here. I don't know
about where you live.

I am a cat lover who has grown up around cats (my mother always had
cats) and I personally had owned a previous cat for 17 years. I had to
put to him sleep due to suffering in his old age as he couldn't get up
without being in pain and had no control of his bowels/bladder and
before you jump me for putting the cat to sleep, the vet who had
treated him since he was a kitten, had said that it was for the best as
my cat was in pain and was suffering....This was heartbreaking for me!

I really missed and wanted another cat, but my trip to the Humane
Society was to help my brother pick out a dog for his house and I just
was looking at the cats while my brother was waiting for one of the
dogs to be brought to the "Meet & Greet" room; not planning on getting
one....

Since this cat was already declawed and already neutered and was half
price as the humane society had an extremely large number of cats, I
felt for this cat, wanted to give him a loving home and so he was
perfect for my situation.

I don't personally agree with declawing and could care less about my
furniture. Even if he still had his claws, he's never bothered any of
my furniture...At least he doesn't paw at it...My cat knows he's well
loved and he is well treated, even if he can be a pain in the rear at
times.

Jill
January 3rd 07, 07:21 AM
Believe me, I'm a very heavy sleeper and it wakes me up. I have to
have four alarms (2 on my cell phone and I also have a dual setting
alarm clock) to make sure I get up on time in the morning (I know
ridiculous). I wouldn't think it would be noisy either.
Unfortunately, these are apartment complex "as cheap as we can get them
so we have more funds to build more apartments", crappy, hollow doors.
Not only does the door rattle when he's pawing at it, it seems the
hollow doors amply the noise...The noise is not as loud when its the
entry way door, but when its one of the closets or my bedroom
door...Well, its something you'd actually have to hear to believe...Its
like someone is holding a megaphone up to another person using
sandpaper. I'm not worried about damage to the doors at all :).
Thanks all for your advice....

I'm looking forward to getting to know everyone here.....

Cheryl wrote:
> On Tue 02 Jan 2007 08:22:01p, cardarch wrote in
> rec.pets.cats.health+behav
> ups.com>:
>
> >
> > If he has no claws and so cannot damage the doors he wishes to
> > open then he cant be making much noise so you could just keep
> > some earplugs next to your bed and insert them into your ear
> > canals when ever he makes this little racket.
>
> Thank you. You have the best point of all! How noisy can it be to
> have a declawed cat pawing at a door? I've never had a declawed cat,
> so it didn't occur to me that it can't be at all noisy. My gang is
> noisy at everything they do, so nothing fazes me any more.
>
> --
> Cheryl

Jill
January 3rd 07, 07:58 AM
ARGH, I'm glad I got a brief nap in and don't have to be up in the
morning, but I'm finding all sorts of errors after reading my own
post....Lets correct these before I get a comment about understanding
the english language.

Jill wrote:
> whether you felt I wasn't clear or not with my
> statement, it is no excuse to say horrible things to someone who is new
> to this group and was looking for advice from fellow cat lovers.

This should be: "Whether you felt I was or was not clear with my
statement"....

>If I had him declawed and neutered personally, I would have said, "Since I owned him
> I have had him declawed and neutered".

This should be "Since I have owned him, I have had him........."

> I really missed and wanted another cat, but my trip to the Humane
> Society was to help my brother pick out a dog for his house and I just
> was looking at the cats while my brother was waiting for one of the
> dogs to be brought to the "Meet & Greet" room; not planning on getting
> one....

This should be "I really missed my cat and wanted another cat"......

Cat Psychologist
January 3rd 07, 10:52 AM
Jill wrote:
> Believe me, I'm a very heavy

that's ok, alot of people are

have you tried doing a mind job on the cat yet?

crawl around on your hands and knees and bark like a dog

keep barking till the cat goes away

nay
January 3rd 07, 03:17 PM
ha ha ah ha ha ha ha, effing hell?! cat fight?! grreeoouuwww !!!!!
hisssss !!!

lets just agree that we all love our cats and that we will never do
anything to harm them (not knowingly anyway) be nice to each other
kitty catties....think of tuna and sunshine. purrrrrrrrrrr!!!!

Nay

Charlie Wilkes wrote:
> On 2 Jan 2007 15:05:18 -0800, "bookie" >
> wrote:
>
> >
> >Jill wrote:
> >> Bookie, he was already declawed when I got him from the humane society.
> >> I asked for help, not a nasty response about declawing....So RUDE!
> >
> >like i said to you personally, your message implied that he had been
> >declawed whilst in your care
>
> I didn't read it that way.
>
> >and therefore it would appear to myself,
> >and many others reading, that you had been responsible for this
> >declawing, so what the hell do you expect me to say? be clearer in your
> >posting in future especially when referring to declawing or you will
> >get a sharp response from myself and a fair few other people on the
> >matter (am I the only person here who can actually read English?)
> >
> >I am not apologising for someone else's inability to communicate
> >correctly
>
> She communicates just fine. You went off half-cocked and made
> yourself look like a sanctimonious twit.
>
> Charlie

Spot
January 3rd 07, 11:18 PM
Jill,

Get yourself a laser pointer and see if he will chase it around. I used to
have problems with Spot keeping me up at night playing and I found the
solution was to tire her out so she was ready to sleep. For months about 20
minutes before I was ready for bed I would dart it all around the room and
she'd go nuts chasing after it. To really play her out I would run it up
and down the stair way and about a dozen times. My other two cats could
care less and didn't mess with it but she loved it. I still get it out once
in a while and play with her.

Good Luck
Celeste




"Jill" > wrote in message
ps.com...
> Believe me, I'm a very heavy sleeper and it wakes me up. I have to
> have four alarms (2 on my cell phone and I also have a dual setting
> alarm clock) to make sure I get up on time in the morning (I know
> ridiculous). I wouldn't think it would be noisy either.
> Unfortunately, these are apartment complex "as cheap as we can get them
> so we have more funds to build more apartments", crappy, hollow doors.
> Not only does the door rattle when he's pawing at it, it seems the
> hollow doors amply the noise...The noise is not as loud when its the
> entry way door, but when its one of the closets or my bedroom
> door...Well, its something you'd actually have to hear to believe...Its
> like someone is holding a megaphone up to another person using
> sandpaper. I'm not worried about damage to the doors at all :).
> Thanks all for your advice....
>
> I'm looking forward to getting to know everyone here.....
>
> Cheryl wrote:
>> On Tue 02 Jan 2007 08:22:01p, cardarch wrote in
>> rec.pets.cats.health+behav
>> ups.com>:
>>
>> >
>> > If he has no claws and so cannot damage the doors he wishes to
>> > open then he cant be making much noise so you could just keep
>> > some earplugs next to your bed and insert them into your ear
>> > canals when ever he makes this little racket.
>>
>> Thank you. You have the best point of all! How noisy can it be to
>> have a declawed cat pawing at a door? I've never had a declawed cat,
>> so it didn't occur to me that it can't be at all noisy. My gang is
>> noisy at everything they do, so nothing fazes me any more.
>>
>> --
>> Cheryl
>

Rhonda
January 4th 07, 06:34 AM
Lynne wrote:
> on Wed, 03 Jan 2007 04:41:03 GMT, Rhonda > wrote:
>
>>I would have asked her first.
>
> But you are a reasonable person...

Thanks -- your check is in the mail... :)

Rhonda

jenniek
January 4th 07, 01:16 PM
Jill wrote:
> 1) He was a stray and because THE HUMANE SOCIETY found him as already
> being neutered and declawed, he was probably abandoned by his previous
> owner.

I have a cat that was given to me by one of the owners two years ago.
When the woman gave me the cat, she told me that one of the reasons
that she was letting him go was because her husband "didn't get along
with the cat". She was also nice enough to give me the name of
Chinook's vet, whom I contacted immediately and discovered that "didn't
get along" was just another way of saying that he was abusing the hell
out of this poor thing.

Nook does the same thing that your cat does, Jill. Every morning, at
between 3-4am, he goes through my apartment and scratches at all the
closed doors (he is not declawed). At first, I thought that he did this
just to drive me crazy. Once I have gotten up and opened the door that
he's attacking, he leaves it alone and goes to the next one. As well,
the few times that I have had to close him up in a room (i.e. when I
was moving and trying to keep him out of the way from the movers) he
freaked out, crying and scratching everything, and it was days before
he calmed down again.

After speaking to the vet about it, she and I have started to wonder if
perhaps Nook spent a lot of time locked up at night when he was in the
care of his previous owners. She has determined that Nook has an
almost-phobia about closed doors, because he has spent time on the
other side of them, and that he needs all doors to be open. Luckily for
me, I live in a small one-bedroom apartment, so there aren't that many
doors to begin with. Every night, though, I go through my place and
make sure that all the closet doors are cracked open just a little. He
is quite happy to know that he can get in them if he wants, and I get
to sleep through the night. I just thought I would throw this out there
as a possible reason for why your cat is behaving this way.

Cat Psychologist
January 4th 07, 03:19 PM
Rhonda wrote:

> Thanks -- your check is in the mail... :)
>
> Rhonda

me tooo! I want some money

I think you're Very responsible

this is michael jackson
( o
: = )
( o

notice the two air holes where you would normally see a nose

Rhonda
January 4th 07, 03:31 PM
Cat Psychologist wrote:
> Rhonda wrote:
>
>
>>Thanks -- your check is in the mail... :)
>>
>>Rhonda
>
>
> me tooo! I want some money
>
> I think you're Very responsible
>
> this is michael jackson
> ( o
> : = )
> ( o
>
> notice the two air holes where you would normally see a nose

That's scary -- but I recognized him in your artwork immediately.

Rhonda

Cat Psychologist
January 5th 07, 01:39 AM
Matthew wrote:
> Bookie DID YOU BOTHER TO ASK IF THEY DECLAWED HIM? You jumped the gun
>
> I have done shelter and rescue work just like a lot of us out here have. Do
> know how many furballs are brought in declawed. The shelter adopted them
> out just like the other rescues.
>
> Yes declawing is a sick process and totally barbaric unless medical
> necessary but you can't believe how many people don't know what is involved
> in it. IMO it should be outlawed everywhere but you can assume everyone
> that has a declawed cat DID it to the cat.

it wasn't till the past 80 years that women began to get the respect
they deserved

you know the virginia slims motto, "you've come a long way baby"
(some cute blonde smoking a cigarette)...

now women are educators, senators, doctors and things

us guys think we are slick, we're like kids

bookie
January 5th 07, 02:31 AM
> now women are educators, senators, doctors and things
>
I think that women have been educators and doctors of sorts for a long
time, comes with the territory of being a mother doesn't it? they also
have to be cooks, politicians, nurses, chauffeurs, counsellors,
personal trainers, cleaners, seamstresses, project managers,
accountants, strategy consultants, waste disposal experts, diplomats,
etc etc I could go on, but it is just that they have never been
recognised or properly paid for all the jobs that your average
mother/woman has to do to get by with kids in tow.

and now on top that we are expected to hold down full time jobs too,
and this is supposed to show that we are free? mmmm.... not so sure

Cat Psychologist
January 5th 07, 03:01 AM
bookie wrote:

> and now on top that we are expected to hold down full time jobs too

well lets get with it, make that money
money is freedom

Like Charlio said, do something else...

can you hook?

CatNipped
January 5th 07, 11:19 PM
"Jill" > wrote in message
oups.com...
> ARGH, I'm glad I got a brief nap in and don't have to be up in the
> morning, but I'm finding all sorts of errors after reading my own
> post....Lets correct these before I get a comment about understanding
> the english language.

No, Jill, please don't feel you have to. Flaming typos and grammatical
errors on UseNet is the epitome of uncouth - the lamest of the lame resort
to that (like when someone has accused someone else of something they didn't
do and then they resort to "well it was your fault for not writing
grammatically" instead of just apologizing).

Typos happen, and most civilized people realize this and accept that nobody
is perfect. I'm sorry you're feeling defensive about your posts - you
shouldn't have to, this is an informal group *supposedly* created to offer
advice and support about cats' health and behavior.

Hugs,

CatNipped

>
> Jill wrote:
>> whether you felt I wasn't clear or not with my
>> statement, it is no excuse to say horrible things to someone who is new
>> to this group and was looking for advice from fellow cat lovers.
>
> This should be: "Whether you felt I was or was not clear with my
> statement"....
>
>>If I had him declawed and neutered personally, I would have said, "Since I
>>owned him
>> I have had him declawed and neutered".
>
> This should be "Since I have owned him, I have had him........."
>
>> I really missed and wanted another cat, but my trip to the Humane
>> Society was to help my brother pick out a dog for his house and I just
>> was looking at the cats while my brother was waiting for one of the
>> dogs to be brought to the "Meet & Greet" room; not planning on getting
>> one....
>
> This should be "I really missed my cat and wanted another cat"......
>

CatNipped
January 5th 07, 11:27 PM
"Jill" > wrote in message
ps.com...
> Hello, I have had my cat from over a year now. He's been declawed and
> neutered since I've owned him. He's never been affectionate towards me
> expect when I first come home from work (and thats for about 5 mins).
>
> Over the last 4 days, he's taken on a bad and very frustrating/annoying
> behavior. Every late night/early morning (I'm talking about 3 or 4
> am), he starts pawing on the closet door until he wakes me up then he
> runs and hides. If he had claws it would be like he's sharpening his
> claws in turbo mode.
>
> The first time, he ran out into the kitchen where his bowl was and I
> saw he was low on food and water so I topped his bowl off, thinking
> that was his way of saying I'm hungry, then laid back down. About 20
> mins later, he started it again. I sat up, he ran and hid. This will
> continue until I'm up for the day; every 10 to 15 mins he's pawing a
> door to wake me back up.
>
> If it was just the one closet door, I'd think there was something in
> there he wanted. However, I moved his carrier in front of the door, so
> he then moved to the 2nd closet door. If I shut him out of the
> bedroom, he paws the bedroom door until I wake up and let him in. If I
> move out to try and sleep on my living room couch, he paws the front
> door or the entry way coat closet door.
>
> I've tried everything from giving him a light swat on the butt and
> telling him no TO tossing a shoe at the wall near him (NOT at him, to
> try and scare him away from the door; he runs, but comes back a few
> mins later) TO putting him in his carrier (which he just paws at the
> carrier door which is more annoying)....
>
> I don't know what else to try, but I'm EXHAUSTED after being woken up
> constantly...He doesn't like to play during waking hours and again he's
> not an affectionate cat (very independent).
>
> Can anyone suggest another idea? I'd love to get some sleep tonight.

I have a cat that does that, but not as persistently. I think it's just
that some cats hate a closed door and want to see what's on the other side.
Possibly, as some people have suggested, there might be a mouse or insect
that the cat is trying to get to to "do his job".

Lastly, whenever a cat (or any pet) starts a new behavior or changes an old
one, it's never bad advice to speak to your vet about it. Cats can be very
stoic about pain and can find many strange ways to let their human know that
something is bothering them.

Hugs,

CatNipped

CatNipped
January 5th 07, 11:39 PM
"Rhonda" > wrote in message
...
> Jill,
>
> I think it's not about the door at all -- it's about getting your
> attention. The first time he was trying to tell you about the food and
> water and he saw that waking you up resulted into a positive cat
> experience (food!). Now it's more or less a habit and he's going to try
> for your attention.
>
> That's my take on it, anyway.
>
> If that is the case, the only way I know to stop it is to ignore him. I
> know that will be tough, but maybe the earplug idea someone mentioned
> would work.
>
> The other thing you might do is get him a playmate and let them tear
> around the house together at 4am like any self-respecting cat. He may
> forget trying to get your attention, but you may be awakened by thunder
> paws through the house.

Man, is that ever true! I was woken up at 2:00AM the other morning by what
sounded like someone kicking in the back door then running around upstairs
in army boots. Nope, it was just Sammy and Jessie having a fun game of
chase! ;>

Hugs,

CatNipped

> Rhonda
>
> Jill wrote:
>> Over the last 4 days, he's taken on a bad and very frustrating/annoying
>> behavior. Every late night/early morning (I'm talking about 3 or 4
>> am), he starts pawing on the closet door until he wakes me up then he
>> runs and hides. If he had claws it would be like he's sharpening his
>> claws in turbo mode.
>>
>> The first time, he ran out into the kitchen where his bowl was and I
>> saw he was low on food and water so I topped his bowl off, thinking
>> that was his way of saying I'm hungry, then laid back down. About 20
>> mins later, he started it again. I sat up, he ran and hid. This will
>> continue until I'm up for the day; every 10 to 15 mins he's pawing a
>> door to wake me back up.

bookie
January 6th 07, 02:56 AM
Cat Psychologist wrote:
> bookie wrote:
>
> > and now on top that we are expected to hold down full time jobs too
>
> well lets get with it, make that money
> money is freedom
>
> Like Charlio said, do something else...
>
> can you hook?

no but i did used to play as scrum half when i was at uni, not keen on
a forward position