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Mike S.
January 21st 07, 05:56 AM
A few days ago I took my 8 y/o cat to the vet for a checkup and because
her teeth are really bothering her. She had a blood test done and
everything came back normal. Her teeth are in need of a cleaning so I
made an appointment for later this month.

It's been cold here recently (20's at night and 30's to lower 40's
during the day) so I turned the heating pad on in her cat house (she's
an outside only cat). Today I went to clean her house and I noticed the
pad/cover on her heating pad smelled of urine which would explain why
she wasn't in her house today. I smelled her head and it faintly
smelled of urine also.

What I'd like to know is why she would urinate in her house. I assume
it was her but it could've been a stray. I was planning on bringing her
in the house permanently after her dental cleaning but if she has a
problem urinating in the proper place than I might not (or at least
wait until her problem is fixed).

I'm wondering if she urinated in her house because it was too cold and
she didn't want to leave. Or maybe she was afraid to leave because of a
stray cat. Or maybe she has a problem and can't control her bladder.
Since her blood work came back normal it seems like she wouldn't have
any urinary problems such as crystals or any of that stuff. I'd really
like to figure out why this happened. Any ideas? It might not have even
been her, I don't know.



Also, I'd just like to say that her heating pad is safe and is always
set to the lowest temperature to enure that she doesn't get burned. She
used it all last winter and there was never any problems with it. I
also check it periodically to make sure nothing is wrong with it that
could harm her.

cybercat
January 21st 07, 06:48 AM
"Mike S." > wrote in message
ups.com...

>
> I'm wondering if she urinated in her house because it was too cold and
> she didn't want to leave.

Jesus. 20 to 30 degrees? I wonder.

Why is this cat "outdoor only?"

Who would do that to a cat in winter?

cybercat
January 21st 07, 06:49 AM
"Mike S." > wrote
>
> What I'd like to know is why she would urinate in her house. I assume
> it was her but it could've been a stray. I was planning on bringing her
> in the house permanently after her dental cleaning but if she has a
> problem urinating in the proper place than I might not (or at least
> wait until her problem is fixed).
>

Her problem is you. Take her to a shelter.

Mike S.
January 21st 07, 07:45 AM
cybercat wrote:
> "Mike S." > wrote
> >
> > What I'd like to know is why she would urinate in her house. I assume
> > it was her but it could've been a stray. I was planning on bringing her
> > in the house permanently after her dental cleaning but if she has a
> > problem urinating in the proper place than I might not (or at least
> > wait until her problem is fixed).
> >
>
> Her problem is you. Take her to a shelter.




Normally I would ignore a post like this (the kind where someone blames
me for something when they don't have all the facts) but I don't want
anyone else blaming me for something that isn't my fault.

If it were my choice this cat would've been in the house or at least in
a heated garage a long time ago. This is not my fault. If you want
someone to blame then you blame my asinine my parents, not me.

This cat used to have a heated garage to sleep in during the winter but
my father took that away from her because he's a selfish a-hole. My
parents won't allow another cat to come in the house but I'm working on
changing their minds. (By the end of the month I'm pretty sure she'll
be living in the house) If my parents had gotten this cat's mother
spayed years earlier like she should've been then this cat wouldn't be
here suffering the cold winter. What can I say, some people care more
about money than a living being.

While it might be very cold outside, at least this cat has a heated cat
house to go into. If this cat showed signs that the cold was affecting
her then I would do something ASAP. I check the cat periodically to
make sure she's ok and not developing frostbite or hypothermia. While
it might not be nice for a cat to be out in the cold weather they
should be ok as long as they have water, food, and a warm, dry,
adequate shelter. I even asked the vet about her being out in the cold
and explained the housing setup and he told me she should be fine.

Don't ever blame me (or anyone else) for something when you don't know
all the facts.


Now, could someone please help me out with this urinating problem. The
longer it takes to figure it out the longer she'll have to be out in
the cold. Even if you don't agree with me, at least help me out for the
cat's sake. Thank you.

Matthew
January 21st 07, 07:53 AM
Bloodwork won't always show a UTI or urinary tract infection. It could also
be a infection in her mouth if they need to be cleaned


"Mike S." > wrote in message
ups.com...
>A few days ago I took my 8 y/o cat to the vet for a checkup and because
> her teeth are really bothering her. She had a blood test done and
> everything came back normal. Her teeth are in need of a cleaning so I
> made an appointment for later this month.
>
> It's been cold here recently (20's at night and 30's to lower 40's
> during the day) so I turned the heating pad on in her cat house (she's
> an outside only cat). Today I went to clean her house and I noticed the
> pad/cover on her heating pad smelled of urine which would explain why
> she wasn't in her house today. I smelled her head and it faintly
> smelled of urine also.
>
> What I'd like to know is why she would urinate in her house. I assume
> it was her but it could've been a stray. I was planning on bringing her
> in the house permanently after her dental cleaning but if she has a
> problem urinating in the proper place than I might not (or at least
> wait until her problem is fixed).
>
> I'm wondering if she urinated in her house because it was too cold and
> she didn't want to leave. Or maybe she was afraid to leave because of a
> stray cat. Or maybe she has a problem and can't control her bladder.
> Since her blood work came back normal it seems like she wouldn't have
> any urinary problems such as crystals or any of that stuff. I'd really
> like to figure out why this happened. Any ideas? It might not have even
> been her, I don't know.
>
>
>
> Also, I'd just like to say that her heating pad is safe and is always
> set to the lowest temperature to enure that she doesn't get burned. She
> used it all last winter and there was never any problems with it. I
> also check it periodically to make sure nothing is wrong with it that
> could harm her.
>

cybercat
January 21st 07, 07:55 AM
"Mike S." > wrote
> Don't ever blame me (or anyone else) for something when you don't know
> all the facts.
>
>
> Now, could someone please help me out with this urinating problem. The
> longer it takes to figure it out the longer she'll have to be out in
> the cold. Even if you don't agree with me, at least help me out for the
> cat's sake. Thank you.
>

How can you possibly know when you have admitted a stray might
be doing it?

Meaning that your cat, out in the cold, then has nowhere to be at all.

Can't you find humane, decent people to live with? Or get a place of
your own?

Rhonda
January 21st 07, 08:39 AM
Mike,

I think there are 3 possibilities -- she's sick and can't hold it, it
was too cold, or it was another cat. If her head was wet too, maybe
another cat sprayed while she was in her bed.

Cats do not pee in their own bed for no reason, there might be an
illness the vet hasn't caught yet. Sometimes when the vets get in to do
a dental, they find more problems than they noticed on the first exam.
She should have a urinalysis too to check for a bacterial infection.

I'd work on your parents asap and hurry up the process of getting her
inside, even before her tooth cleaning. Sounds like she's in trouble,
even if the problem is another cat laying claim to her warm bed.

Let us know what happens,

Rhonda

Mike S. wrote:
> A few days ago I took my 8 y/o cat to the vet for a checkup and because
> her teeth are really bothering her. She had a blood test done and
> everything came back normal. Her teeth are in need of a cleaning so I
> made an appointment for later this month.
>
> It's been cold here recently (20's at night and 30's to lower 40's
> during the day) so I turned the heating pad on in her cat house (she's
> an outside only cat). Today I went to clean her house and I noticed the
> pad/cover on her heating pad smelled of urine which would explain why
> she wasn't in her house today. I smelled her head and it faintly
> smelled of urine also.
>
> What I'd like to know is why she would urinate in her house. I assume
> it was her but it could've been a stray. I was planning on bringing her
> in the house permanently after her dental cleaning but if she has a
> problem urinating in the proper place than I might not (or at least
> wait until her problem is fixed).
>
> I'm wondering if she urinated in her house because it was too cold and
> she didn't want to leave. Or maybe she was afraid to leave because of a
> stray cat. Or maybe she has a problem and can't control her bladder.
> Since her blood work came back normal it seems like she wouldn't have
> any urinary problems such as crystals or any of that stuff. I'd really
> like to figure out why this happened. Any ideas? It might not have even
> been her, I don't know.
>
>
>
> Also, I'd just like to say that her heating pad is safe and is always
> set to the lowest temperature to enure that she doesn't get burned. She
> used it all last winter and there was never any problems with it. I
> also check it periodically to make sure nothing is wrong with it that
> could harm her.
>

Buddy's Mom
January 21st 07, 12:03 PM
I agree with Rhonda. Another cat probably sprayed her while she was
sleeping in her house.

Rhonda wrote:
> Mike,
>
> I think there are 3 possibilities -- she's sick and can't hold it, it
> was too cold, or it was another cat. If her head was wet too, maybe
> another cat sprayed while she was in her bed.
>
> Cats do not pee in their own bed for no reason, there might be an
> illness the vet hasn't caught yet. Sometimes when the vets get in to do
> a dental, they find more problems than they noticed on the first exam.
> She should have a urinalysis too to check for a bacterial infection.
>
> I'd work on your parents asap and hurry up the process of getting her
> inside, even before her tooth cleaning. Sounds like she's in trouble,
> even if the problem is another cat laying claim to her warm bed.
>
> Let us know what happens,
>
> Rhonda
>
> Mike S. wrote:
> > A few days ago I took my 8 y/o cat to the vet for a checkup and because
> > her teeth are really bothering her. She had a blood test done and
> > everything came back normal. Her teeth are in need of a cleaning so I
> > made an appointment for later this month.
> >
> > It's been cold here recently (20's at night and 30's to lower 40's
> > during the day) so I turned the heating pad on in her cat house (she's
> > an outside only cat). Today I went to clean her house and I noticed the
> > pad/cover on her heating pad smelled of urine which would explain why
> > she wasn't in her house today. I smelled her head and it faintly
> > smelled of urine also.
> >
> > What I'd like to know is why she would urinate in her house. I assume
> > it was her but it could've been a stray. I was planning on bringing her
> > in the house permanently after her dental cleaning but if she has a
> > problem urinating in the proper place than I might not (or at least
> > wait until her problem is fixed).
> >
> > I'm wondering if she urinated in her house because it was too cold and
> > she didn't want to leave. Or maybe she was afraid to leave because of a
> > stray cat. Or maybe she has a problem and can't control her bladder.
> > Since her blood work came back normal it seems like she wouldn't have
> > any urinary problems such as crystals or any of that stuff. I'd really
> > like to figure out why this happened. Any ideas? It might not have even
> > been her, I don't know.
> >
> >
> >
> > Also, I'd just like to say that her heating pad is safe and is always
> > set to the lowest temperature to enure that she doesn't get burned. She
> > used it all last winter and there was never any problems with it. I
> > also check it periodically to make sure nothing is wrong with it that
> > could harm her.
> >

Lynne
January 21st 07, 04:23 PM
on Sun, 21 Jan 2007 11:03:51 GMT, "Buddy's Mom" > wrote:

> I agree with Rhonda. Another cat probably sprayed her while she was
> sleeping in her house.

That's what it sounds like to me, too.

Her house and bedding need to be cleaned with something that will oxidize
the urine, but that isn't going to solve the problem of the other cat.
Only bringing her indoors will do that.

Just in case it wasn't another cat, have the vet collect urine from her
while she is under anesthesia for her dental cleaning.

As to your parents, that's a tough situation. If they won't let you
bring her indoors, finding a new home for her is the kindest thing you
can do. First, talk to your parents about just keeping her in your room
at first. Be diplomatic about it. I had to keep my cat in my room
during a quarter in one of my college apartments because I had a roommate
who was allergic. My cat did fine even though that is obviously not
ideal. Your cat will certainly be better off with you in your room than
outside in the winter, especially since another cat is probably
tormenting her.

Good luck with your parents!

--
Lynne

January 22nd 07, 07:37 AM
Don't be a twerp. There are plenty of cats that live a nice happy
outdoor only life.

cybercat wrote:
> "Mike S." > wrote
> >
> > What I'd like to know is why she would urinate in her house. I assume
> > it was her but it could've been a stray. I was planning on bringing her
> > in the house permanently after her dental cleaning but if she has a
> > problem urinating in the proper place than I might not (or at least
> > wait until her problem is fixed).
> >
>
> Her problem is you. Take her to a shelter.

cybercat
January 22nd 07, 08:03 AM
> wrote in message
ups.com...
> Don't be a twerp. There are plenty of cats that live a nice happy
> outdoor only life.
>

Of course they do.

Charlie Wilkes
January 23rd 07, 12:39 AM
On Sat, 20 Jan 2007 22:45:43 -0800, Mike S. wrote:

> Now, could someone please help me out with this urinating problem. The
> longer it takes to figure it out the longer she'll have to be out in
> the cold. Even if you don't agree with me, at least help me out for the
> cat's sake. Thank you.

I doubt if anyone here can really figure it out. It's not normal cat
behavior to **** where they sleep, so it indicates a problem, but who
knows what problem?

I think the best you could do is find a friend who could take this cat in
and provide an indoor space for her, at least during the winter.

Good luck.

Charlie