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eDog
January 18th 07, 05:54 PM
I have three cats and although I trimmed their nails in advance of
receiving a new leather sofa, I missed a few nails particlularly on the
young feisty one who struggles quite a bit when he is restrained.

After two days of owning the sofa a few scratches showed up and I think I
even saw one set of them being made. None of the scratching is intentional
but at the rate that the unintentional scratches are being made the sofa
and my marriage will be on the skids in record time.

I ordered Soft Paws, but have to tell you up front that I am skeptical
about the product. Most of the rave reviews seem to come from people who
just applied them.

I am even afraid that the SoftPaws will cause more damage than trimmed
nails.

So, has anybody out here had success with cats and leather furniture?

Rhonda
January 18th 07, 06:07 PM
eDog -- I think getting a leather sofa when you have cats is asking for
trouble.

Try the Softpaws, they may work. If they don't -- please don't punish
the cats with declawing because of your furniture choice. You have to
keep in mind that a living creature is worth more than a piece of furniture.

Rhonda

eDog wrote:
> I have three cats and although I trimmed their nails in advance of
> receiving a new leather sofa, I missed a few nails particlularly on the
> young feisty one who struggles quite a bit when he is restrained.
>
> After two days of owning the sofa a few scratches showed up and I think I
> even saw one set of them being made. None of the scratching is intentional
> but at the rate that the unintentional scratches are being made the sofa
> and my marriage will be on the skids in record time.
>
> I ordered Soft Paws, but have to tell you up front that I am skeptical
> about the product. Most of the rave reviews seem to come from people who
> just applied them.
>
> I am even afraid that the SoftPaws will cause more damage than trimmed
> nails.
>
> So, has anybody out here had success with cats and leather furniture?
>
>
>
>

Lynne
January 18th 07, 06:07 PM
on Thu, 18 Jan 2007 17:54:32 GMT, eDog > wrote:

> I have three cats and although I trimmed their nails in advance of
> receiving a new leather sofa, I missed a few nails particlularly on
> the young feisty one who struggles quite a bit when he is restrained.
>
> After two days of owning the sofa a few scratches showed up and I
> think I even saw one set of them being made. None of the scratching is
> intentional but at the rate that the unintentional scratches are being
> made the sofa and my marriage will be on the skids in record time.
>
> I ordered Soft Paws, but have to tell you up front that I am skeptical
> about the product. Most of the rave reviews seem to come from people
> who just applied them.
>
> I am even afraid that the SoftPaws will cause more damage than trimmed
> nails.
>
> So, has anybody out here had success with cats and leather furniture?
>

Reposting my response to you from the other thread you started--but first
I'll add that I have very nice Natuzzi butter leather furniture that I have
had since '95:

Trim their nails short and they will not damage it. There may be surface
scuffs, but unless they use your leather as a scratching post, they won't
tear it. The rivets on your blue jeans will cause more damage. Make sure
you have several tall scratching posts available for them to use and teach
them not to scratch the leather. It works in my house just fine.

You had the cats before you had the leather. Considering performing a
barbaric and cruel procedure on them to protect an inanimate object is
reprehensible. Just don't do it. Or, if you are still considering it, cut
your own fingers off between the last two knuckles first so you'll get an
idea of what it's like for a cat to be declawed.

--
Lynne

eDog
January 18th 07, 07:25 PM
The leather was obviously a mistake, but I made it with the best of
intentions.

I have an older and cheaper leather sofa and it simply does not show
scratches. It's kind of like a black basketball and the cats have no
interest in scratching it on purpose. Closer inspections reveals surface
scratches that are invisible to the eye at any distance.

The NEW SOFA is a completely different story.

The sofa isn't black but I tried to match the leather insofar as texture.
But whoa! The scratches started showing up immediately.

I'm opposed to declawing except as a last resort, but I am married to
someone with a different outlook.

This new sofa is going to cause grief.

I'm willing to clip their nails every other day if I have to (in the space
of three days the little feisty one is already flashing around a couple of
brand new razor blades).

I'm also willing to try Soft Paws, but if the stuff doesn't work I am going
to need to both replace the sofa and declaw the cats.

I have SoftPaws on order but my intuition is telling me that they may
actually be worse for the leather sofa than frequently trimmed nails.






Rhonda > wrote in news:45AFB6F6.7090500
@att.remove.net:

>
> eDog -- I think getting a leather sofa when you have cats is asking for
> trouble.
>



--
Looking for a clue.

cindys
January 18th 07, 07:48 PM
"eDog" > wrote in message
. ..

>
> I have SoftPaws on order but my intuition is telling me that they may
> actually be worse for the leather sofa than frequently trimmed nails.
----------
You'll be happy to hear that your intuition is completely wrong. Soft paws
are very soft and flexible. They are not hard plastic. They don't leave
marks on anything.
Best regards,
---Cindy S.

Edna Pearl
January 18th 07, 07:51 PM
Yeah, it's a problem, and I feel for you, but there are a lot of things you
can do short of torturing the poor kitty with cutting off part of its toes.
In addition to the measures already mentioned, can you also close doors
strategically? Put a throw over vulnerable areas of the sofa at least until
you've made some progress on training and trimming the cat's claws? My
sister-in-law is very house-proud (unlike me) but doesn't even trim her
cat's claws; she just puts throws over her vulnerable furniture.

Two-sided tape, or tape loops, can also train a cat to stay away from a
piece of furniture. The cat gets entangled in that sticky tape, goes
absolutely berserk getting free of it and then licking him/herself all over,
and then shuns that particular spot like a pestilence :-) (It's good
entertainment value, too!)

Good luck,
ep


"eDog" > wrote in message
. ..
> The leather was obviously a mistake, but I made it with the best of
> intentions.
>
> I have an older and cheaper leather sofa and it simply does not show
> scratches. It's kind of like a black basketball and the cats have no
> interest in scratching it on purpose. Closer inspections reveals surface
> scratches that are invisible to the eye at any distance.
>
> The NEW SOFA is a completely different story.
>
> The sofa isn't black but I tried to match the leather insofar as texture.
> But whoa! The scratches started showing up immediately.
>
> I'm opposed to declawing except as a last resort, but I am married to
> someone with a different outlook.
>
> This new sofa is going to cause grief.
>
> I'm willing to clip their nails every other day if I have to (in the space
> of three days the little feisty one is already flashing around a couple of
> brand new razor blades).
>
> I'm also willing to try Soft Paws, but if the stuff doesn't work I am
> going
> to need to both replace the sofa and declaw the cats.
>
> I have SoftPaws on order but my intuition is telling me that they may
> actually be worse for the leather sofa than frequently trimmed nails.
>
>
>
>
>
>
> Rhonda > wrote in news:45AFB6F6.7090500
> @att.remove.net:
>
>>
>> eDog -- I think getting a leather sofa when you have cats is asking for
>> trouble.
>>
>
>
>
> --
> Looking for a clue.

eDog
January 18th 07, 08:27 PM
I am going to call the furniture store and see how much replacement
cushions will cost and see if I can get my wife to agree to covering part
of the sofa while I work out the nail issue.

It's a small apartment and I can't keep the cats out of the living room.

They aren't interested in actually using the leather sofa as a scratching
post, but if it continues to get surface scratches like it already has it
will be a ruined piece of furniture and I will be facing ultimatums that
I would really like to avoid.

I came here looking for some advice from people with experience because I
can't really afford to bark up the wrong tree trying to fix this problem.


"Edna Pearl" > wrote in
:

> Yeah, it's a problem, and I feel for you, but there are a lot of
> things you can do short of torturing the poor kitty with cutting off
> part of its toes. In addition to the measures already mentioned, can
> you also close doors strategically?



--
It's the second mouse that gets the cheese!

Buddy's Mom
January 18th 07, 09:00 PM
I have had leather furniture for 30 years - 2 different sets - and cats
for that long. Even the cats who were front declawed [came that way
from the shelter] still scratched the leather with their back claws.

I have never tried the soft tips. My leather is black and I have tried
a black magic marker on the scratches - but it doesn't help a lot.

I think fabric furniture is even worse. My cats never used the leather
as a scratching post. It was always the back claws that scratched the
leather - just as they scratch wooden tables. My dining room table
received a long set of scratches the entire length on the day after
delivery. Even though the dear kitty wasn't allowed on tables.
Uggggggg............ You gotta love em......

eDog wrote:
> I am going to call the furniture store and see how much replacement
> cushions will cost and see if I can get my wife to agree to covering part
> of the sofa while I work out the nail issue.
>
> It's a small apartment and I can't keep the cats out of the living room.
>
> They aren't interested in actually using the leather sofa as a scratching
> post, but if it continues to get surface scratches like it already has it
> will be a ruined piece of furniture and I will be facing ultimatums that
> I would really like to avoid.
>
> I came here looking for some advice from people with experience because I
> can't really afford to bark up the wrong tree trying to fix this problem.
>
>
> "Edna Pearl" > wrote in
> :
>
> > Yeah, it's a problem, and I feel for you, but there are a lot of
> > things you can do short of torturing the poor kitty with cutting off
> > part of its toes. In addition to the measures already mentioned, can
> > you also close doors strategically?
>
>
>
> --
> It's the second mouse that gets the cheese!

Lynne
January 18th 07, 09:04 PM
on Thu, 18 Jan 2007 20:27:02 GMT, eDog > wrote:

> I am going to call the furniture store and see how much replacement
> cushions will cost and see if I can get my wife to agree to covering
> part of the sofa while I work out the nail issue.
>
> It's a small apartment and I can't keep the cats out of the living
> room.
>
> They aren't interested in actually using the leather sofa as a
> scratching post, but if it continues to get surface scratches like it
> already has it will be a ruined piece of furniture and I will be
> facing ultimatums that I would really like to avoid.
>
> I came here looking for some advice from people with experience
> because I can't really afford to bark up the wrong tree trying to fix
> this problem.

I suspect you aren't aware that if you declaw your cats, you run a very
high chance of having one or all them urinating inappropriately.
Personally even shredded fine leather would beat the hell out of a house
that smells like cat ****. But that's just me.

--
Lynne

cybercat
January 18th 07, 09:06 PM
"Buddy's Mom" > wrote

> Even the cats who were front declawed [came that way
> from the shelter] still scratched the leather with their back claws.
>

I had not thought of this. I would just live with the little holes
or get another kind of furniture.

It's only a couch, for God's sake. Ugh.

Lynne
January 18th 07, 09:10 PM
on Thu, 18 Jan 2007 21:06:47 GMT, "cybercat" > wrote:

> I had not thought of this. I would just live with the little holes
> or get another kind of furniture.

I guarantee they are not holes, or not many of them are. They are surface
scratches only, and it's a simple matter when buying new leather to scratch
gently with your finger nail to see if animal nails are going to leave
marks... Mine are covered with marks. Big whoop. I call them
"character."

> It's only a couch, for God's sake. Ugh.

No kidding. Any person who puts a freakin couch ahead of an animal is a
heartless, materialistic a-hole.

--
Lynne

Lynne
January 18th 07, 09:31 PM
on Thu, 18 Jan 2007 21:00:11 GMT, "Buddy's Mom" > wrote:

> My dining room table
> received a long set of scratches the entire length on the day after
> delivery. Even though the dear kitty wasn't allowed on tables.
> Uggggggg............ You gotta love em......

I have very little furniture that I consider "nice." My leather couches
and walnut wood tables in the living room have a lot of, ahem, character
from the cats. But my gorgeous solid cherry dining room table (the only
other nice piece I have) has HUGE scratches on it from, are you ready? a
dog. I brought my Ziggy (RIP) home from the hospital years ago because I
couldn't stand him being there anymore. I administered his subQ fluids and
other injections at home. For the fluids, I hung the bag over a pendant
light in the dining room and put him up on said table. Everytime I notice
those marks I think of my long gone, very loved dog.

It's just more character. If I really cared I'd get the top refinished...
I'd give away every piece of furniture I own to have him back. Pets and
furniture simply don't compare!


--
Lynne

Gail Futoran
January 18th 07, 10:50 PM
"Lynne" > wrote in message
. 97.142...
> on Thu, 18 Jan 2007 21:00:11 GMT, "Buddy's Mom" >
> wrote:
>
>> My dining room table
>> received a long set of scratches the entire length on the day after
>> delivery. Even though the dear kitty wasn't allowed on tables.
>> Uggggggg............ You gotta love em......
>
> I have very little furniture that I consider "nice." My leather
> couches
> and walnut wood tables in the living room have a lot of, ahem,
> character
> from the cats. But my gorgeous solid cherry dining room table (the
> only
> other nice piece I have) has HUGE scratches on it from, are you
> ready? a
> dog. I brought my Ziggy (RIP) home from the hospital years ago
> because I
> couldn't stand him being there anymore. I administered his subQ
> fluids and
> other injections at home. For the fluids, I hung the bag over a
> pendant
> light in the dining room and put him up on said table. Everytime I
> notice
> those marks I think of my long gone, very loved dog.
>
> It's just more character. If I really cared I'd get the top
> refinished...
> I'd give away every piece of furniture I own to have him back. Pets
> and
> furniture simply don't compare!
>
>
> --
> Lynne

I had a spayed Lilac Siamese who, at age 5,
decided to start marking furniture and books,
probably in response to a neighborhood stray
who was marking the patio door outside. By the
time we noticed, we had effectively lost a number
of books (some collectible), furniture that
eventually had to be tossed (one piece that my
husband had brought back from his USAF remote
tour in Korea), and upholstery had to be replaced.

She never really stopped doing it, but the other
two cats never picked up the nasty habit. She died
at age 16 in my arms of CRF.

Currently I have a 6 year old spayed Tonkinese
who is replicating my Siamese's habit! (She looks
like a Lilac Siamese - coincidence?) Fortunately
the other five cats haven't picked up on it, as far
as I can tell. And I'm spending a lot of time and
money with Mr. Feliway and Ms. Nature's Miracle.

I agree with Lynne. Pets first, furniture a distant
second.

Gail F.
Minya, Lao Ma, Ephiny, Melosa, Marcus, Gabby

eDog
January 18th 07, 11:41 PM
I tested the leather in the store as you say.

It was a poor predictor of how the leather fared.


Lynne > wrote in
. 97.142:

> and it's a simple matter when buying new leather to scratch
> gently with your finger nail to see if animal nails are going to leave
> marks...



--
Looking for a clue.

Rhonda
January 19th 07, 12:03 AM
eDog wrote:

> I'm opposed to declawing except as a last resort, but I am married to
> someone with a different outlook.
>
> This new sofa is going to cause grief.

I'm really sorry to hear that. You sound like a reasonable person -- at
least trying to find an answer. Living with someone who is so attached
to furniture would definitely be a stresser.

Say you give in and declaw the cats, and the cats pick up some of the
nasty habits that declawed cats do (many become biters because they've
lost one of their natural defenses.) What would become of the cats if
you solve the scratched sofa problem, but they now turn into little
demons? Would they have to go because of that reason?

Living on the edge like that would make me rethink the relationship.

> I'm willing to clip their nails every other day if I have to (in the space
> of three days the little feisty one is already flashing around a couple of
> brand new razor blades).
>
> I'm also willing to try Soft Paws, but if the stuff doesn't work I am going
> to need to both replace the sofa and declaw the cats.

I hope one of those methods work. Sounds like from what others have said
here -- it's the back claws that are the problem anyway, so declawing
may not make any difference.

> I have SoftPaws on order but my intuition is telling me that they may
> actually be worse for the leather sofa than frequently trimmed nails.

I hope that is wrong.

At any rate, how about getting a different sofa so that everyone in your
household is happy? You can probably advertise it and get a good price,
try Craigslist and other websites. I'll bet you can get a decent, new
sofa from the proceeds of an "almost-new" leather sofa.

You don't want to lose or deform the cats because of the furniture and I
suspect you want to stay with your partner, so maybe both of you need to
compromise.

Good luck to all of you,

Rhonda

KD
January 19th 07, 12:08 AM
eDog wrote:
> I have three cats and although I trimmed their nails in advance of
> receiving a new leather sofa, I missed a few nails particlularly on the
> young feisty one who struggles quite a bit when he is restrained.
>
> After two days of owning the sofa a few scratches showed up and I think I
> even saw one set of them being made. None of the scratching is intentional
> but at the rate that the unintentional scratches are being made the sofa
> and my marriage will be on the skids in record time.
>
> I ordered Soft Paws, but have to tell you up front that I am skeptical
> about the product. Most of the rave reviews seem to come from people who
> just applied them.
>
> I am even afraid that the SoftPaws will cause more damage than trimmed
> nails.
>
> So, has anybody out here had success with cats and leather furniture?

Another experience may be helpful: we lost our home and five kitties
in a forest fire several years ago that occurred while we were on
vacation. It was horrible! Believe me I haven't been going around
saying how much I miss my couch!

We now have three kitties, one leather couch, one leather chair. I
keep their nails trimmed, and we placed a board covered with carpet at
the end of the couch. They love to scratch on the board. I did put a
fleece throw over the arms of the couch, but we use them in the winter
anyway. Most of the inadvertant scratches are probably from *my*
nails, and my husband has yet to suggest I be declawed. ;>0 Most of
the scratches rub out of the kind of leather we have anyway. They
completely ignore the chair.

Trimming well and providing other outlets should take care of the
issue. To clip a wiggler, I often wrap in a towel, like a burrito,
with only the limb in question sticking out.

As for declawing, it can cause behavioral problems others have
outlined. Some come through it okay, some take to biting, some hate
digging in litter so don't cover (probably it's painful), and some stop
using the box. There's no guarantees.

Softpaws have worked for some, but I've never bothered, as my kitties
are family, and worth far more than any possession that I have. I
believed that before the fire, but it was certainly reinforced with the
pain of the loss.

Do the best you can- KD

Alan
January 19th 07, 01:33 AM
I would imagine you'll have as much success as having to, well lets say,
haul cinder blocks in the back of your Cadillac STS.

"eDog" > wrote in message
. ..
> I have three cats and although I trimmed their nails in advance of
> receiving a new leather sofa, I missed a few nails particlularly on the
> young feisty one who struggles quite a bit when he is restrained.
>
> After two days of owning the sofa a few scratches showed up and I think I
> even saw one set of them being made. None of the scratching is intentional
> but at the rate that the unintentional scratches are being made the sofa
> and my marriage will be on the skids in record time.
>
> I ordered Soft Paws, but have to tell you up front that I am skeptical
> about the product. Most of the rave reviews seem to come from people who
> just applied them.
>
> I am even afraid that the SoftPaws will cause more damage than trimmed
> nails.
>
> So, has anybody out here had success with cats and leather furniture?
>
>
>
>

Cheryl
January 19th 07, 02:47 AM
On Thu 18 Jan 2007 12:54:32p, eDog wrote in
rec.pets.cats.health+behav
>:

> So, has anybody out here had success with cats and leather
> furniture?

I've had a leather sectional for about 4 years, and I've found some
puncture wounds in it, but it's from my cats jumping on it, not
trying to scratch it like a scratching post, just as you describe. On
the spot (in the corner; it's a sectional, so the corner must be a
fun spot to play hide-n-seek) I just put a throw over the back of it
in that corner, and they pull it down sometimes, but I just put it
back when it see it down. I'm not too worried about it. Over these
years, the marks aren't really noticable.

--
Cheryl

cybercat
January 19th 07, 03:17 AM
"Cheryl" > wrote >

>Over these
> years, the marks aren't really noticable.
>
> --

Besides, truly fine, elegant pieces are just well-seasoned
by wear.

It's a nouveau riche, tacky attitude that dictates every fine thing
must remain untouched. Objects are there to make our lives better,
not harder.

Bryan S.
January 19th 07, 03:49 AM
[KD )]
[18 Jan 2007 16:08:03 -0800]

> To clip a wiggler, I often wrap in a towel, like a burrito,

Where do you find edible towels?

--
Bryan, Stacy, Alyssandra & James...

....under the watchful eyes of Her Majesty, Trouble (grey American
Shorthair)

eDog
January 19th 07, 04:40 AM
Thank you, Rhonda.

Rhonda > wrote in news:45B00A81.90309
@att.remove.net:

> Good luck to all of you,
>
> Rhonda
>
>



--
Looking for a clue.

January 19th 07, 09:55 PM
Hi,

Firstly, declawing shouldn't even be on the table here. You don't cut
off a child's fingers because they fingerpaint on the wall. That's a
boundary that needs to made right now. To solve the problem: invest in
*at least two* 48" tall sisal scratching posts. If you have space in
your home, I'd add a floor to ceiling cat tree as well.
When a cat tries scratching the sofa, pick it up gently, say no (don't
yell it) and redeposit the cat next to a scratching post. Put some
catnip on the posts regularly, and if you have to, get down there and
run your fingernails along it, or even the cat's paws to encourage
them.

I'd also get some Polartec throws and either leave one or two on the
couch itself during nothing special days (to encourage the cats to sit
on it rather than scratching it) or put them on OTHER less valuable
furniture to make it more comfortable and appealing to the cats than
the leather couch.

Here's a link to a good scratching post:
http://www.drsfostersmith.com/Product/Prod_Display.cfm?pcatid=10290&N=2002+113632

Polartec throws are easy to get and cheap - just look for soft and
fuzzy ones.

This is solvable if you put the energy in, don't be too anal about the
couch and just forget you everh heard the word declawing. It's
mutilation and torture - end of story.

Take care,

Tracy

On Jan 18, 9:54 am, eDog > wrote:
> I have three cats and although I trimmed their nails in advance of
> receiving a new leather sofa, I missed a few nails particlularly on the
> young feisty one who struggles quite a bit when he is restrained.
>
> After two days of owning the sofa a few scratches showed up and I think I
> even saw one set of them being made. None of the scratching is intentional
> but at the rate that the unintentional scratches are being made the sofa
> and my marriage will be on the skids in record time.
>
> I ordered Soft Paws, but have to tell you up front that I am skeptical
> about the product. Most of the rave reviews seem to come from people who
> just applied them.
>
> I am even afraid that the SoftPaws will cause more damage than trimmed
> nails.
>
> So, has anybody out here had success with cats and leather furniture?

eDog
January 20th 07, 07:12 AM
I need to get out of this thread before I say something stupid.

Thanks everybody for your helpful suggestions.I hope this thread is of
use to someone else in the future when they do a search on cats and
leather.

I personally wish I did a little more research on cats and leather via
the internet before I assumed my last sofa was a predictor of how the new
one would fare.

I can't garantee a happy ending for everyone at my end of the story, but
I cancelled the appointment I made to have the cats declawed and I intend
to spell out how I *love* the animals more than anything I own.

Once again, I have doubts about the SoftPaws I ordered:

Most of the rave reviews and testimonials I read seemed to be posted
immediately after successfully applying the toenail caps. On Amazon.com
however a couple of people conveyed horror stories involving cats that
chewed at the things until they harmed themselves and cats that got
caught in fabric or drapery with them on and were unable to free
themselves.

Your a great bunch of people. I'm going to lurk around the usenet group
for while.


" > wrote in
ups.com:

>
> This is solvable if you put the energy in, don't be too anal about the
> couch and just forget you everh heard the word declawing. It's
> mutilation and torture - end of story.
>
>

cybercat
January 20th 07, 08:10 PM
"eDog" > wrote in message
. ..

>
> I can't garantee a happy ending for everyone at my end of the story, but
> I cancelled the appointment I made to have the cats declawed and I intend
> to spell out how I *love* the animals more than anything I own.
>

Thank you, from the bottom of my heart. I chose to do this to a cat when
I was young, stupid as hell, and totally uninformed. (I thought it was just
like trimming nails, only permanent, had no idea about the mutilation of
the paws.) I took her in to be spayed, she was a stray and so beautiful.
The vet said, "do you want us to do a declaw too?" like it was a grooming
or something and idiot that I was, I said "yes." I have never, ever again
felt like I did when I got her home and saw what they had done to her
beautiful feet. She was never the same, and she never fully trusted me
again,
either.

You will not be sorry if you continue to refuse to allow this mutilation.
What goes around really does come around.