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Cat Psychologist
January 3rd 07, 01:57 AM
personally I wish you and sheelagh would go back to showing your butts

did ya'll plan your entrance? or was that happenstance

cybercat
January 3rd 07, 02:00 AM
"Cat Psychologist" > wrote in message
ups.com...
> personally I wish you and sheelagh would go back to showing your butts
>
> did ya'll plan your entrance? or was that happenstance
>

They really are kind of like bookends, aren't they? In a way ....

sheelagh
January 3rd 07, 03:28 AM
Cat Psychologist wrote:

> personally I wish you and sheelagh would go back to showing your butts
Good evening Big B.

Now why would that be?

> did ya'll plan your entrance? or was that happenstance

Happenstance I would believe,lol
S:o)

sheelagh
January 3rd 07, 03:31 AM
cybercat wrote:
> "Cat Psychologist" > wrote in message
> ups.com...
> > personally I wish you and sheelagh would go back to showing your butts
Nah...I don't do angry anymore...Nice Is far nicer ...
> > did ya'll plan your entrance? or was that happenstance

Total happenstance, I assure you..Did you miss us?

> They really are kind of like bookends, aren't they? In a way ....

Do you mean proping both ends up lol???
S:o)

bookie
January 3rd 07, 04:33 AM
Cat Psychologist wrote:
> personally I wish you and sheelagh would go back to showing your butts
>
> did ya'll plan your entrance? or was that happenstance

bless you! you missed me didn't you?

Cat Psychologist
January 3rd 07, 09:34 AM
bookie wrote:

> bless you! you missed me didn't you?

<nodding my head>

yeah, you seemed quiet, a little too quiet, it made me think you might
be up to no good?

im up lighting a second oil heater, you would call it a parafin heater,
but it's the same thing.
what a nice difference it makes, it's the differnce of HOT and just ok
in here.
I like it hot, I can always fan the door, or open the window a little
wider

I like a heater where you can back your iss up and warm your buns
i don't like these wimpy central heat units, you can' t find a warm
spot in the house

Happy new year

cp

sheelagh
January 3rd 07, 09:37 AM
bookie wrote:
> Cat Psychologist wrote:
> > personally I wish you and sheelagh would go back to showing your butts
> >
> > did ya'll plan your entrance? or was that happenstance
>
> bless you! you missed me didn't you?
Bookie

Of course he did lol .It is our quintessential sense of humour....
Or perhaps it is our droll witty sense of humour...?

Or possibly It because we stood upto that dual personality chap that
hasn't been taking his medication, forgot what bugger off means,lol
I can't say that I blame him either..He who shall not be named but
feels the need to be known for his wonderful name with the implication
that he skins bunny's...
Do have a look @ It's profile & topics.Mat suggested that I did, & I
can assure you that It is quite interesting.It certainly gave us a
laugh....
S;o)

It would seem that you were spot on about the medication, or the lack
of it in this instance

Of course he misses us, lol
S;o)

sheelagh
January 3rd 07, 09:48 AM
Cat Psychologist wrote:
> bookie wrote:
>
> > bless you! you missed me didn't you?
>
> <nodding my head>

He He,I thought you might be...you see we are quite good fun after
all,hey?

> yeah, you seemed quiet, a little too quiet, it made me think you might
> be up to no good?
I wa s up to no good lol,It just took some containing

> im up lighting a second oil heater, you would call it a parafin heater,
> but it's the same thing.
Is It very cold where you are ?
> what a nice difference it makes, it's the differnce of HOT and just ok
> in here.
Do the pussy cats like it too?

How are they btw? No more chuck ups I hope?

> I like it hot, I can always fan the door, or open the window a little
> wider

> I like a heater where you can back your iss up and warm your buns
> i don't like these wimpy central heat units, you can' t find a warm
> spot in the house

Cats tend to like warm spots too.When I light the fire, all of the cats
seem to come out of their cubby holes, just so that they can lie on the
fire side rug, doing the dying fly in front of the fire.

He ,or she that comes first, gets prime place in front of it..
Mind you, If one of the logs starts spitting on it, they Jump out of
the way hastily, just in case one of the bits make it through the fire
gaurd lol
> Happy new year
>
> cp
Happy new year to you too
S;o)

Cat Psychologist
January 3rd 07, 10:08 AM
sheelagh wrote:
> Cat Psychologist wrote:

> > did ya'll plan your entrance? or was that happenstance
>
> Happenstance I would believe,lol
> S:o)

well your timing is good

hopefully you won't encounter any more... shall we say inconveniences,
yes

I also love reading about teen behavior, I love hearing what families
are up to

Ime ane olde blinde man, people laughe at me, but I always finde them
withe my cane
I can smelle their feare

far as "chatting", I can hang with the best of them, lol

you should see me swapping recipes on rec.food.cooking
I seen you post over there. lol

you're the perfect cat, just set out and do what you like

you and bookie are cats see

your tales and youth remind me of the broadway musical, Cats

A local high school put it on, they did an awesome job!
It was also the first time the play was liscensed to be
performed by other play-groups - Imagine that!

have you ever seen Murials Wedding?
that's what I picture with you and bookie

Have a nice day

cp

bookie
January 3rd 07, 02:26 PM
Cat Psychologist wrote:
> bookie wrote:
>
> > bless you! you missed me didn't you?
>
> <nodding my head>
>
> yeah, you seemed quiet, a little too quiet, it made me think you might
> be up to no good?
>
> im up lighting a second oil heater, you would call it a parafin heater,
> but it's the same thing.
> what a nice difference it makes, it's the differnce of HOT and just ok
> in here.
> I like it hot, I can always fan the door, or open the window a little
> wider
>
> I like a heater where you can back your iss up and warm your buns
> i don't like these wimpy central heat units, you can' t find a warm
> spot in the house
>
> Happy new year
>
> cp

I have not been well past couple of days, flu or something, and now
jessie has gone awol and i have to go out and we have no cat flap so i
cannot just got out and leave her locked out cos it looks like it is
going to rain any second and i am worried about her being locked out in
awful weather. mayeb she is hiding in a the bottom of a cupboard
somewhere.
make sure you are careful with those oil heaters, don't start a fire
and end up with singed kittens.

personally have radiators which jessie loves stretching out underneath,
anmd i can sit with my back leaning on them to get really warm. I am
considering gettign a radiator bed/hammock thing but i am wondering
whether cats really use them, any experience with them?

thank god christmas is over

Cat Psychologist
January 3rd 07, 03:30 PM
bookie wrote:

> thank god christmas is over

baaa humbug! you got a hangover

yeah, I take a little pride in my heaters
Im the wick expert around these parts

sorry you're not feeling well

have you tried gatorade and peaches?

whens the last time you sat down to a big home cooked meal?
that's what you need

in the meantime, try keep your head, feet and hands warm

<wrapping a bright green scarf around bookies neck, handing her a bag
lunch and sending her out the door>

I always wanted to do that

:

sheelagh
January 4th 07, 01:25 AM
bookie wrote:
> Cat Psychologist wrote:
> > bookie wrote:
> >
> > > bless you! you missed me didn't you?
> >
> > <nodding my head>
> >
> > yeah, you seemed quiet, a little too quiet, it made me think you might
> > be up to no good?
> >
> > im up lighting a second oil heater, you would call it a parafin heater,
> > but it's the same thing.
> > what a nice difference it makes, it's the differnce of HOT and just ok
> > in here.
> > I like it hot, I can always fan the door, or open the window a little
> > wider
> >
> > I like a heater where you can back your iss up and warm your buns
> > i don't like these wimpy central heat units, you can' t find a warm
> > spot in the house
> >
> > Happy new year
> >
> > cp
>
> I have not been well past couple of days, flu or something, and now
> jessie has gone awol and i have to go out and we have no cat flap so i
> cannot just got out and leave her locked out cos it looks like it is
> going to rain any second and i am worried about her being locked out in
> awful weather. mayeb she is hiding in a the bottom of a cupboard
> somewhere.
Oh Bookie, I knew there was something Up~Most unlike you not to put in
a regular appearance.What *you need* Is a rather large box of Lem sips
& ultra soft tissues, as well as a decent totty at bed time.

I'm really sorry to read about Jessie.I do hope that you have found her
now?
I worry when my gang arn't In too, if we need to go out.

We recently had Upvc windows and doors fitted because they all
desperately needed replacing so we thought that we would go for
something that would last for a few years.In haste I fear.. .I forgot
to take into consideration that we can't fit a cat flip into any of
them.Actually, I was wondering If anyone has ever tried fitting one
into a glass window before?It must be possible as long as you know what
you are doing?I need to fit at least one in so that the go - outer crew
can get indoors when It is tipping it down.Presently, I'm leaving the
shed open so that there is at least some shelter for them, but It Is
hardly Ideal.When we get another cold snap, I would rather know that
they can make It indoors so that they can spread out under the
radiators or In their beds
..
> make sure you are careful with those oil heaters, don't start a fire
> and end up with singed kittens.

Very true. B,Can you get a fire that we refer to as a Super Ser?
It Is a mobile Gas fire that you can move from room to room should you
wish to.It has a gas bottle inside that you can turn on and off when
you need to?It also helps with cold bum syndrome too-Don't forget to
leave a crack open In one of your windows.You need to be aware that
carbon monoxide is just as poisinous to the Mogg's as It Is to
you.Silent & deadly stuff that Is!
A Sper Ser Is slightly more safe that a parrafin heater I think.

> personally have radiators which jessie loves stretching out underneath,
> anmd i can sit with my back leaning on them to get really warm. I am
> considering gettign a radiator bed/hammock thing but i am wondering
> whether cats really use them, any experience with them?

Same here.Gas central heating,& I still have the open fire in the
living room.I couldn't bare to part with it, But It is nice to have the
back up Gas, so that you don't have to go & clear It all out before
lighting It & there being warmth for us all.To be perfectly honest, It
is a bit of a pain in the butt , having to clear It out.All worth It on
a cold freezing evening, especially with an Iron fork to make toast
with.

The radiator beds that you mention are absolutely brilliant Bookie.In
fact the only down side Is that they can't take over 3cats at the same
time.. once they realise that one of the cats is in one, they all want
to get in.
I got another 2 for xmas & I have located them in several parts of the
house so that they have a choice of radiators to choose from now.Well
worth the money.Try Argos for both Cat flap's & radiator beds.They have
quite a range at incredibly reasonable prices.Go for a stronger one
than a more cheaply priced one.It pays you to..

> thank god christmas is over

Hear hear, only one more birthday to go, then a break from the endless
money pit:(
I am determind to start xmas gift buying in January this year.
I feel a bit of the hum bug fever too, but with younger children, It
would be wrong of me to inflict my personal feelings about It on them.
The true meaning of xmas does seem to have lost It's true meaning, &
has become so commericalised!But then again, half of my problem Is self
Inflicted because I leave It until the last possible moment before
taking off like a woman with too much purpose, with too little money.
I do hope that you feel better soon Bookie.Are you back to work this
week?My lot are going back to school tomorrow <heaving a sigh of
relife>
S;o)

bookie
January 5th 07, 01:28 AM
sheelagh wrote:
> bookie wrote:
> > Cat Psychologist wrote:
> > > bookie wrote:
> > >
> > > > bless you! you missed me didn't you?
> > >
> > > <nodding my head>
> > >
> > > yeah, you seemed quiet, a little too quiet, it made me think you might
> > > be up to no good?
> > >
> > > im up lighting a second oil heater, you would call it a parafin heater,
> > > but it's the same thing.
> > > what a nice difference it makes, it's the differnce of HOT and just ok
> > > in here.
> > > I like it hot, I can always fan the door, or open the window a little
> > > wider
> > >
> > > I like a heater where you can back your iss up and warm your buns
> > > i don't like these wimpy central heat units, you can' t find a warm
> > > spot in the house
> > >
> > > Happy new year
> > >
> > > cp
> >
> > I have not been well past couple of days, flu or something, and now
> > jessie has gone awol and i have to go out and we have no cat flap so i
> > cannot just got out and leave her locked out cos it looks like it is
> > going to rain any second and i am worried about her being locked out in
> > awful weather. mayeb she is hiding in a the bottom of a cupboard
> > somewhere.
> Oh Bookie, I knew there was something Up~Most unlike you not to put in
> a regular appearance.What *you need* Is a rather large box of Lem sips
> & ultra soft tissues, as well as a decent totty at bed time.
>
> I'm really sorry to read about Jessie.I do hope that you have found her
> now?
> I worry when my gang arn't In too, if we need to go out.
>
> We recently had Upvc windows and doors fitted because they all
> desperately needed replacing so we thought that we would go for
> something that would last for a few years.In haste I fear.. .I forgot
> to take into consideration that we can't fit a cat flip into any of
> them.Actually, I was wondering If anyone has ever tried fitting one
> into a glass window before?It must be possible as long as you know what
> you are doing?I need to fit at least one in so that the go - outer crew
> can get indoors when It is tipping it down.Presently, I'm leaving the
> shed open so that there is at least some shelter for them, but It Is
> hardly Ideal.When we get another cold snap, I would rather know that
> they can make It indoors so that they can spread out under the
> radiators or In their beds
> .
> > make sure you are careful with those oil heaters, don't start a fire
> > and end up with singed kittens.
>
> Very true. B,Can you get a fire that we refer to as a Super Ser?
> It Is a mobile Gas fire that you can move from room to room should you
> wish to.It has a gas bottle inside that you can turn on and off when
> you need to?It also helps with cold bum syndrome too-Don't forget to
> leave a crack open In one of your windows.You need to be aware that
> carbon monoxide is just as poisinous to the Mogg's as It Is to
> you.Silent & deadly stuff that Is!
> A Sper Ser Is slightly more safe that a parrafin heater I think.
>
> > personally have radiators which jessie loves stretching out underneath,
> > anmd i can sit with my back leaning on them to get really warm. I am
> > considering gettign a radiator bed/hammock thing but i am wondering
> > whether cats really use them, any experience with them?
>
> Same here.Gas central heating,& I still have the open fire in the
> living room.I couldn't bare to part with it, But It is nice to have the
> back up Gas, so that you don't have to go & clear It all out before
> lighting It & there being warmth for us all.To be perfectly honest, It
> is a bit of a pain in the butt , having to clear It out.All worth It on
> a cold freezing evening, especially with an Iron fork to make toast
> with.
>
> The radiator beds that you mention are absolutely brilliant Bookie.In
> fact the only down side Is that they can't take over 3cats at the same
> time.. once they realise that one of the cats is in one, they all want
> to get in.
> I got another 2 for xmas & I have located them in several parts of the
> house so that they have a choice of radiators to choose from now.Well
> worth the money.Try Argos for both Cat flap's & radiator beds.They have
> quite a range at incredibly reasonable prices.Go for a stronger one
> than a more cheaply priced one.It pays you to..
>
> > thank god christmas is over
>
> Hear hear, only one more birthday to go, then a break from the endless
> money pit:(
> I am determind to start xmas gift buying in January this year.
> I feel a bit of the hum bug fever too, but with younger children, It
> would be wrong of me to inflict my personal feelings about It on them.
> The true meaning of xmas does seem to have lost It's true meaning, &
> has become so commericalised!But then again, half of my problem Is self
> Inflicted because I leave It until the last possible moment before
> taking off like a woman with too much purpose, with too little money.
> I do hope that you feel better soon Bookie.Are you back to work this
> week?My lot are going back to school tomorrow <heaving a sigh of
> relife>
> S;o)

I can't leave jessie out when I go out because we dont; have a cat flap
either so she woudl have no way to get back in and she is an old girl
and really should not be left outside when it is going to be cold (and
she might get into a fight with the big tabby and white bruiser from a
few doors up). Therefore I have to get her inside before I can close
all the doors and go out myself, usually she is good and comes when i
call her and she is usually not too far away, just got a bit frantic
this time.

Also cannot have a flap fitted as the back door is all double glazed
glass. I suppose could have a tunnel knocked into the back wall but
that is a bit extreme as we only rent the house (and I ahve read that
cat flaps are not the greatest of inventions when it comes to having a
secure house with no feline intruders to scare your own moggies). I
think that if you cut a whoel for a flap into a singel sheet of glass
(as we have in our back doors) it would weaken the pane of glass and be
no good at all. But someone i was cat sitting for this week has had a
tunnel knocked through the wall next to her glass patio doors and that
seesmto work for her 2 cats, a normal cat flap is fitted onthe outside
of it and it is lined with plastic tubing. She got a professional
builder into do it though so god knows how much it cost her.

anyway hopefully with the new term starting I will get some supply
work, have to wait until a few weeks into term when all the staff will
get ill and start going off sick and then i get called. Frustratign
when you only get paid for the days you actually go into a school so
you do not get paid any other time and you depend on there being a big
epidemic of flu or something so you can eanr enough money to pay bills.
it is not the way to live really. Still probably better than having a
permanant job in a school with all that bloody marking and prep and
kids aggro and parents giving you crap all the time and refusing to
accept that their darling child is actually a totally brain dead and
insolent little **** and oxygen thief who should have been shot at
birth, anything is better than having to deal all that **** again.
At least with supply I can just walk away at the end of the day and
dont; have to see the kids again ever (mostly).

question; do you think some people common here purely to be abusive to
others regardless of what the topic is to be discussed? sometimes I get
that impression, pretty sad really. don't they have other things in
their lives?

Bookie

Charlie Wilkes
January 5th 07, 02:28 AM
On 4 Jan 2007 16:28:25 -0800, "bookie" >
wrote:

>insolent little **** and oxygen thief who should have been shot at
>birth, anything is better than having to deal all that **** again.

Hmmm. I wonder if you aren't in the wrong line of work, bookie.
Maybe you could get a job working as a prison guard, or something else
that would allow you to express your personality without having to
face negative repercussions.

Charlie

bookie
January 5th 07, 02:53 AM
Charlie Wilkes wrote:
> On 4 Jan 2007 16:28:25 -0800, "bookie" >
> wrote:
>
> >insolent little **** and oxygen thief who should have been shot at
> >birth, anything is better than having to deal all that **** again.
>
> Hmmm. I wonder if you aren't in the wrong line of work, bookie.
> Maybe you could get a job working as a prison guard, or something else
> that would allow you to express your personality without having to
> face negative repercussions.
>
> Charlie

go into the average school straff room and you will hear all sorts of
opinions on the darling pupils being expressed and they make mine seem
tame by comparison. Until you have experienced for yourself what state
schools in britain in some of the bad areas have become you probably
won't believe some of the tales which come out of them. bad behaviour
and general lack of respect for themslevs or other people has grown
from total lack of back up from senior teachers (who themselves no
longer teach but instead tend to stay in their offices in some quiet
corner of the school from which they regularly issue forth dictats on
how the classroom teachers are supposed to do their jobs) and the
abandonment of any sanctions which teachers had in order to control the
kids (detentions, corporal punishment).

the result now is anarchy and slipping educational standards caused by
this total lack of control of the kids who themselves know that the
teachers have no sanctions left in place. Sanctions and discipline are
not just there to punish the 'bad' ones but also to make the whole
place safer and give a feeling of security to the 'good' ones.

personally i have lost count of the number of times I have been shoved
or hit by pupils, sworn out, told to '**** off' or similar. And before
you ask, I DO NOT respond to them in their language, whatever you may
think of me I always manage to maintain a degree of professionalism and
would not stoop to their level anyway. I would not want to give them
the satisfaction of knowing they have wound me up, so you develop a
very thick skin after a while and try not to take it personally.

the most frightening thing I read was about a female teacher, new to
the job (I forget the details, i think the school was in north londno
somewhere) who was raped by a boy pupil who hung around after school
one day. It was right at the start of the school year back in
september, she was sitting in her classroom marking books, must have
been about 4pm, and he came in, think he had a knife, and raped her. I
suspect that there have been more than just this occasion aruond the
country but the teachers in question may have been unwilling to report
it because they know that the pupil/rapist may well just claim that the
teacher forced themselves on the pupil and get the teacher to be viewed
as the perpetrator and not the victim when it should be the other way
round.

These days the pupils are always believed to be telling the truth
before any investigation has taken place and they know that when it is
their word against a teacher's that the pupils will win. This is
something that some of them have used in the past to 'get back' at
teachers they bear a grudge against; make an allegation of abuse of
whatever against disliked teacher, teacher is immediately suspended
until investigated, even when the teacher is found to be completely
innocent all that happens ot the pupils is a mild slap on the wrist
whilst the teacher's career is in tatters, no other school will employ
them, all because of a vicious false allegation which will stay on
their record for any other school to check.

kids are more conniving and devious than most people want to admit,
particularly in this country, I know from experience.

actually am thinking about accountancy, the work is dull but the salary
more than makes up for that after you qualify, and no kids or parents
to deal with

bookie
January 5th 07, 02:55 AM
bookie wrote:
> think that if you cut a whoel for a flap into a singel sheet of glass

can't believe I wrote that!!!! I meant HOLE not whole, gods it's late

Charlie Wilkes
January 5th 07, 04:01 AM
On 4 Jan 2007 17:53:14 -0800, "bookie" >
wrote:
>
>actually am thinking about accountancy, the work is dull but the salary
>more than makes up for that after you qualify, and no kids or parents
>to deal with

Sure. Accounting is a good line of work. There's no point struggling
to get a job you detest.

Charlie

bookie
January 5th 07, 07:52 PM
Charlie Wilkes wrote:
> On 4 Jan 2007 17:53:14 -0800, "bookie" >
> wrote:
> >
> >actually am thinking about accountancy, the work is dull but the salary
> >more than makes up for that after you qualify, and no kids or parents
> >to deal with
>
> Sure. Accounting is a good line of work. There's no point struggling
> to get a job you detest.
>
I agree, I tried accountancy when i first graduated but it wasn't for
me then, there was lots of extra study to do for professional exams and
all i wanted to do at the time was see the world and not have to
struggle through more exams, not after just finishing a degree anyway.
I am a lot more grounded and less bothered about keeping up a hectic
social life (well actually thanks to my chosen sport I have no social
life anymore to worry about) so am more likely to knuckle down to all
the after hours studying which is required to pass the exams for it.

do accountants in USA have to study for it and pass exams etc? here you
have to do so, and the courses have a very heavy workload and the exams
are quite tough so you can become ACA qualified (or whatever, i am sure
someone will correct me on that). It is worth it cos the salaries are
good, and the work does give you a general knowledge of business and
how it works, can be long hours depending on which of the firms you
work for and where inthe country you are based too (london firms are
most hardworking it seems from my friends who do it).

I often think about something which Confucius (apparantly) said; "find
a job you love and you will never work another day in your life" .
think about it, he was spot on. All I have to do now is find a job as a
professional cat cuddler.

Bookie

sheelagh
January 5th 07, 10:30 PM
>question; do you think some people common here purely to be abusive to
>others regardless of what the topic is to be discussed? sometimes I get
>that impression, pretty sad really. don't they have other things in
>their lives?
>bookie wrote:

Only one or two of them-But everyone knows who they are & does
everything possible to avoid them (Even me now that I know better.I
learnt this one the hard way ...as usual)...

> Charlie Wilkes wrote:
> > On 4 Jan 2007 16:28:25 -0800, "bookie" >
> > wrote:
> >
> > >insolent little **** and oxygen thief who should have been shot at
> > >birth, anything is better than having to deal all that **** again.
> >
> > Hmmm. I wonder if you aren't in the wrong line of work, bookie.
> > Maybe you could get a job working as a prison guard, or something else
> > that would allow you to express your personality without having to
> > face negative repercussions.
> >
> > Charlie
LOL
I can just imagine you reading this statement & shaking your head in
wonder.
Charlie, you need to meet these sad individuals & thier parents to
appreciate exactly what Bookie means.




> go into the average school straff room and you will hear all sorts of
> opinions on the darling pupils being expressed and they make mine seem
> tame by comparison. Until you have experienced for yourself what state
> schools in britain in some of the bad areas have become you probably
> won't believe some of the tales which come out of them. bad behaviour
> and general lack of respect for themslevs or other people has grown
> from total lack of back up from senior teachers (who themselves no
> longer teach but instead tend to stay in their offices in some quiet
> corner of the school from which they regularly issue forth dictates on
> how the classroom teachers are supposed to do their jobs) and the
> abandonment of any sanctions which teachers had in order to control the
> kids (detentions, corporal punishment).

> the result now is anarchy and slipping educational standards caused by
> this total lack of control of the kids who themselves know that the
> teachers have no sanctions left in place. Sanctions and discipline are
> not just there to punish the 'bad' ones but also to make the whole
> place safer and give a feeling of security to the 'good' ones.
This very true.I have 5kids all of whom are @ various levels in the
education system, & I have wittnesed some of the things that Bookie
tell's you, so I know that what she tells you is in fact true.
On this side of the pond,we use different words that you probably might
not understand.One of these terms is a word called *chav*.Have you
heard this word before?
It used to be a slang word, but has now been added to the Oxford
Consice Dictionary
It's connoation imply's that the individual child or children involved
are of a group that wear a certain type of sport's wear ,& that they
are the sort of child that feels a need to be involved with gangs, & to
prove themselves worthy of initiation or involvment.
Thier main objective is to be as disruptive in nature as
possible.Vandal orrientated & a general niusance.They are loud,
oportunistic,criminal minded & fear nothing, least of all a teacher or
any other authority that might be involved, including the police-In
fact recently we had a big news section that indidcated that they
particularly aspire to get a badge of particular honour to themselves,
to wear with pride it would seem.The name of this badge is an ASBO.
ASBO is shortend or abbreviated for it's real term Antisocial behaviour
order.An order such as this, is issued by a magistrate's court, where
they will have already recieved plenty of warnings to alter their
behaviour pior to receiving one.
Normally, an asbo is issued by them & has conditions attatched to it,
such as to refrain from going into certain areas where they have caused
trouble, & to avoid certain people;a bit like a restraining order that
you have.(I watch Judge Judy sometimes lol..).It also has a final
warning attatched to it, stating that if they break the rules, such as
curfew orders, then they must face the consequences, which is normally
a short stay at an youth offenders institution.The more often you do
it, the longer your sentence will be.
The only way that I can equate it, is with your gang culture nature in
the Usa.
They are real pests, & often the parents really don't care enough to
deal with the problem, which in most cases is related to thier own
nature and problems too.

> personally i have lost count of the number of times I have been shoved
> or hit by pupils, sworn out, told to '**** off' or similar. And before
> you ask, I DO NOT respond to them in their language, whatever you may
> think of me I always manage to maintain a degree of professionalism and
> would not stoop to their level anyway. I would not want to give them
> the satisfaction of knowing they have wound me up, so you develop a
> very thick skin after a while and try not to take it personally.

To do so in this instance would be like asking for the sack with no
hope of a reference.It is sad, but very true.
No one wants to admit responsibility for their behaviour.You do have to
be extreemly tolerant, or have the abitity to hit the shut down botton
when they start on you personally.

> the most frightening thing I read was about a female teacher, new to
> the job (I forget the details, i think the school was in north londno
> somewhere) who was raped by a boy pupil who hung around after school
> one day. It was right at the start of the school year back in
> september, she was sitting in her classroom marking books, must have
> been about 4pm, and he came in, think he had a knife, and raped her. I
> suspect that there have been more than just this occasion aruond the
> country but the teachers in question may have been unwilling to report
> it because they know that the pupil/rapist may well just claim that the
> teacher forced themselves on the pupil and get the teacher to be viewed
> as the perpetrator and not the victim when it should be the other way
> round.
I have read about this case too.It is frightening to think that a child
is capeable of doing such a terrible thing, but they do!!
Over here, there is a policy that anyone is innocent until proven
otherwise...but in reality, this is often not the case at all-as she
points out, some people are more equal than others, children being the
inclusion to the rule here.There was also another case where a
headmaster was stabbed for trying to stop a fight quite recently too.
I can appreciate why a teacher feels threatened & wouldn't want to make
a complaint against as child, because most parents tend to believe the
child 1st, then question the validity of the childs statement, which
sadly more often or not is just a story to get them out of the
proverbial ****!!

> These days the pupils are always believed to be telling the truth
> before any investigation has taken place and they know that when it is
> their word against a teacher's that the pupils will win. This is
> something that some of them have used in the past to 'get back' at
> teachers they bear a grudge against; make an allegation of abuse of
> whatever against disliked teacher, teacher is immediately suspended
> until investigated, even when the teacher is found to be completely
> innocent all that happens ot the pupils is a mild slap on the wrist
> whilst the teacher's career is in tatters, no other school will employ
> them, all because of a vicious false allegation which will stay on
> their record for any other school to check.

This is sadly true too.Once an allegation is made, It is almost
impossible to get away from the allegation, even when it is proved
beyhond reasonable doubt that they were in fact, telling the truth:(

> kids are more conniving and devious than most people want to admit,
> particularly in this country, I know from experience.

I *think* that in the Usa, that this is taken far more seriously over
there , than it is over here?
Where as trouble makers are routed out, & sent to more appropriate
"schools", enabling the teacher to achieve the other brighter childrens
true potential. A terrible shame, but true all the same I fear...
No wonder that we find ourselve's having to import more core workers
such as teachers, nurses, police ,firemen & doctors even.
Our kids go to university, then go abroad to get a decent job where
they will be appreciated, paid far more, & respected too-It is also an
excellent way of getting out of paying back the Enormouse loans that
college students have to take out to study at university as well.A
crying shame actually!

> actually am thinking about accountancy, the work is dull but the salary
> more than makes up for that after you qualify, and no kids or parents
> to deal with

My mother once came out with a statement that I have never forgotten.I
don't think that she realised that she has never made a truer
statement...It was, "well I blame the parents personally"...
It was sooo true!!!?
I would die of shame if my kids were like that.
S.

bookie
January 6th 07, 03:24 AM
sheelagh wrote:
> >question; do you think some people common here purely to be abusive to
> >others regardless of what the topic is to be discussed? sometimes I get
> >that impression, pretty sad really. don't they have other things in
> >their lives?
> >bookie wrote:
>
> Only one or two of them-But everyone knows who they are & does
> everything possible to avoid them (Even me now that I know better.I
> learnt this one the hard way ...as usual)...
>
> > Charlie Wilkes wrote:
> > > On 4 Jan 2007 16:28:25 -0800, "bookie" >
> > > wrote:
> > >
> > > >insolent little **** and oxygen thief who should have been shot at
> > > >birth, anything is better than having to deal all that **** again.
> > >
> > > Hmmm. I wonder if you aren't in the wrong line of work, bookie.
> > > Maybe you could get a job working as a prison guard, or something else
> > > that would allow you to express your personality without having to
> > > face negative repercussions.
> > >
> > > Charlie
> LOL
> I can just imagine you reading this statement & shaking your head in
> wonder.
> Charlie, you need to meet these sad individuals & thier parents to
> appreciate exactly what Bookie means.
>
>
>
>
> > go into the average school straff room and you will hear all sorts of
> > opinions on the darling pupils being expressed and they make mine seem
> > tame by comparison. Until you have experienced for yourself what state
> > schools in britain in some of the bad areas have become you probably
> > won't believe some of the tales which come out of them. bad behaviour
> > and general lack of respect for themslevs or other people has grown
> > from total lack of back up from senior teachers (who themselves no
> > longer teach but instead tend to stay in their offices in some quiet
> > corner of the school from which they regularly issue forth dictates on
> > how the classroom teachers are supposed to do their jobs) and the
> > abandonment of any sanctions which teachers had in order to control the
> > kids (detentions, corporal punishment).
>
> > the result now is anarchy and slipping educational standards caused by
> > this total lack of control of the kids who themselves know that the
> > teachers have no sanctions left in place. Sanctions and discipline are
> > not just there to punish the 'bad' ones but also to make the whole
> > place safer and give a feeling of security to the 'good' ones.
> This very true.I have 5kids all of whom are @ various levels in the
> education system, & I have wittnesed some of the things that Bookie
> tell's you, so I know that what she tells you is in fact true.
> On this side of the pond,we use different words that you probably might
> not understand.One of these terms is a word called *chav*.Have you
> heard this word before?
> It used to be a slang word, but has now been added to the Oxford
> Consice Dictionary
> It's connoation imply's that the individual child or children involved
> are of a group that wear a certain type of sport's wear ,& that they
> are the sort of child that feels a need to be involved with gangs, & to
> prove themselves worthy of initiation or involvment.
> Thier main objective is to be as disruptive in nature as
> possible.Vandal orrientated & a general niusance.They are loud,
> oportunistic,criminal minded & fear nothing, least of all a teacher or
> any other authority that might be involved, including the police-In
> fact recently we had a big news section that indidcated that they
> particularly aspire to get a badge of particular honour to themselves,
> to wear with pride it would seem.The name of this badge is an ASBO.
> ASBO is shortend or abbreviated for it's real term Antisocial behaviour
> order.An order such as this, is issued by a magistrate's court, where
> they will have already recieved plenty of warnings to alter their
> behaviour pior to receiving one.
> Normally, an asbo is issued by them & has conditions attatched to it,
> such as to refrain from going into certain areas where they have caused
> trouble, & to avoid certain people;a bit like a restraining order that
> you have.(I watch Judge Judy sometimes lol..).It also has a final
> warning attatched to it, stating that if they break the rules, such as
> curfew orders, then they must face the consequences, which is normally
> a short stay at an youth offenders institution.The more often you do
> it, the longer your sentence will be.
> The only way that I can equate it, is with your gang culture nature in
> the Usa.
> They are real pests, & often the parents really don't care enough to
> deal with the problem, which in most cases is related to thier own
> nature and problems too.
>
> > personally i have lost count of the number of times I have been shoved
> > or hit by pupils, sworn out, told to '**** off' or similar. And before
> > you ask, I DO NOT respond to them in their language, whatever you may
> > think of me I always manage to maintain a degree of professionalism and
> > would not stoop to their level anyway. I would not want to give them
> > the satisfaction of knowing they have wound me up, so you develop a
> > very thick skin after a while and try not to take it personally.
>
> To do so in this instance would be like asking for the sack with no
> hope of a reference.It is sad, but very true.
> No one wants to admit responsibility for their behaviour.You do have to
> be extreemly tolerant, or have the abitity to hit the shut down botton
> when they start on you personally.
>
> > the most frightening thing I read was about a female teacher, new to
> > the job (I forget the details, i think the school was in north londno
> > somewhere) who was raped by a boy pupil who hung around after school
> > one day. It was right at the start of the school year back in
> > september, she was sitting in her classroom marking books, must have
> > been about 4pm, and he came in, think he had a knife, and raped her. I
> > suspect that there have been more than just this occasion aruond the
> > country but the teachers in question may have been unwilling to report
> > it because they know that the pupil/rapist may well just claim that the
> > teacher forced themselves on the pupil and get the teacher to be viewed
> > as the perpetrator and not the victim when it should be the other way
> > round.
> I have read about this case too.It is frightening to think that a child
> is capeable of doing such a terrible thing, but they do!!
> Over here, there is a policy that anyone is innocent until proven
> otherwise...but in reality, this is often not the case at all-as she
> points out, some people are more equal than others, children being the
> inclusion to the rule here.There was also another case where a
> headmaster was stabbed for trying to stop a fight quite recently too.
> I can appreciate why a teacher feels threatened & wouldn't want to make
> a complaint against as child, because most parents tend to believe the
> child 1st, then question the validity of the childs statement, which
> sadly more often or not is just a story to get them out of the
> proverbial ****!!
>
> > These days the pupils are always believed to be telling the truth
> > before any investigation has taken place and they know that when it is
> > their word against a teacher's that the pupils will win. This is
> > something that some of them have used in the past to 'get back' at
> > teachers they bear a grudge against; make an allegation of abuse of
> > whatever against disliked teacher, teacher is immediately suspended
> > until investigated, even when the teacher is found to be completely
> > innocent all that happens ot the pupils is a mild slap on the wrist
> > whilst the teacher's career is in tatters, no other school will employ
> > them, all because of a vicious false allegation which will stay on
> > their record for any other school to check.
>
> This is sadly true too.Once an allegation is made, It is almost
> impossible to get away from the allegation, even when it is proved
> beyhond reasonable doubt that they were in fact, telling the truth:(
>
> > kids are more conniving and devious than most people want to admit,
> > particularly in this country, I know from experience.
>
> I *think* that in the Usa, that this is taken far more seriously over
> there , than it is over here?
> Where as trouble makers are routed out, & sent to more appropriate
> "schools", enabling the teacher to achieve the other brighter childrens
> true potential. A terrible shame, but true all the same I fear...
> No wonder that we find ourselve's having to import more core workers
> such as teachers, nurses, police ,firemen & doctors even.
> Our kids go to university, then go abroad to get a decent job where
> they will be appreciated, paid far more, & respected too-It is also an
> excellent way of getting out of paying back the Enormouse loans that
> college students have to take out to study at university as well.A
> crying shame actually!
>
> > actually am thinking about accountancy, the work is dull but the salary
> > more than makes up for that after you qualify, and no kids or parents
> > to deal with
>
> My mother once came out with a statement that I have never forgotten.I
> don't think that she realised that she has never made a truer
> statement...It was, "well I blame the parents personally"...
> It was sooo true!!!?
> I would die of shame if my kids were like that.
> S.

astounded that someone backs me up on this, most people seem to think
being a teacher is a doddle (don't know what planet they are on but not
the same one as me).
teachers are leaving the profession in droves, and the policy makers,
the politicians and the bigwigs in powers who don't actually know what
it is lie to work in a school, 'at the coalface' to coin a phrase, all
scratch their heads and wonder why. All they would have to do woudl be
to set up hidden cameras in a few classroom of your average secondary
school and watch some of these little c*nts in action, being abusive to
teachers and other pupils, being violent, disrupting lessons,
preventing me form doing my job and others from learning anything, and
it woudl be soon obvious why teachers are finding other careers. most
only stay inthe job about 3 years after they qualify now, then they
realise what a pile of **** it is, how poorly paid it is, that you are
treated like **** by senior teachers, parents and kids and leave to do
something where they are actually treated like a human being and paid
an appropriate amount for their hard work and qualifications.

i am gettign out now, i have had one nervous breakdown already due to
the utter ****ness of the job, I am not going to have another.

a few things which may need clarifying here though; chav, i think the
USA equivalent is 'trailer park trash'? if you have ever seen Little
Britain (comedy show, probably nto seen have you?) the character Vicky
Pollard is a perfect example, lives on council estate, already has had
a few kids, one of which she swapped for a Westlife cd, probably only
about 15 years old, wears chavvy kappa brand shiny tracksuits and
trashy white reebok trainers the whole time but saves her 'good
trainers' for court appearances (mostly for thieving offences), usually
found hanging around kiddies playgrounds, smoking and offering the
local boys 'favours' in return for drugs.

also thanks to the government, prob in a bid to save money on education
and redirect it into far nmore important things like more bombs or
refurbishing the main bar in the house of commons, we no longer have
special school or untis to send these horrible.. er... I mean
'challenged' kids. These schools have all been shut down under a policy
of 'inclusion' meaning that all the **** kids are now included
inmainstream schools where people who are not supported or trained in
how to deal with these little ****s have to try to cope with them as
they disrupt lessons and destroy the chances of any of the other kids
in classes with them of getting any sort of education as the teacher is
occupied full time with dealing with these morons unaided.

bookie

Charlie Wilkes
January 6th 07, 04:05 AM
On 5 Jan 2007 10:52:49 -0800, "bookie" >
wrote:

>
>Charlie Wilkes wrote:
>> On 4 Jan 2007 17:53:14 -0800, "bookie" >
>> wrote:
>> >
>> >actually am thinking about accountancy, the work is dull but the salary
>> >more than makes up for that after you qualify, and no kids or parents
>> >to deal with
>>
>> Sure. Accounting is a good line of work. There's no point struggling
>> to get a job you detest.
>>
>I agree, I tried accountancy when i first graduated but it wasn't for
>me then, there was lots of extra study to do for professional exams and
>all i wanted to do at the time was see the world and not have to
>struggle through more exams, not after just finishing a degree anyway.
>I am a lot more grounded and less bothered about keeping up a hectic
>social life (well actually thanks to my chosen sport I have no social
>life anymore to worry about) so am more likely to knuckle down to all

???

What is your sport, and how did it end your social life?


>the after hours studying which is required to pass the exams for it.
>
>do accountants in USA have to study for it and pass exams etc? here you

Yeah. In the U.S. we have Certified Public Accountants, the same as
your Chartered Accountants.

>have to do so, and the courses have a very heavy workload and the exams
>are quite tough so you can become ACA qualified (or whatever, i am sure
>someone will correct me on that). It is worth it cos the salaries are
>good, and the work does give you a general knowledge of business and
>how it works, can be long hours depending on which of the firms you
>work for and where inthe country you are based too (london firms are
>most hardworking it seems from my friends who do it).

If you go to work for an accounting firm, they'll encourage you to
seek promotions and thereby make a slave out of you, but you can also
work as an accountant for a business or hang out a shingle and do tax
returns.
>
>I often think about something which Confucius (apparantly) said; "find
>a job you love and you will never work another day in your life" .
>think about it, he was spot on. All I have to do now is find a job as a
>professional cat cuddler.

Somewhere in between is an occupation you might not "love," but at
least don't loathe, which seems to be how you feel about teaching.

Charlie

Cat Psychologist
January 6th 07, 04:07 AM
bookie wrote:
All I have to do now is find a job as a
> professional cat cuddler.

so you do hook, you just need a pimp

Charlie Wilkes
January 6th 07, 04:28 AM
On 5 Jan 2007 13:30:45 -0800, "sheelagh"
> wrote:
>
>My mother once came out with a statement that I have never forgotten.I
>don't think that she realised that she has never made a truer
>statement...It was, "well I blame the parents personally"...
>It was sooo true!!!?
>I would die of shame if my kids were like that.
>S.

Are you familiar with the poetry of Philip Larkin? He lived in Hull,
where he was a librarian with a somewhat lonely and threadbare life.
I think you and Bookie would both enjoy his work.

Your description of teenagers in the U.K. makes me think of "A
Clockwork Orange," a book by Anthony Burgess (I think) that was made
into a movie directed by Stanley Kubrick.

Charlie

sheelagh
January 6th 07, 08:29 AM
Cat Psychologist wrote:
> bookie wrote:
> All I have to do now is find a job as a
> > professional cat cuddler.
>
> so you do hook, you just need a pimp

Tske Tske Tske,
Your only supposed to be picky picky picky in cooking lol.
She meant in the litteral sense, silly........
S:o)

sheelagh
January 6th 07, 08:36 AM
Cat Psychologist wrote:
> bookie wrote:
> All I have to do now is find a job as a
> > professional cat cuddler.
>
> so you do hook, you just need a pimp

Tske Tske Tske,
Your only supposed to be picky picky picky in cooking lol.
She meant in the litteral sense, silly........
S:o)

Cat Psychologist
January 6th 07, 09:51 AM
Charlie Wilkes wrote:

> Your description of teenagers in the U.K. makes me think of "A
> Clockwork Orange," a book by Anthony Burgess (I think) that was made
> into a movie directed by Stanley Kubrick.
>
> Charlie

I've seen clockwork orange, I never figured out what it was about.

The teens in the UK?... That is surprising to me
why do I get the feeling the adults think it's cute?

sheelagh
January 6th 07, 10:17 AM
Charlie Wilkes wrote:
> On 5 Jan 2007 13:30:45 -0800, "sheelagh"
> > wrote:
> >
> >My mother once came out with a statement that I have never forgotten.I
> >don't think that she realised that she has never made a truer
> >statement...It was, "well I blame the parents personally"...
> >It was sooo true!!!?
> >I would die of shame if my kids were like that.
> >S.
>
> Are you familiar with the poetry of Philip Larkin? He lived in Hull,
> where he was a librarian with a somewhat lonely and threadbare life.
> I think you and Bookie would both enjoy his work.

To my shame,No-But I will try the library for that one.Bet you Bookie
has though!!!
Can't wait to try it though lol!!

> Your description of teenagers in the U.K. makes me think of "A
> Clockwork Orange," a book by Anthony Burgess (I think) that was made
> into a movie directed by Stanley Kubrick.

Not yet...I intend to see if I can get a copy of it today from the
local dvd/video library to see if they have one for me to watch.I have
heard of it though.If I remember rightly, I think that it might have
(****, cant remember his name-he was in fawlty tower though??)I will
let you know what I think afterwards too...
S;o)
> Charlie

Cat Psychologist
January 6th 07, 11:25 AM
sheelagh wrote:

> Not yet...I intend to see if I can get a copy of it today from the
> local dvd/video library to see if they have one for me to watch.I have
> heard of it though.If I remember rightly, I think that it might have
> (****, cant remember his name-he was in fawlty tower though??)I will
> let you know what I think afterwards too...
> S;o)

it's kind of weird, i've watched it at least 4 times, im clueless of
the plot




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sheelagh
January 6th 07, 02:36 PM
Cat Psychologist wrote:

> sheelagh wrote:
>
> > Not yet...I intend to see if I can get a copy of it today from the
> > local dvd/video library to see if they have one for me to watch.I have
> > heard of it though.If I remember rightly, I think that it might have
> > (****, cant remember his name-he was in fawlty tower though??)I will
> > let you know what I think afterwards too...
> > S;o)
>
> it's kind of weird, i've watched it at least 4 times, im clueless of
> the plot

John Cleese. that was the name of the guy in it I think?
Thinking back on it,I believe I have seen it-Iwas a long time ago,
around 18years or so.

I*think* have bigger fish to fry...

I'm not sure If you remember this, but a few weeks ago I was asking
whether to issolate my queen (Belle Ragdoll)?
I think I have a feeling it might have been a day or two, too
late.(talk about bolting the gate after the horse has bolted).
She is plump, has coral pink nipples, & I have a feeling I might be a
grandma very shortly.
I don't know whether to be delighted or horrified.
S.
It's not her fault, It is my fault, either way.

sheelagh
January 6th 07, 02:36 PM
Cat Psychologist wrote:

> sheelagh wrote:
>
> > Not yet...I intend to see if I can get a copy of it today from the
> > local dvd/video library to see if they have one for me to watch.I have
> > heard of it though.If I remember rightly, I think that it might have
> > (****, cant remember his name-he was in fawlty tower though??)I will
> > let you know what I think afterwards too...
> > S;o)
>
> it's kind of weird, i've watched it at least 4 times, im clueless of
> the plot

John Cleese. that was the name of the guy in it I think?
Thinking back on it,I believe I have seen it-Iwas a long time ago,
around 18years or so.

I*think* have bigger fish to fry...

I'm not sure If you remember this, but a few weeks ago I was asking
whether to issolate my queen (Belle Ragdoll)?
I think I have a feeling it might have been a day or two, too
late.(talk about bolting the gate after the horse has bolted).
She is plump, has coral pink nipples, & I have a feeling I might be a
grandma very shortly.
I don't know whether to be delighted or horrified.
S.
It's not her fault, It is my fault, either way.

Cat Psychologist
January 6th 07, 03:29 PM
sheelagh wrote:
>* have bigger fish to fry...
>
> I'm not sure If you remember this, but a few weeks ago I was asking
> whether to issolate my queen (Belle Ragdoll)?
> I think I have a feeling it might have been a day or two, too
> late.(talk about bolting the gate after the horse has bolted).
> She is plump, has coral pink nipples, & I have a feeling I might be a
> grandma very shortly.
> I don't know whether to be delighted or horrified.
> S.
> It's not her fault, It is my fault, either way.

dear God!

bookie
January 6th 07, 11:36 PM
Charlie Wilkes wrote:
> On 5 Jan 2007 13:30:45 -0800, "sheelagh"
> > wrote:
> >
> >My mother once came out with a statement that I have never forgotten.I
> >don't think that she realised that she has never made a truer
> >statement...It was, "well I blame the parents personally"...
> >It was sooo true!!!?
> >I would die of shame if my kids were like that.
> >S.
>
> Are you familiar with the poetry of Philip Larkin? He lived in Hull,
> where he was a librarian with a somewhat lonely and threadbare life.
> I think you and Bookie would both enjoy his work.

yes i am familiar with his work, he was also a bit of a ladies man too
as well as writing the now infamous line 'they **** you up your mum and
dad' (which is what i think you are referring to)
>
> Your description of teenagers in the U.K. makes me think of "A
> Clockwork Orange," a book by Anthony Burgess (I think) that was made
> into a movie directed by Stanley Kubrick.
>
yes it was anthony burgess who wrote a clockwork orange, he wrote it
based on his own experiences when his house was broken into by a gang
of delinquents, his wife raped and most of his possession stolen in the
process as he was kicked and beaten by the gang. He kind of
extrapolated the characters in the book from what he thought the
individual inthe gang were really like, their lives, histories, what
made them do it, their motivations. Certainly
as someone with a background in psychology I find the treatment of Alec
is very interesting although not sure that simliar conditioning would
be effective in all cases.

oddly enough i got bored with the film and fell asleep the first time i
watched it but the book held my interest much more (films and videos
tend o have a generally soporific effect on me anyway, i just have to
press 'play' onthe machine and i am asleep already)

unfortunately the portrayal of teenagers and disaffected youth by
mcdowell etc inthe film is not very far from the way the young of today
do behave in this country, terrible really, burgess probably did not
realise his work may actually be prophetic (although I have never been
hit over the head with a massive sculpture of a penis by one of them,
not yet anyway)

bookie
> Charlie

sheelagh
January 6th 07, 11:45 PM
Cat Psychologist wrote:
> sheelagh wrote:
> >* have bigger fish to fry...
> >
> > I'm not sure If you remember this, but a few weeks ago I was asking
> > whether to issolate my queen (Belle Ragdoll)?
> > I think I have a feeling it might have been a day or two, too
> > late.(talk about bolting the gate after the horse has bolted).
> > She is plump, has coral pink nipples, & I have a feeling I might be a
> > grandma very shortly.
> > I don't know whether to be delighted or horrified.
> > S.
> > It's not her fault, It is my fault, either way.
>
> dear God!

An extreem case of the pot calling the kettle black here;(
S.

bookie
January 7th 07, 12:00 AM
Cat Psychologist wrote:
> sheelagh wrote:
>
> > Not yet...I intend to see if I can get a copy of it today from the
> > local dvd/video library to see if they have one for me to watch.I have
> > heard of it though.If I remember rightly, I think that it might have
> > (****, cant remember his name-he was in fawlty tower though??)I will
> > let you know what I think afterwards too...
> > S;o)
>
er.... you are thinking of a flim called "clockwork" about a headmaster
who tries and fails to get a headteachers conference to give a speech,.
played by john cleese, comedy. "A Clockwork Orange" is very
different.....
> it's kind of weird, i've watched it at least 4 times, im clueless of
> the plot
right... group of delinquent teenagers get together, they are bored,
disaffected, sexually frustrated and generally quite ****ed up (sorry
if I get the details wrong but it has been a long time since I read the
book or seen the film). they together as a gang and have Alec the most
****ed up as their 'leader', and for some reason they chose as their
uniform to wear on their 'excursions' of robbing, violence and sexual
assaults, bowler hats, white boiler suts and doc marten boots, and
generally carry big stick and truncheon s around to hit people with.
Basically they seem tot get a kick out of violence and violent sex
(certainly alec does).
well during an unsuccessful burglary involving an old lady and an
enormous sculpture of a penis, Alec is caught by the fuzz and taken
away, tried and found guilty of loads of deviant crimes. He goes to
prison where he is selected by some official type person in charge of
prison or something (home office minister? i can't remember correctly)
for some fantastic new treatment of rehabilitation of offenders and
this is wehre it gets interesting (for me anyway). The treatment is
basically conditioning using negative reinforcements; Alec is forced o
watch videos of violent acts and sexual practices whilst being made by
use of drugs to feel nauseous (physically sick). I think he is also
beaten up and possibly given electric shocks when shown these images
too? Basically what they are trying to induce in him is the feelign of
repulsion and nausea whenever he is presented with the kind of things
(violence, sexual assault, generally brutality) that used to 'turn him
on' before, therefore hopefully turning him into a reformed character
and cured of the desire to do bad and nasty things ever again.

ok i may have got some of that wrong but it has been a long time since
i saw the film so correct any of the things I got wrong if you know
better. get it out on dvd or video if you want sheelagh, it can get a
bit psychedelic and weird at times, and it is rather too long for my
attention span, but it is a interesting critique on the violent minds
of the disaffected youth of today and the possibility of rehabilitation
of violent offenders. watch it then tell us what you think of it.
personally I would rather get out 'March of the Penguins', or a video
of nothing but kittens playing together, i don't like to be reminded of
the terrible violence and suffering so common in the world around me. I
can't even watch Watership Down without crying my eyes out even today,
I haven't even attempted to watch Bambi.

bookie

sheelagh
January 7th 07, 01:20 AM
bookie wrote:
> Charlie Wilkes wrote:
> > On 5 Jan 2007 13:30:45 -0800, "sheelagh"
> > > wrote:
> > >
> > >My mother once came out with a statement that I have never forgotten.I
> > >don't think that she realised that she has never made a truer
> > >statement...It was, "well I blame the parents personally"...
> > >It was sooo true!!!?
> > >I would die of shame if my kids were like that.
> > >S.
> >
> > Are you familiar with the poetry of Philip Larkin? He lived in Hull,
> > where he was a librarian with a somewhat lonely and threadbare life.
> > I think you and Bookie would both enjoy his work.
>
> yes i am familiar with his work, he was also a bit of a ladies man too
> as well as writing the now infamous line 'they **** you up your mum and
> dad' (which is what i think you are referring to)
> >
> > Your description of teenagers in the U.K. makes me think of "A
> > Clockwork Orange," a book by Anthony Burgess (I think) that was made
> > into a movie directed by Stanley Kubrick.

You know what, you are a true treasure of useful information,lol)

> yes it was anthony burgess who wrote a clockwork orange, he wrote it
> based on his own experiences when his house was broken into by a gang
> of delinquents, his wife raped and most of his possession stolen in the
> process as he was kicked and beaten by the gang. He kind of
> extrapolated the characters in the book from what he thought the
> individual inthe gang were really like, their lives, histories, what
> made them do it, their motivations. Certainly
> as someone with a background in psychology I find the treatment of Alec
> is very interesting although not sure that simliar conditioning would
> be effective in all cases.

You have just saved me a week's worth of evening reading in this
instance.
It has saved me going to the library to order a film & or book, that no
doubt not be there, then, also every spare moment in between time
trying to read it then understand it's hidden innuedoe's to understand
it's inner & obviously hidden meaning..because it wwasn't obvious to
the layman's eye, I assure you!

I found the film rather hard to follow.In fact It was so hard, that I
had to watch it twice,yet still didn't understand what it was trying to
convey.I found it rather distasteful-but then again, so are chav's,so
perhaps the reason was not lost on me...?

> oddly enough i got bored with the film and fell asleep the first time i
> watched it but the book held my interest much more (films and videos
> tend o have a generally soporific effect on me anyway, i just have to
> press 'play' onthe machine and i am asleep already)

Soperific, Is a word that I haven't heard in some time,lol..but very
effective in what you were you were trying to point out.It was rather a
boring film unless you understood it's true meaning.

> unfortunately the portrayal of teenagers and disaffected youth by
> mcdowell etc inthe film is not very far from the way the young of today
> do behave in this country, terrible really, burgess probably did not
> realise his work may actually be prophetic (although I have never been
> hit over the head with a massive sculpture of a penis by one of them,
> not yet anyway)

On this I think we can agree.I think that it is unusually prophetic,or
more specificaly,prophetic about the youth of Britain today.

When I used the word chav, it was because of the connotation of it's
meaning.It was the best way that I could find to describe the thought
pattern of today's youth's & what they aspire to & to give Charlie some
idea of thier mind set..also It's medal of honour, thoughtline when it
comes to Asbo's.

In describing them, I hoped that he would understand why we were
speaking of them in such a negative manner & mindset.
If I can take you to a different film, it would be to *Men In Black*,
where Will Smith came out with the line, "the best of the best,...sir"
..It was delivered in such a derogatory manner , even though it's simple
implication was that of sarcasm....

This takes me back to your original statement, where I think that
Charlie thought you were being overly, genuinely cynical when
describing some of your more *challenging* students...
I would have to say, that possibly, If he could equate some of them to
Usa's gang culture, that he might understand how truely obnoxious some
of your students can be?!!
Also, being a bank teacher, doesn't help matters- simply because It
didn't really give you the time to set boundry's with some of the trash
that you are presented with, & by law, given no chioce other than to
try & teach them the national curiculum.No easy task...
And, frankly, I personaly, would prefer the thought of teaching
criminals in the penal system to teaching some of the morons presented
by todays parents.

This, was where I attributed it as the parent's fault, because surely
if you cared one whit for your child, you would do anything that you
could to ensure that your child didn't turn out like that-I am aware
that some children are soooo willful that nothing works.However, these
are few & far between, where as in the case of the convict, I believe
that most of them are there in the learning process because they choose
to be there;the child isn't and will do anything that they can to
provoke a reaction..thaat is in fact exactly what they want, so that
they can use that instance against you as Bookie was tring to tell you.

With 5kids of my own, I come into contact with a variety of these kids
& can assure you that it must indeed be a very challenging career.
I could suggest sticking to infant and junior school... but I am sorry
to say that they can be just as bad there too.
(elementary & junior high)

On the whole, given the fact's, I think I would go for accountancy
too,lol
Ps:I hear that B.Telecom pay extreemly well, or even consider
[email protected] least you get the fringe benefit;s that go with it...

> bookie
> > Charlie
Sheela :o)
..

Cat Psychologist
January 7th 07, 02:23 AM
sheelagh wrote:
> Cat Psychologist wrote:
> > sheelagh wrote:
> > >* have bigger fish to fry...

> > > S.
> > > It's not her fault, It is my fault, either way.
> >
> > dear God!
>
> An extreem case of the pot calling the kettle black here;(
> S.

it is rather extreme
so you just throw yourself on the mercy of the group? no blameing or
pointing the finger?
hmmm, you're a bigger man than I am...

sheelagh
January 7th 07, 04:45 AM
> > > >* have bigger fish to fry...
>
> > > > S.
> > > > It's not her fault, It is my fault, either way.
> > >
> > > dear God!
> >
> > An extreem case of the pot calling the kettle black here;(
> > S.
>
> it is rather extreme
> so you just throw yourself on the mercy of the group? no blameing or
> pointing the finger?
> hmmm, you're a bigger man than I am...

Who....Me??????

I don't think I have much choice really, do I:(
Poore li'l old Belle,
I feel awful about it, & yes I do feel a few fingers headed my
way....But then you wouldn't dream of it, would you ROFLOL????
I put a photo of her in blind cat,Bookie's bit that Mary started up.
You will see her in there with tazy, & a few other kitty's she has had
in prior litters.
She is off to the vet as soon as she has had them(IF she is up the
duff)..
<on my knee's right now begging,cant you see me?>

S;o)

Charlie Wilkes
January 7th 07, 09:41 AM
On 6 Jan 2007 14:36:48 -0800, "bookie" >
wrote:

>
>Charlie Wilkes wrote:
>> On 5 Jan 2007 13:30:45 -0800, "sheelagh"
>> > wrote:
>> >
>> >My mother once came out with a statement that I have never forgotten.I
>> >don't think that she realised that she has never made a truer
>> >statement...It was, "well I blame the parents personally"...
>> >It was sooo true!!!?
>> >I would die of shame if my kids were like that.
>> >S.
>>
>> Are you familiar with the poetry of Philip Larkin? He lived in Hull,
>> where he was a librarian with a somewhat lonely and threadbare life.
>> I think you and Bookie would both enjoy his work.
>
>yes i am familiar with his work, he was also a bit of a ladies man too

??? Larkin? No. He was too introspective. He had a huge
pornography collection, however.

Larkin was in charge of the library at the University of Hull. Here
is a riff he composed about his job:

"Day by day your estimation clocks up
who deserves a smile and who a frown
And girls you have to tell to pull their socks up
are the ones whose pants you'd most like to pull down"

He was a lecher, a racist, and something of a misogynist. But he
wrote good poetry.

>as well as writing the now infamous line 'they **** you up your mum and
>dad' (which is what i think you are referring to)

Yeah. But Larkin's correspondence has been published, and his view of
the world bears some similarity to what I see in the back-and-forth
between you and Sheelagh. So I think you would enjoy the complete
range of his work, which has all been collected into one volume.

>>
>> Your description of teenagers in the U.K. makes me think of "A
>> Clockwork Orange," a book by Anthony Burgess (I think) that was made
>> into a movie directed by Stanley Kubrick.
>>
>yes it was anthony burgess who wrote a clockwork orange, he wrote it
>based on his own experiences when his house was broken into by a gang
>of delinquents, his wife raped and most of his possession stolen in the
>process as he was kicked and beaten by the gang. He kind of
>extrapolated the characters in the book from what he thought the
>individual inthe gang were really like, their lives, histories, what
>made them do it, their motivations. Certainly
>as someone with a background in psychology I find the treatment of Alec
>is very interesting although not sure that simliar conditioning would
>be effective in all cases.
>
>oddly enough i got bored with the film and fell asleep the first time i
>watched it but the book held my interest much more (films and videos
>tend o have a generally soporific effect on me anyway, i just have to
>press 'play' onthe machine and i am asleep already)
>
>unfortunately the portrayal of teenagers and disaffected youth by
>mcdowell etc inthe film is not very far from the way the young of today
>do behave in this country, terrible really, burgess probably did not
>realise his work may actually be prophetic (although I have never been
>hit over the head with a massive sculpture of a penis by one of them,
>not yet anyway)

They have nothing great to look forward to, and nothing terrible to
struggle against. Meanwhile they see the lives they'd like to have
being acted out by celebrities, and it just makes their own lives seem
that much more barren and frustrating. I understand. I was a punk in
my time. But I wasn't overtly violent.

Charlie

Cat Psychologist
January 7th 07, 11:13 AM
sheelagh wrote:

> I put a photo of her in blind cat,Bookie's bit that Mary started up.
> You will see her in there with tazy, & a few other kitty's she has had
> in prior litters.

I'm not sure where you put the photo. who is Mary? where is Bookies bit
that Mary started up, you must mean MaryL

> She is off to the vet as soon as she has had them(IF she is up the
> duff)..
> <on my knee's right now begging,cant you see me?>
>
> S;o)

a wittle wouder pwease?

sheelagh
January 7th 07, 02:13 PM
Cat Psychologist wrote:
> sheelagh wrote:
>
> > I put a photo of her in blind cat,Bookie's bit that Mary started up.
> > You will see her in there with tazy, & a few other kitty's she has had
> > in prior litters.
>
> I'm not sure where you put the photo. who is Mary? where is Bookies bit
> that Mary started up, you must mean MaryL
>
> > She is off to the vet as soon as she has had them(IF she is up the
> > duff)..
> > <on my knee's right now begging,cant you see me?>
> >
> > S;o)
>
> a wittle wouder pwease?

It's posted under, Bookie:any new on the blind cat.
Yes, It is Mary L by the way.

"MY CAT IS PREGNANT, I AM A FOOL"!
You mean like that?

She is, I'm 95% certain of it....
That makes her ready to drop around last week in last week of January
or the 1st week in February, going by my calendar...
<Sheelagh is most definaley on he hands and knee's, begging right now>

I am very much hoping that it is going to be a small litter;less than
3kittens with any luck at all- mind you, It isn't very often that I
have good luck when I Want it to be good luck!!

Howz dem kitty's den?

They should be waddeling about by now & getting mega cute too.
I have also decided to keep Lucy(fur!)..By popular demand~It has been
decided that I now own her because she loe's Tilly, my 10yr old!She is
absolutetly deighted about it all., buf I am starting to feel like a
cattery would, I think lol!!!!

I am starting to feel a like a care home for the catz;it is already
called Catz~Cask
Never mind,It is all good fun!
S;o)

Cat Psychologist
January 7th 07, 02:55 PM
sheelagh wrote:

> I am starting to feel a like a care home for the catz;it is already
> called Catz~Cask
> Never mind,It is all good fun!
> S;o)

well, im not one to wring the nose

it's been beautiful here, day and night
the kittens are kicking and Im loving it

bookie
January 7th 07, 04:07 PM
..
> I have also decided to keep Lucy(fur!)..By popular demand~It has been
> decided that I now own her because she loe's Tilly, my 10yr old!She is
> absolutetly deighted about it all., buf I am starting to feel like a
> cattery would, I think lol!!!!

thank god for that! I wondered when you would see sense, it would be
just too heartbreaking for little Lucy to be wrenched away from a home
and friend she loves and where she feels safe finally. She has
definitely got her paws under the table then? do we get any photos of
her?

bookie

bookie
January 7th 07, 04:11 PM
>
> They have nothing great to look forward to, and nothing terrible to
> struggle against. Meanwhile they see the lives they'd like to have
> being acted out by celebrities, and it just makes their own lives seem
> that much more barren and frustrating. I understand. I was a punk in
> my time. But I wasn't overtly violent.
>
I don't give a **** if they don't have anything concrete to struggle
against now, they will have when they leave school and have no
qualifications and are trying to get a job and buy all the things that
they take for granted and were given as kids. Does not give them they
right to treat me like dirt and be nasty and abusive to anyone and
everyone who tries to help them.

**** them all, bring back corporal punishment, it would do most of them
the world of good

can we talk about furry kittens now?

sheelagh
January 7th 07, 10:27 PM
Cat Psychologist wrote:
> sheelagh wrote:
>
> > I am starting to feel a like a care home for the catz;it is already
> > called Catz~Cask
> > Never mind,It is all good fun!
> > S;o)
>
> well, im not one to wring the nose
>
> it's been beautiful here, day and night
> the kittens are kicking and Im loving it
Lucky old you:o)

It will be my turn too in a few weeks time..I can't wait.
For the 1st 3weeks, they look like little white blind mice, then within
a week they suddenly morph into little fat pom poms ropming all over
the place;in fact they take over the house & we all work around them!

All too soon I find myself sorting through sheet and hours of
applicants wanting one of them to love for the next 16ish years.The
trick is read between the lines and find the genuine one's that really
do want to love one for ever, and ever, rather than the ones that want
an "expensive looking" kitty that matches their interior decore.

There are some really genuine ones out there that love kitty, for
kitty alone.
It* is hard* finding the apropriate homes.By appropriate, I don't mean
the ones that have the money to throw around, I mean the one's that
will love them for who they are, rather than what they are, If that
makes any sense to you?

Many times, I have ended up almost giving them away to a families who
have children & lots of action in the home, rather than the one's with
2.5 kids, a square huge mortgage,the most fasionable car ...& no time
to spare just giving kitty cuddles for the sake of it?!
I advertise as soon as I know they are on the way, so that it gives me
the time to get to know them & meet them well before I consider them
for one of them.By the time they are ready to go home, I "need" to be
assured that I am doing the right thing, & I have some really good
hurdles to put them over too~ If they get through them, then I consider
them.
It's a bit like giving the family heirloom's away..I need to know that
I have done the right thing, well before I do it.....

I have one in mind already.She is a lady that lost her beloved tabby
cat, & called me thinking I was advertising a tabby, when what I
actually meant was a tabby point.
She had, had her tabby for 15 years & felt guilty for looking foir
another companion because she was so [email protected], I consider her well
young enough to be around for kitty's natural life & is at home all day
to cuddle her too...I told her to stop feeling guilty & to carry on
living.Having met her, I think she is just the sort of mummy I am
looking for!
S:o)

sheelagh
January 7th 07, 10:35 PM
bookie wrote:
> .
> > I have also decided to keep Lucy(fur!)..By popular demand~It has been
> > decided that I now own her because she loe's Tilly, my 10yr old!She is
> > absolutetly deighted about it all., buf I am starting to feel like a
> > cattery would, I think lol!!!!
>
> thank god for that! I wondered when you would see sense, it would be
> just too heartbreaking for little Lucy to be wrenched away from a home
> and friend she loves and where she feels safe finally. She has
> definitely got her paws under the table then? do we get any photos of
> her?
>
> bookie
This is very true,lol!I was just a bit worride about what my neighbors
think, & that is the wrong apprach to life.

It's my damned house & as long as they are no nuisance to any one, then
I so no reason to worry.
Lucy has most definately got her claws into the rug & under the tabe
too,tee hee>"o"<
I will get the camera out tomorrow morning and get a few decent ones of
her to share with you all.She is a really silken sox & cuddlesome cat
now that Tilly has given her a loada love and time too.I don't think
Tilly would have forgiven me If I had either(homed her I mean)..
Kids have homework to do for an hour or 2, then be back on line to tell
you more about her in today's acheivements ...
S:o)

Charlie Wilkes
January 8th 07, 12:26 AM
On 7 Jan 2007 07:11:56 -0800, "bookie" >
wrote:

>
>>
>> They have nothing great to look forward to, and nothing terrible to
>> struggle against. Meanwhile they see the lives they'd like to have
>> being acted out by celebrities, and it just makes their own lives seem
>> that much more barren and frustrating. I understand. I was a punk in
>> my time. But I wasn't overtly violent.
>>
>I don't give a **** if they don't have anything concrete to struggle
>against now, they will have when they leave school and have no
>qualifications and are trying to get a job and buy all the things that
>they take for granted and were given as kids. Does not give them they
>right to treat me like dirt and be nasty and abusive to anyone and
>everyone who tries to help them.
>
>**** them all, bring back corporal punishment, it would do most of them
>the world of good
>
>can we talk about furry kittens now?

Sure. My furry cat is named Tweaker. I acquired him one night when I
was driving along and he loomed up in my headlights, sprawled across
the road, bleeding from his eyeballs. I took him home and he
recovered. He was a barn cat, had never been neutered, and was full
of parasites (fleas and ear mites).

Now he is a pampered housecat, and he is the friendliest cat I've ever
had.

Charlie

cybercat
January 8th 07, 02:10 AM
"Charlie Wilkes" > wrote in message
...
> On 7 Jan 2007 07:11:56 -0800, "bookie" >
> wrote:

>
> Sure. My furry cat is named Tweaker. I acquired him one night when I
> was driving along and he loomed up in my headlights, sprawled across
> the road, bleeding from his eyeballs. I took him home and he
> recovered. He was a barn cat, had never been neutered, and was full
> of parasites (fleas and ear mites).
>
> Now he is a pampered housecat, and he is the friendliest cat I've ever
> had.
>
Sigh. I love that story. Give him a face rub for me.

bookie
January 8th 07, 03:27 AM
Charlie Wilkes wrote:
> On 7 Jan 2007 07:11:56 -0800, "bookie" >
> wrote:
>
> >
> >>
> >> They have nothing great to look forward to, and nothing terrible to
> >> struggle against. Meanwhile they see the lives they'd like to have
> >> being acted out by celebrities, and it just makes their own lives seem
> >> that much more barren and frustrating. I understand. I was a punk in
> >> my time. But I wasn't overtly violent.
> >>
> >I don't give a **** if they don't have anything concrete to struggle
> >against now, they will have when they leave school and have no
> >qualifications and are trying to get a job and buy all the things that
> >they take for granted and were given as kids. Does not give them they
> >right to treat me like dirt and be nasty and abusive to anyone and
> >everyone who tries to help them.
> >
> >**** them all, bring back corporal punishment, it would do most of them
> >the world of good
> >
> >can we talk about furry kittens now?
>
> Sure. My furry cat is named Tweaker. I acquired him one night when I
> was driving along and he loomed up in my headlights, sprawled across
> the road, bleeding from his eyeballs. I took him home and he
> recovered. He was a barn cat, had never been neutered, and was full
> of parasites (fleas and ear mites).
>
> Now he is a pampered housecat, and he is the friendliest cat I've ever
> had.
>
bless, all cats were really born to be pampered, whenever anyone comes
out with "you spoil that cat!" i always reply "yes?! and?!!!!" i don't
see what their problem is, unless of course they think i do not spoil
my cat enough, but I hope not.

had he been hit by a car then? internal bleeding after head trauma can
cause that kind of bleeding from eyeballs and into the eyes, awful to
see, is he fully recovered? do you have any photos to show? does he
have any kitty friends?
poor sausage, nice to know he found someone to love and worship him in
the way he should be, as all cats should be.

btw I am not keen on larkin, I prefer john betjeman and his poetic
portraits of a forgotten england, the england of the pre and post war
years, of the home counties, of cricket matches on village greens
somewhere in surrey or berkshire, of romances and courtships conducted
in the correct manner, etc etc. I think my favourite of his 'The
Subaltern's Love Song' and the images it conjures up of wholesome
innocence as a young man courts his sporting young lady in the proper
manner (' we stayed in the car park until a quarter past one, and now
I'm engaged to Miss J. Hunter-Dunn!) and how he adores all the small
aspects about her. I wish chaps were like that these days; patient,
courteous, gentlemanly instead of being selfish ****s who only want to
get a quick shag out of you.

oh well, nevermind, Bookie

Charlie Wilkes
January 8th 07, 06:01 AM
On Sun, 7 Jan 2007 20:10:17 -0500, "cybercat" >
wrote:

>
>"Charlie Wilkes" > wrote in message
...
>> On 7 Jan 2007 07:11:56 -0800, "bookie" >
>> wrote:
>
>>
>> Sure. My furry cat is named Tweaker. I acquired him one night when I
>> was driving along and he loomed up in my headlights, sprawled across
>> the road, bleeding from his eyeballs. I took him home and he
>> recovered. He was a barn cat, had never been neutered, and was full
>> of parasites (fleas and ear mites).
>>
>> Now he is a pampered housecat, and he is the friendliest cat I've ever
>> had.
>>
>Sigh. I love that story. Give him a face rub for me.

He is sitting in my lap at this moment, purring and burrowing his head
into my armpit while I type this.

Charlie
>

Charlie Wilkes
January 8th 07, 07:03 AM
On 7 Jan 2007 18:27:52 -0800, "bookie" >
wrote:

>
>Charlie Wilkes wrote:
>> On 7 Jan 2007 07:11:56 -0800, "bookie" >
>> wrote:
>>
>> >
>> >>
>> >> They have nothing great to look forward to, and nothing terrible to
>> >> struggle against. Meanwhile they see the lives they'd like to have
>> >> being acted out by celebrities, and it just makes their own lives seem
>> >> that much more barren and frustrating. I understand. I was a punk in
>> >> my time. But I wasn't overtly violent.
>> >>
>> >I don't give a **** if they don't have anything concrete to struggle
>> >against now, they will have when they leave school and have no
>> >qualifications and are trying to get a job and buy all the things that
>> >they take for granted and were given as kids. Does not give them they
>> >right to treat me like dirt and be nasty and abusive to anyone and
>> >everyone who tries to help them.
>> >
>> >**** them all, bring back corporal punishment, it would do most of them
>> >the world of good
>> >
>> >can we talk about furry kittens now?
>>
>> Sure. My furry cat is named Tweaker. I acquired him one night when I
>> was driving along and he loomed up in my headlights, sprawled across
>> the road, bleeding from his eyeballs. I took him home and he
>> recovered. He was a barn cat, had never been neutered, and was full
>> of parasites (fleas and ear mites).
>>
>> Now he is a pampered housecat, and he is the friendliest cat I've ever
>> had.
>>
>bless, all cats were really born to be pampered, whenever anyone comes
>out with "you spoil that cat!" i always reply "yes?! and?!!!!" i don't
>see what their problem is, unless of course they think i do not spoil
>my cat enough, but I hope not.
>
>had he been hit by a car then?

Yes.

>internal bleeding after head trauma can
>cause that kind of bleeding from eyeballs and into the eyes, awful to
>see, is he fully recovered? do you have any photos to show? does he
>have any kitty friends?

He has canine friends. I am more or less permanently taking care of
someone else's dog, and my tenants have a pit bull named Joey.
Tweaker is friends with both of them.

>poor sausage, nice to know he found someone to love and worship him in
>the way he should be, as all cats should be.
>
>btw I am not keen on larkin, I prefer john betjeman and his poetic
>portraits of a forgotten england, the england of the pre and post war
>years, of the home counties, of cricket matches on village greens
>somewhere in surrey or berkshire, of romances and courtships conducted
>in the correct manner, etc etc. I think my favourite of his 'The
>Subaltern's Love Song' and the images it conjures up of wholesome
>innocence as a young man courts his sporting young lady in the proper
>manner (' we stayed in the car park until a quarter past one, and now
>I'm engaged to Miss J. Hunter-Dunn!) and how he adores all the small

Right... "Miss J. Hunter Dunn, furnish'd and burnish'd by Aldershot
sun..."

I think of Betjeman as a satirist who made fun of provincial
mannerisms. Maybe I sell him short. To be honest, I haven't read
much of his poetry.

>aspects about her. I wish chaps were like that these days; patient,
>courteous, gentlemanly instead of being selfish ****s who only want to
>get a quick shag out of you.

Hmmm. You are frustrated with your surroundings, aren't you?

Charlie

>
>oh well, nevermind, Bookie

bookie
January 8th 07, 02:41 PM
>
> Hmmm. You are frustrated with your surroundings, aren't you?
>
more disappointed these days

Cat Psychologist
January 9th 07, 12:40 AM
Charlie Wilkes wrote:

> He is sitting in my lap at this moment, purring and burrowing his head
> into my armpit while I type this.
>
> Charlie
> >

Lucille did that today, I was sitting at the dining table and she had
worked her way into my lap. She kept headbutting my wrist then up my
arm.

Cat Friend
January 9th 07, 03:17 AM
Nooo. I' don't love that. I hate that story.


--
Cat Friend - Unregistered User
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sheelagh
January 9th 07, 05:50 AM
Cat Psychologist wrote:
> Charlie Wilkes wrote:
>
> > He is sitting in my lap at this moment, purring and burrowing his head
> > into my armpit while I type this.
> >
> > Charlie
> > >
>
> Lucille did that today, I was sitting at the dining table and she had
> worked her way into my lap. She kept headbutting my wrist then up my
> arm
Have any of your cats gone the whole hog, & knocked the whole plate
down whilst your mind was elsewhere so far?
Ringo did it to me on sunday, just for the chicken on the plate!

Yet another bad habit to break...speaking of which, this is day two
since I gave up smoking.
I am gagging for a fag, but refuse go give in:(
I know I will appreciate it later, but right now I really could almost
give anything for one!

sheelagh
January 9th 07, 10:42 AM
bookie wrote:
> >
> > Hmmm. You are frustrated with your surroundings, aren't you?
> >
> more disappointed these days
Bookie,

I would be most interested to know whether you see your screen like
this link when you post?
I noticed it this morning:
when I had a quick peep at the final posting
re:Quote:Nooo,I don't love that.I hate that story...

written by someone called cat friend?

http://pets-99.com/groups/newreply.php?do=newreply&noquote=1&p=56763

I have never viewed my screen like this and wondered whether it is just
me, or whether this is a different way of posting?
It offer's a lot more ways of posting to more groups than I have ever
noticed before.

I can't shake the feeling it could be someone we already know?

A very odd feeling about this because it is an unregisterd poster.I
thought you had to be registered to post?
S.