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January 8th 07, 08:05 PM
A month ago, my 3 year old cat Omar suddenly opened his mouth and
seemed to gasp for air. He's a big cat (20 lbs and looks like a Maine
Coon mix) so he often seemed a bit winded when he exerted himself. This
time his tongue was blue so my mother rushed him to the emergency vet.
There he was on oxygen for 13 hours before he could breathe on his own.
X-rays showed his lungs were full of fluid and one was partially
collapsed. The vets mentioned a number of tests that could be done, but
seemed to think it was asthma and/or pneumonia. For the next 2 weeks
Omar was on antibiotics, steroids, and an Albuterol inhaler. His
breathing remained labored. He's hard to pill, so I took him back in
for a long-lasting steroid shot. I noticed he seemed to go downhill
after this.

I then took him to my regular vet and she recommended an echocardiogram
at a veterinary specialist clinic. I took him in that day and they put
him on oxygen for 5 hours in addition to running the echo.

The results of the echo were devastating. The doctor says his left
ventricle is enlarged, and he had dilated cardiomyopathy. He warned us
that Omar could suddenly die at any time, but he also seemed kind of
baffled. My regular vet too says she hasn't seen a case of feline
dilated cardio in years due to the addition of adequate amounts of
taurine in commercial cat food. Omar was a stray for the first 7
months of his life, but ever since then he's been on a diet of Iams
and Purina One dry food with a little bit of Fancy Feast canned food
every morning.

When given pills, he starts breathing real hard and acts panicky, so I
asked the vet at the emergency clinic for alternatives (since he will
not eat his food with any medicine in it). They don't like giving out
needles to people, but I begged successfully for some injectable Salix
(diuretic). They also got my local compound pharmacy to make a
transdermal ointment of Enalapril (rubbed in the ear daily). I also had
taurine compounded in a tuna solution (no prescription needed for this
one) which isn't too hard to get down his throat. The veterinary
specilaist said a taurine deficiency is unlikely (as this is probably
genetic), but I should add 500 mgs a day anyway.

I know there are other helpful cardiac supplements (Hawthorn Berry,
CoEnzyme Q10) but I can't get any pills in him, and it's just too
expensive to have everything compounded into a liquid.

I feel like I'm on a deathwatch with this dear, sweet cat. He's so
gentle that all the other cats adore him. Now he seems lethargic and
eats only a little. My incessant crying isn't helping I know. Does
anyone have any ideas. Is there any hope??

Thanks,

Sheri

Lynne
January 8th 07, 08:57 PM
on Mon, 08 Jan 2007 19:05:02 GMT, wrote:

> Does
> anyone have any ideas. Is there any hope??

Oh, I am so sorry to hear this...

Were there any arrhythmias noted? If not, and if your cat does well over
the next couple of weeks, he might be okay. His prognosis really depends
on the specifics of his other symptoms.

I would run any supplements by the vet specialist before giving them to
your cat. They may be natural, but they are also often "drugs" too and
can have nasty side effects or interactions with the other drugs your cat
is taking. Keeping your cat's stress levels to a minimum is very
important, so pilling him is really not a good idea if you can avoid it.
If he likes his canned food better than kibbles, give him more canned
food.

It would be a good idea to weigh him every day, or even twice a day. The
best way to do this is to hold him and get on the scale. Then put him
down and weigh yourself. Subtract your weight from the first reading and
you will have his weight. A digital scale will make this easier. If you
notice any weight gain, get him to the vet specialist right away as it's
likely due to congestive heart failure. CHF causes fluid retention and
therefore weight gain. If this happens, they can put him on IV diuretics
and give him palliative care (which may include medicine for pain).

I'm sure he's picking up on your stress, so make a point of enjoying
every moment you have left with him. I hope he recovers and lives a
long, healthy life.

--
Lynne

bluemaxx
January 8th 07, 09:36 PM
{{{{Sheri}}}}... my heart truly goes out to you. Your post brings back so
many memories. I lost my beloved 12 year old Siamese cat 2.5 years ago to
the same disease and still miss Maxx every day. His cardiologist had said
it was genetic and that Maxx could go anytime within 3-6 months. Maxx had
also been fed quality foods throughout his life, so I know his diet didn't
have a taurine deficiency.

I only had 4 extra months with him after his diagnosis. Over the years with
him, Maxx would also seem winded after playful exertion, but I wrote it off
to the virus he had caught as a kitten that would show up once or twice a
year as eye leakage and nasal congestion.

I found this blurb at http://www.homevet.com/petcare/felcardi.html#prognosis

"Many cats will live up to three years if properly medicated. If clinical
heart disease is already present when cardiomyopathy is detected the
survival rate averages three months to three years. If the disease is
detected in its asymptomatic state however, your cat may live a long life
with close monitoring of the condition by your veterinarian or a veterinary
cardiologist. The survival rate averages about 6 months. The exception is
when CM is caused by hyperthyroidism. If hyperthyroidism is successfully
treated, the heart function will generally return to normal and the cat will
no longer require treatment."

On an off chance, you might want to have Omar tested for hyperthyroidism,
unless your vets have already done that. The very best luck to you and
Omar... I hope you can beat this.
hugs,
Linda
Tucker-cat photos: http://www.picturetrail.com/bluemaxx
Cat Surgery Fund eBay auctions: http://search.ebay.com/_W0QQsassZtwolegs

> wrote in message
oups.com...
:A month ago, my 3 year old cat Omar suddenly opened his mouth and
: seemed to gasp for air. He's a big cat (20 lbs and looks like a Maine
: Coon mix) so he often seemed a bit winded when he exerted himself. This
: time his tongue was blue so my mother rushed him to the emergency vet.
: There he was on oxygen for 13 hours before he could breathe on his own.
: X-rays showed his lungs were full of fluid and one was partially
: collapsed. The vets mentioned a number of tests that could be done, but
: seemed to think it was asthma and/or pneumonia. For the next 2 weeks
: Omar was on antibiotics, steroids, and an Albuterol inhaler. His
: breathing remained labored. He's hard to pill, so I took him back in
: for a long-lasting steroid shot. I noticed he seemed to go downhill
: after this.
:
: I then took him to my regular vet and she recommended an echocardiogram
: at a veterinary specialist clinic. I took him in that day and they put
: him on oxygen for 5 hours in addition to running the echo.
:
: The results of the echo were devastating. The doctor says his left
: ventricle is enlarged, and he had dilated cardiomyopathy. He warned us
: that Omar could suddenly die at any time, but he also seemed kind of
: baffled. My regular vet too says she hasn't seen a case of feline
: dilated cardio in years due to the addition of adequate amounts of
: taurine in commercial cat food. Omar was a stray for the first 7
: months of his life, but ever since then he's been on a diet of Iams
: and Purina One dry food with a little bit of Fancy Feast canned food
: every morning.
:
: When given pills, he starts breathing real hard and acts panicky, so I
: asked the vet at the emergency clinic for alternatives (since he will
: not eat his food with any medicine in it). They don't like giving out
: needles to people, but I begged successfully for some injectable Salix
: (diuretic). They also got my local compound pharmacy to make a
: transdermal ointment of Enalapril (rubbed in the ear daily). I also had
: taurine compounded in a tuna solution (no prescription needed for this
: one) which isn't too hard to get down his throat. The veterinary
: specilaist said a taurine deficiency is unlikely (as this is probably
: genetic), but I should add 500 mgs a day anyway.
:
: I know there are other helpful cardiac supplements (Hawthorn Berry,
: CoEnzyme Q10) but I can't get any pills in him, and it's just too
: expensive to have everything compounded into a liquid.
:
: I feel like I'm on a deathwatch with this dear, sweet cat. He's so
: gentle that all the other cats adore him. Now he seems lethargic and
: eats only a little. My incessant crying isn't helping I know. Does
: anyone have any ideas. Is there any hope??
:
: Thanks,
:
: Sheri

Rene S.
January 8th 07, 10:42 PM
wrote:
> A month ago, my 3 year old cat Omar suddenly opened his mouth and
> seemed to gasp for air. He's a big cat (20 lbs and looks like a Maine
> Coon mix) so he often seemed a bit winded when he exerted himself. This
> time his tongue was blue so my mother rushed him to the emergency vet.
> There he was on oxygen for 13 hours before he could breathe on his own.
> X-rays showed his lungs were full of fluid and one was partially
> collapsed. The vets mentioned a number of tests that could be done, but
> seemed to think it was asthma and/or pneumonia. For the next 2 weeks
> Omar was on antibiotics, steroids, and an Albuterol inhaler. His
> breathing remained labored. He's hard to pill, so I took him back in
> for a long-lasting steroid shot. I noticed he seemed to go downhill
> after this.
>
> I then took him to my regular vet and she recommended an echocardiogram
> at a veterinary specialist clinic. I took him in that day and they put
> him on oxygen for 5 hours in addition to running the echo.
>
> The results of the echo were devastating. The doctor says his left
> ventricle is enlarged, and he had dilated cardiomyopathy. He warned us
> that Omar could suddenly die at any time, but he also seemed kind of
> baffled. My regular vet too says she hasn't seen a case of feline
> dilated cardio in years due to the addition of adequate amounts of
> taurine in commercial cat food. Omar was a stray for the first 7
> months of his life, but ever since then he's been on a diet of Iams
> and Purina One dry food with a little bit of Fancy Feast canned food
> every morning.
>
> When given pills, he starts breathing real hard and acts panicky, so I
> asked the vet at the emergency clinic for alternatives (since he will
> not eat his food with any medicine in it). They don't like giving out
> needles to people, but I begged successfully for some injectable Salix
> (diuretic). They also got my local compound pharmacy to make a
> transdermal ointment of Enalapril (rubbed in the ear daily). I also had
> taurine compounded in a tuna solution (no prescription needed for this
> one) which isn't too hard to get down his throat. The veterinary
> specilaist said a taurine deficiency is unlikely (as this is probably
> genetic), but I should add 500 mgs a day anyway.
>
> I know there are other helpful cardiac supplements (Hawthorn Berry,
> CoEnzyme Q10) but I can't get any pills in him, and it's just too
> expensive to have everything compounded into a liquid.
>
> I feel like I'm on a deathwatch with this dear, sweet cat. He's so
> gentle that all the other cats adore him. Now he seems lethargic and
> eats only a little. My incessant crying isn't helping I know. Does
> anyone have any ideas. Is there any hope??
>

This is NOT a deathwatch for your cat. I have a co-worker who went
through this exact same thing, and though it has taken dozens of trips
to the vet (for xrays and removal of fluid), her kitty has pulled
through and is doing fine, almost a year later. Have you asked your vet
about Rutin (sp)? This is an herb that you can get at GNC and isn't
that expensive. I know you're having troubles pilling him, but you can
put grind it and put it in food.

Another important factor is his diet. Have you considered upgrading to
a high-quality diet, such as Innova, Wellness, or Nature's Variety?

Rene

bookie
January 8th 07, 11:41 PM
wrote:
> A month ago, my 3 year old cat Omar suddenly opened his mouth and
> seemed to gasp for air. He's a big cat (20 lbs and looks like a Maine
> Coon mix) so he often seemed a bit winded when he exerted himself. This
> time his tongue was blue so my mother rushed him to the emergency vet.
> There he was on oxygen for 13 hours before he could breathe on his own.
> X-rays showed his lungs were full of fluid and one was partially
> collapsed. The vets mentioned a number of tests that could be done, but
> seemed to think it was asthma and/or pneumonia. For the next 2 weeks
> Omar was on antibiotics, steroids, and an Albuterol inhaler. His
> breathing remained labored. He's hard to pill, so I took him back in
> for a long-lasting steroid shot. I noticed he seemed to go downhill
> after this.
>
> I then took him to my regular vet and she recommended an echocardiogram
> at a veterinary specialist clinic. I took him in that day and they put
> him on oxygen for 5 hours in addition to running the echo.
>
> The results of the echo were devastating. The doctor says his left
> ventricle is enlarged, and he had dilated cardiomyopathy. He warned us
> that Omar could suddenly die at any time, but he also seemed kind of
> baffled. My regular vet too says she hasn't seen a case of feline
> dilated cardio in years due to the addition of adequate amounts of
> taurine in commercial cat food. Omar was a stray for the first 7
> months of his life, but ever since then he's been on a diet of Iams
> and Purina One dry food with a little bit of Fancy Feast canned food
> every morning.
>
> When given pills, he starts breathing real hard and acts panicky, so I
> asked the vet at the emergency clinic for alternatives (since he will
> not eat his food with any medicine in it). They don't like giving out
> needles to people, but I begged successfully for some injectable Salix
> (diuretic). They also got my local compound pharmacy to make a
> transdermal ointment of Enalapril (rubbed in the ear daily). I also had
> taurine compounded in a tuna solution (no prescription needed for this
> one) which isn't too hard to get down his throat. The veterinary
> specilaist said a taurine deficiency is unlikely (as this is probably
> genetic), but I should add 500 mgs a day anyway.
>
> I know there are other helpful cardiac supplements (Hawthorn Berry,
> CoEnzyme Q10) but I can't get any pills in him, and it's just too
> expensive to have everything compounded into a liquid.
>
> I feel like I'm on a deathwatch with this dear, sweet cat. He's so
> gentle that all the other cats adore him. Now he seems lethargic and
> eats only a little. My incessant crying isn't helping I know. Does
> anyone have any ideas. Is there any hope??
>
> Thanks,
>
> Sheri

can't say anything about the heart disease thing but I have an idea
about the pill giving issue; I got form my vets a small plastic device
which is supposed to help with administering pills to my cat
(hyperthyroid, pills twice a day, used to be a battle royale but now I
have it down to a fine art), I don't knwo what it's commercial name is
but it is liek a large hyperdermic needle type thing, you put the pill
ni one end hold it just inside the cats mouth, squeeze the other end
and the pill shoudl shoot down kitties throat with little fuss at all.

i say 'should' because jessie was much more freaked out at the sight of
me coming towards her with this enormous great contraption in my hand
than she was by the usual method of giving a pill, so i abandoned it
after a while and just got used to surprising her with a pill when she
had just woken up inthe morning and when she was snoozing inthe
evening. Ask you vet about these devices, pill givers? i dontl know
what they are called, cost me about £2 so hardly goign to break the
bank really.

another thingI found quite useful was to give her (and my other cat
previously who was also hyperthyroid) a treat of something afterwards,
whatever it si they like best, with jasper it was a few prawns, jessie
likes whiskas 'temptations' crunchy treats (whichis odd as she has no
teeth and can't really crunch them but she likes them so much she will
purr when she hears the box being rattled) this kind of 'conditions'
them into learning that after they have had the pill they will always
great a treat but you have to consistent and ALWAYS give a treat
afterwards, not fair and won't work otherwise.

in fact, with jasper i used to push the small pills into the cooked and
peeled prawns and he woudl eat them happily not knowing he had just
been given his medication. buy a few prawns if you cat likes them abnd
try that, cooked and peeled prawns, they are liek little fishy pockets
when the heads are off and you can hide a small pill inside easily. The
strong prawn smell seemed to hide the pill and jasper didn;t suspect a
thing (or else he just thought 'who cares? i am getting prawns for
breakfast again, hoorah!').

I would NOT crush the pills up at any cost, pills are usually made in
such a way that the absorption of the medication and active ingredients
inthe gut is regulated by the pill covering. The fact it is in pill
form helps to slow the absorption down and allow the mediaction to
enter the cat's system in a smooth and controlled manner as opposed to
in one big burst. Many types of piklls will say onthe side inthe
smallprint not to crush them but people rarely take much notice.

there are other things you can get form the vet, 'pill pockets' i think
they arecalled, something edible you can put the pill in and give to
your cat as a treat. I think they work with dogs but not sure if they
work with cats (who are not as stupid as dogs, lets face it) or whether
they even make them for cats. All the ones i have seen have been huge
great lumps which i reckon would choke a cat.

best of luck with it all, it is hard when such a beautiful and innocent
creature is suffering and possibly at deaths doors when there are so
many individuals in the world living who don't deserve it and who
create suffering and pain for others instead of relieving it and
causing no harm to anyone like your puss does. so many things in this
world are not fair.

jessie my calico has just come in to the room and sends your omar all
her purrs and head butts and hopes he gets better soon

love Bookie

bookie
January 8th 07, 11:46 PM
wrote:
> A month ago, my 3 year old cat Omar suddenly opened his mouth and
> seemed to gasp for air. He's a big cat (20 lbs and looks like a Maine
> Coon mix) so he often seemed a bit winded when he exerted himself. This
> time his tongue was blue so my mother rushed him to the emergency vet.
> There he was on oxygen for 13 hours before he could breathe on his own.
> X-rays showed his lungs were full of fluid and one was partially
> collapsed. The vets mentioned a number of tests that could be done, but
> seemed to think it was asthma and/or pneumonia. For the next 2 weeks
> Omar was on antibiotics, steroids, and an Albuterol inhaler. His
> breathing remained labored. He's hard to pill, so I took him back in
> for a long-lasting steroid shot. I noticed he seemed to go downhill
> after this.
>
> I then took him to my regular vet and she recommended an echocardiogram
> at a veterinary specialist clinic. I took him in that day and they put
> him on oxygen for 5 hours in addition to running the echo.
>
> The results of the echo were devastating. The doctor says his left
> ventricle is enlarged, and he had dilated cardiomyopathy. He warned us
> that Omar could suddenly die at any time, but he also seemed kind of
> baffled. My regular vet too says she hasn't seen a case of feline
> dilated cardio in years due to the addition of adequate amounts of
> taurine in commercial cat food. Omar was a stray for the first 7
> months of his life, but ever since then he's been on a diet of Iams
> and Purina One dry food with a little bit of Fancy Feast canned food
> every morning.
>
> When given pills, he starts breathing real hard and acts panicky, so I
> asked the vet at the emergency clinic for alternatives (since he will
> not eat his food with any medicine in it). They don't like giving out
> needles to people, but I begged successfully for some injectable Salix
> (diuretic). They also got my local compound pharmacy to make a
> transdermal ointment of Enalapril (rubbed in the ear daily). I also had
> taurine compounded in a tuna solution (no prescription needed for this
> one) which isn't too hard to get down his throat. The veterinary
> specilaist said a taurine deficiency is unlikely (as this is probably
> genetic), but I should add 500 mgs a day anyway.
>
> I know there are other helpful cardiac supplements (Hawthorn Berry,
> CoEnzyme Q10) but I can't get any pills in him, and it's just too
> expensive to have everything compounded into a liquid.
>
> I feel like I'm on a deathwatch with this dear, sweet cat. He's so
> gentle that all the other cats adore him. Now he seems lethargic and
> eats only a little. My incessant crying isn't helping I know. Does
> anyone have any ideas. Is there any hope??
>
> Thanks,
>
> Sheri

found a company in berkshire who sells it online (but i expect you are
inthe US of A) it is the Catac PIll Giver, costs £3.81, aso dirt
cheap, must be a pet shop or something on your side of the pond who
sells it or try the Catac website, best fo luck finding it, bookie

bookie
January 9th 07, 12:20 AM
wrote:
> A month ago, my 3 year old cat Omar suddenly opened his mouth and
> seemed to gasp for air. He's a big cat (20 lbs and looks like a Maine
> Coon mix) so he often seemed a bit winded when he exerted himself. This
> time his tongue was blue so my mother rushed him to the emergency vet.
> There he was on oxygen for 13 hours before he could breathe on his own.
> X-rays showed his lungs were full of fluid and one was partially
> collapsed. The vets mentioned a number of tests that could be done, but
> seemed to think it was asthma and/or pneumonia. For the next 2 weeks
> Omar was on antibiotics, steroids, and an Albuterol inhaler. His
> breathing remained labored. He's hard to pill, so I took him back in
> for a long-lasting steroid shot. I noticed he seemed to go downhill
> after this.
>
> I then took him to my regular vet and she recommended an echocardiogram
> at a veterinary specialist clinic. I took him in that day and they put
> him on oxygen for 5 hours in addition to running the echo.
>
> The results of the echo were devastating. The doctor says his left
> ventricle is enlarged, and he had dilated cardiomyopathy. He warned us
> that Omar could suddenly die at any time, but he also seemed kind of
> baffled. My regular vet too says she hasn't seen a case of feline
> dilated cardio in years due to the addition of adequate amounts of
> taurine in commercial cat food. Omar was a stray for the first 7
> months of his life, but ever since then he's been on a diet of Iams
> and Purina One dry food with a little bit of Fancy Feast canned food
> every morning.
>
> When given pills, he starts breathing real hard and acts panicky, so I
> asked the vet at the emergency clinic for alternatives (since he will
> not eat his food with any medicine in it). They don't like giving out
> needles to people, but I begged successfully for some injectable Salix
> (diuretic). They also got my local compound pharmacy to make a
> transdermal ointment of Enalapril (rubbed in the ear daily). I also had
> taurine compounded in a tuna solution (no prescription needed for this
> one) which isn't too hard to get down his throat. The veterinary
> specilaist said a taurine deficiency is unlikely (as this is probably
> genetic), but I should add 500 mgs a day anyway.
>
> I know there are other helpful cardiac supplements (Hawthorn Berry,
> CoEnzyme Q10) but I can't get any pills in him, and it's just too
> expensive to have everything compounded into a liquid.
>
> I feel like I'm on a deathwatch with this dear, sweet cat. He's so
> gentle that all the other cats adore him. Now he seems lethargic and
> eats only a little. My incessant crying isn't helping I know. Does
> anyone have any ideas. Is there any hope??
>
> Thanks,
>
> Sheri

finally foudn a link to somewhere which sells the pill giver thing I
was on about, it is a company is sudbury in suffolk but they may ship
it out to you if you ask nicely. I reckon postage will probably cost
more than the thing itself in fact

here is the link
http://www.furrypharm.com/shop/category.asp?catid=121

hopefully that will work.
bookie

cybercat
January 9th 07, 01:44 AM
"Rene S." > wrote>

Have you asked your vet
> about Rutin (sp)? This is an herb that you can get at GNC and isn't
> that expensive. I know you're having troubles pilling him, but you can
> put grind it and put it in food.
>
> Another important factor is his diet. Have you considered upgrading to
> a high-quality diet, such as Innova, Wellness, or Nature's Variety?
>

Rutin is part of the C-complex, a bioflavonoid, if I recall
correctly. It is present in rose hips and the white stuff inside
the peel of an orange. Hesperidin is another part.

January 9th 07, 03:20 AM
Thanks so much for all the info. I actually have a little gadget for
pilling a cat, though it may be different than the one you describe.
The problem is Omar acts like he's swallowed the pill, then I find it
lying on the couch the next day.

I also have two old hyperthyroid cats. My vet gave me methimazole pills
that she's says are okay to crush up (under a glass) and then mix in
wet food. They don't have a hard coating or a warning on the bottle, so
I guess it's safe to administer like this. The nice thing about
hyperthyroid cats is that they'll eat anything that doesn't crawl away.
Other sick cats are just the opposite. At least Omar's expressing a
little interest in food ... I'm praying I don't have to force feed him.

Thanks for all your well wishes.

Sheri

January 9th 07, 03:35 AM
Lynne,

He had been gaining weight over the last few months. Now I wonder if it
was fluid retention. Since all this has happened, he lost several
pounds, but still doesn't look too svelte:-) I'm looking at how he's
breathing as an indicator of how much fluid has accumulated (it looks
close to normal since he's been on Salix). But I'll watch for overall
weight gain too.

I'm not sure about the specifics of his heart condition. The vet
specialist uses many technical terms, and I'm too upset to really
comprehend everything , except when he said "the prognosis is poor."
He's a very smart man, but I hope he's wrong on this one.

I spoke with a homeopathic vet about the supplements. She works with
the emergency and specialist clinics. She recommended L-Carnitine,
Vitamin E, CoQ10, and Hawthorn Berry etc. Now it really doesn't matter,
because I feel the stress of shoving pills down his throat all day is
too harmful. Maybe I'll eventually add CoQ10 to the regimen. Right
now he's so lethargic and seems to want to be left alone most of the
time. My heart is just breaking, but I know I have to be rational about
his treatment and prognosis.

Thanks for the info and encouragement,

Sheri

January 9th 07, 03:45 AM
So sorry to hear about your Maxx. We're never ready to lose them, but
the thing that's killing me is that Omar is so young. I once had a cat
die of kidney failure at age 10. I felt so cheated because the cat I
grew up with lived to be 15. Now I would do anything for Omar to live
to be 10 years old.

As for the hyperthyroidism issue ... I have two cats with this disease.
They're old, but skinny and active (and perpetually hungry even with
the medication). Omar's never been very active. He just likes to lay
around looking gorgeous :-)

Thanks for the info on the website ... I'll check that out,

Sheri

January 9th 07, 03:55 AM
Hi Rene,

I'll ask the homeopathic vet about Rutin, but for now I'm just sticking
with the traditional meds and taurine. Maybe I'll gradually add some
supplements if Omar gets his appetite back.

I would love to feed Omar something like Innova, but I have so many
cats (more than I'll admit ... it's in the double digits) that Iams is
a real splurge. Iams also seems to be a great food. I had one cat throw
up everyday for the first couple years I had him. When I switched to
Iams, this stopped, so I've been happy with it.

I also trap and neuter feral cats, so money is tight. Still I may look
into getting some higher quality food just for Omar (the others will
probably murder me in my sleep, but it's hard not to spoil the one
that's sick.)

Thanks,

Sheri

Lynne
January 9th 07, 04:15 AM
on Mon, 08 Jan 2007 19:05:02 GMT, wrote:

> The veterinary
> specilaist said a taurine deficiency is unlikely (as this is probably
> genetic), but I should add 500 mgs a day anyway.

Sheri,

He may have a genetic inability to properly absorb taurine, so adding the
extra taurine is a very good idea. Can you add it to his canned food
instead of to tuna--would he eat it all? I'm only concerned because, as
you know, the tuna doesn't have any taurine and he could probably use as
much of it as possible. When he recovers (and I sincerely hope he will),
discuss continuing to supplement taurine for his entire life. I forgot
to note that in my earlier post.

With all the tests and medications you have paid for, I'm sure money must
be very tight--especially with all the kitties you care for. Maybe you
can just give him extra servings of Fancy Feast instead of going to
anything more expensive? I'm under the impression it's a good food, and
I'd be concerned about changing his diet. Any changes may risk putting
him off his eating, and he's already not eating enough from the sound of
things.

You're a gem, and my heart really goes out to you and Omar. Please let
us know how he fares.

--
Lynne

Rhonda
January 9th 07, 06:30 PM
Shari,

I have a cat like that -- knows every time there is a pill in food. We
have a horrible time giving him pills, he's a former feral and he panics.

We got a suggestion from the vet that worked last time. He told us to
pour some water from a can of tuna (the kind with water, not oil) and
let the pill dissolve in it.

We'd let the pill soften for an hour or so, stir it up and he would
drink it right down! It worked every time and we had to do it for 2 weeks.

I was so skeptical when the vet suggested it, but he said he has never
had a cat that wouldn't take it. Actually, he said to let the pill
dissolve in a syringe of tuna water and then squirt it in and the cats
don't mind, but we tried it in a bowl and he lapped it up.

Rhonda

wrote:


> When given pills, he starts breathing real hard and acts panicky, so I
> asked the vet at the emergency clinic for alternatives (since he will
> not eat his food with any medicine in it).

Magic Mood Jeepİ
January 9th 07, 08:59 PM
Back in November, one of our cats had an URI so bad, he sounded like Darth
Vader breathing under water, and he had to have stronger antibiotics, which
came in pill form. He was so stuffed up, he couldn't smell anything else
but tuna, so that's all he would eat, poor boy. Was murder trying to get
him to swallow it (seems that, even though everyone says cats can't spit -
ours sure can - pills will end up on the other side of the room!), so we hid
it in a pile of tuna, and he gobbled it up, never noticing the pill! And
did it twice a day for five days in a row.

He's all better now!



In ,
Rhonda purred:
> Shari,
>
> I have a cat like that -- knows every time there is a pill in food. We
> have a horrible time giving him pills, he's a former feral and he
> panics.
> We got a suggestion from the vet that worked last time. He told us to
> pour some water from a can of tuna (the kind with water, not oil) and
> let the pill dissolve in it.
>
> We'd let the pill soften for an hour or so, stir it up and he would
> drink it right down! It worked every time and we had to do it for 2
> weeks.
> I was so skeptical when the vet suggested it, but he said he has never
> had a cat that wouldn't take it. Actually, he said to let the pill
> dissolve in a syringe of tuna water and then squirt it in and the cats
> don't mind, but we tried it in a bowl and he lapped it up.
>
> Rhonda
>
> wrote:
>
>
>> When given pills, he starts breathing real hard and acts panicky, so
>> I asked the vet at the emergency clinic for alternatives (since he
>> will not eat his food with any medicine in it).

January 10th 07, 03:43 AM
HI Lynne,

I'm not actually putting the taurine in canned tuna. My local
compounding pharmacy uses a tuna solution for all the cat meds and
supplements, just so it's more palatable to them. In this case, there
is 250 mg of taurine per ml. I just draw some up into the dropper and
squirt it down his throat. I did try to mix powdered taurine in his
food and he wouldn't touch it. That was right after his emergency. I
may try this again ... it would be much cheaper than having taurine
compounded into that tuna juice.

I'm trying anything and everything to get him to eat. He did like some
Friskies (the cuts of meat in gravy) that I had bought tried before.
He's also still eating a little Fancy Feast, but he now seems a bit
more interested in some of the other brands. I think cats get tired of
the same old smells and flavors. I've noticed that if I've been feeding
them Iams dry food for months, and I put some Purina One or a different
flavor of Iams out, they go nuts.

Thanks for your advice and words of encouragement.

Sheri



Lynne wrote:
> on Mon, 08 Jan 2007 19:05:02 GMT, wrote:
>
> > The veterinary
> > specilaist said a taurine deficiency is unlikely (as this is probably
> > genetic), but I should add 500 mgs a day anyway.
>
> Sheri,
>
> He may have a genetic inability to properly absorb taurine, so adding the
> extra taurine is a very good idea. Can you add it to his canned food
> instead of to tuna--would he eat it all? I'm only concerned because, as
> you know, the tuna doesn't have any taurine and he could probably use as
> much of it as possible. When he recovers (and I sincerely hope he will),
> discuss continuing to supplement taurine for his entire life. I forgot
> to note that in my earlier post.
>
> With all the tests and medications you have paid for, I'm sure money must
> be very tight--especially with all the kitties you care for. Maybe you
> can just give him extra servings of Fancy Feast instead of going to
> anything more expensive? I'm under the impression it's a good food, and
> I'd be concerned about changing his diet. Any changes may risk putting
> him off his eating, and he's already not eating enough from the sound of
> things.
>
> You're a gem, and my heart really goes out to you and Omar. Please let
> us know how he fares.
>
> --
> Lynne

Rhonda
January 10th 07, 06:29 AM
Sheri,

You probably know you have to watch what you do to the food of a cat not
eating well. Cats tend to blame their food for making them sick. We had
a mess with a cat with pancreatitus -- every time he didn't feel well,
he'd stop eating whatever kind of food he was eating but would eat
something else. They are pretty good at food aversions.

I don't think I'd try putting medicine or taurine in his regular food
right now. Did you think about trying the tuna juice idea that I
mentioned in the other post?

Good luck,

Rhonda

wrote:
> HI Lynne,
>
> I'm not actually putting the taurine in canned tuna. My local
> compounding pharmacy uses a tuna solution for all the cat meds and
> supplements, just so it's more palatable to them. In this case, there
> is 250 mg of taurine per ml. I just draw some up into the dropper and
> squirt it down his throat. I did try to mix powdered taurine in his
> food and he wouldn't touch it. That was right after his emergency. I
> may try this again ... it would be much cheaper than having taurine
> compounded into that tuna juice.
>
> I'm trying anything and everything to get him to eat. He did like some
> Friskies (the cuts of meat in gravy) that I had bought tried before.
> He's also still eating a little Fancy Feast, but he now seems a bit
> more interested in some of the other brands. I think cats get tired of
> the same old smells and flavors. I've noticed that if I've been feeding
> them Iams dry food for months, and I put some Purina One or a different
> flavor of Iams out, they go nuts.
>
> Thanks for your advice and words of encouragement.
>
> Sheri
>
>
>
> Lynne wrote:
>
>>on Mon, 08 Jan 2007 19:05:02 GMT, wrote:
>>
>>
>>>The veterinary
>>>specilaist said a taurine deficiency is unlikely (as this is probably
>>>genetic), but I should add 500 mgs a day anyway.
>>
>>Sheri,
>>
>>He may have a genetic inability to properly absorb taurine, so adding the
>>extra taurine is a very good idea. Can you add it to his canned food
>>instead of to tuna--would he eat it all? I'm only concerned because, as
>>you know, the tuna doesn't have any taurine and he could probably use as
>>much of it as possible. When he recovers (and I sincerely hope he will),
>>discuss continuing to supplement taurine for his entire life. I forgot
>>to note that in my earlier post.
>>
>>With all the tests and medications you have paid for, I'm sure money must
>>be very tight--especially with all the kitties you care for. Maybe you
>>can just give him extra servings of Fancy Feast instead of going to
>>anything more expensive? I'm under the impression it's a good food, and
>>I'd be concerned about changing his diet. Any changes may risk putting
>>him off his eating, and he's already not eating enough from the sound of
>>things.
>>
>>You're a gem, and my heart really goes out to you and Omar. Please let
>>us know how he fares.
>>
>>--
>>Lynne
>
>

Rhonda
January 10th 07, 06:30 AM
That's great! I feel like we've discovered a great secret that will make
life so much easier.

Rhonda

Magic Mood Jeepİ wrote:
> so we hid
> it in a pile of tuna, and he gobbled it up, never noticing the pill! And
> did it twice a day for five days in a row.

January 10th 07, 05:50 PM
Rhonda,

I'll try the tuna juice idea. The only thing is that it probably
contains a lot of sodium, which is bad for cats with heart disease.
Still I know it's much worse for him to not eat and not get medication.

Thanks so much,

Sheri

bluemaxx
January 11th 07, 03:01 AM
Sheri, you could try feeding Omar baby food with his meds mixed in - I think
turkey flavored is the best, nutrition wise. Most cats love it, thank God.
I read that you said money was tight, but baby food is relatively
inexpensive and it's a great alternative. Whenever Maxx wouldn't eat, I
would force fed him baby food in a syringe to get him eating again. I would
also hide all of his water pills and heart medications & assorted sundry
other meds in the baby food syringe. Luckily, he was used to getting a lot
of liquid antibiotics over his lifetime, so he tolerated the force feeding,
barely. You can buy larger syrings in the baby food aisle at the grocery
store, so you can measure his caloric intake. And don't worry if you don't
get a lot into him at one sitting. You can always try giving him more in
another hour or 2. Just make sure you find out exactly how much food Omar
needs from your veterinarian so you make sure he's getting enough.

I'm not sure if you posted this or not, but you are going to a cardiologist,
right? As far as cost goes, I found that their charges were almost the
same as my regular vets prices and Omar really needs a specialist. When you
go to his appointments, take a notebook and write down the things the
specialist says. I know we try to maintain eye contact when people speak to
us, but when I do that, it goes in one ear and out the other. Just write
down what he says, as he says it and it'll help you understand and remember
things better.

One thing that my regular vet did do to help; to help Maxx's appetite he
gave me a powder that could be sprinkled on his food... for the life of me,
I wish I could remember the name of it. But it came in a spice-sized
plastic jar, was a golden-colored powder, and smelled good to me, just like
a mild spice that we would use on our food... and boy howdy... when I used
that on his food, he'd lap it up like it was gravy. Might want to ask your
vet about it. If you have trouble getting the name or a sample from your
vet, email me and I'll call my vet to see if he remembers the name of it.
His office used it for cats that were reluctant to eat.

About Omar being lethargic and sleeping a lot... Maxx would do the same
thing, almost like he would space out with his eyes open. We have an old
futon in our basement that he would escape to. At first I thought he was
trying to keep cool because the basement is unheated, but then I realized he
was trying to hide because of his illness... so I'd go down and spend a lot
time with him. Then, to try to keep Maxx out of the basement, I made him a
little nest type thingey so he could hide in upstairs where I could check on
him often. Take your sofa pillows and make a little house out of them by
resting one flat in the air, against the arm of the sofa, and the other
standing straight up, supporting the one in the air. Maxx loved his little
hidey-hole and it's simple to make. If you'd like to see a picture of Maxx,
he's in my PictureTail account link in my sig.

Sheri, my very best and most heartfelt wishes go out to you. I hope you can
spend as much time with Omar as possible - that will also help his stress
level. I know it made a difference with Maxx because after he died, his
cardiologist told me that I had had an extra month with him. He didn't
think Maxx would last 3 months, but I had 4 months with him. I understand
what you're going through and I care. If you ever want to talk more off the
group, I would be honored.

hugs,
Linda
Tucker-cat photos: http://www.picturetrail.com/bluemaxx
Cat Surgery Fund eBay auctions: http://search.ebay.com/_W0QQsassZtwolegs

> wrote in message
oups.com...
: Rhonda,
:
: I'll try the tuna juice idea. The only thing is that it probably
: contains a lot of sodium, which is bad for cats with heart disease.
: Still I know it's much worse for him to not eat and not get medication.
:
: Thanks so much,
:
: Sheri
:

Rhonda
January 12th 07, 05:41 AM
I'm glad you caught the sodium part -- it probably does have a lot of
salt. Hope you run that past the vet before you try it.

Good luck,

Rhonda

wrote:
> Rhonda,
>
> I'll try the tuna juice idea. The only thing is that it probably
> contains a lot of sodium, which is bad for cats with heart disease.
> Still I know it's much worse for him to not eat and not get medication.
>
> Thanks so much,
>
> Sheri
>