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January 26th 07, 11:21 PM
Hello,

I have had Friskey Fred for about six years. He was a feral cat that I
found on a camping trip. He simply jumped in the car and decided to
come home with me. Initially, I tried to find him a suitable home, but
in each case he was returned to me after less than a month. He was
even kicked out of a fraternity house because of his destructive
behavior. He lived in a barn for awhile, but so antagonized the horses
that they grew nervous to the point of unridability. Eventually I
decided to keep him myself, despite the fact that he is just plain
rotten. Afterall, he is my rotten cat and is a surprizingly good
friend (despite his criminal record).

However, on Wednesday, a disturbing thing happened. Friskey Fred
attacked me. In the past, he has attacked veterinarians, an overly
aggressive boyfriend, the plumber, my landlord, a would-be burglar, a
few dogs, an evangelist, and several postal workers. However, he has
never been less than a gentle and loving pet with me, and so to be
attacked by him was pretty horrifying. You must understand, Friskey
Fred is a twenty pound shaggy-white monster, with yellow snake-like
eyes, pointy teeth, pointy claws, pointy ears, and a little pink
heart-shaped nose. For me it was like having that seven-foot tall mall
Easter Rabbit suddenly turn and sink his buck teeth into my arm. It
was terrifying and yet also surprising, and it made me realize how
dangerous this creature is.

The attack was seemingly unprovoked. All I was trying to do was to get
him out of my office so that I could close the door (he tends to
destroy computer equipment if left unsupervised). In response, he
launched at me with the serious intent to whoop my tail (if you know
what I mean). I managed to wrestle him off my head, and ran into the
kitchen hoping to grab my broom, a rolling pin, a iron skillet--
anything that could help me ward him off. Still he kept coming after
me, even breaking my broomstick in half. I ended up having to dump his
water dish on him, which seemed at least to settle the critter down
abit.

However, now it seems that the person/cat relationship has been
irrevokably damaged. He now refuses to sit with me when I am in my
office. He seems to have a grudge and wants nothing to do with me. He
is just this twenty pound ball of bad attitude that demands catfood.
He has even turned my other two cats against me (as paranoid and silly
as this sounds-- but it is quite clear that they now disapprove of me).
I want to throw him out the door and forget about him, but do not have
that kind of nature (besides, he would probabably find some way to reek
his vengence). I do not know what to do. Does anyone have any
suggestions on what to do when the person/cat relationship goes south?
What if he attacks again? Advice is appreciated.....

January 27th 07, 12:07 AM
Is Freddie boy neutered?
If no, you should get him snipped. Mellows him out and should help
with the aggressiveness. Plus that way he will not make more Freddies
(there are too many kittens now).

If he is neutered I am not sure what would make him snap. Cats can be
very odd and alien creatures (which is part of the allure, I think).

In any case examine any changes in foods. Allergies to foods can
cause behavior changes in people, especially kids, such as wheat
allergies (turns my neighbor's 8 year old into a screaming, chair
throwing maniac). There is every reason to believe that it may happen
with animals too.

Check for the presence of catnip (my cat is a mean drunk and I have to
keep catnip away from him).

Could he have gotten into any medicines or herbs? Perhaps there are
intestinal worms or parasites that are affecting his brain chemistry?
Or maybe he is just mental?? My roommate in college had a cat like
that (Sam - really insane and the only cat I ever met that I really did
not like). He was always like that and lived to be 18 and never
changed.

A Google search on psychosis in cats did not turn up much.

I did find a link for a Pet Aggression medicine from a Natural Herbs
company. I do not know if it works or if it is safe, you should check
with a vet. It is interesting that they use Chamomile as an
ingredient. Chamomile tea is a long-time aid for stress in people.

http://www.nativeremedies.com/petalive/aggression-formula-aggressive-behavior-dogs-cats.html

Because cats (and dogs too) react differently than humans with any
medications be suer to check with a vet (a phone call should do) to
make sure that anything that you give to him is safe for cats.

The bad news is this: He is pretty much unadoptable (if you take him to
a shelter he will be PTS) unless you can find someone who is willing to
take on such a problem. Perhaps a farmer where he can live outside
with little contact with people? Be SURE to not just dump him, that is
a death sentence for cats. Declawing will not help (it is horrible for
cats and makes them psychotic if they are not already that way -- makes
them into biters).

So to recap, neuter him, ask a vet about unbalanced cats, check out
some tea for him, and take a deep breath --- wish I could help more.


On Jan 26, 6:21 pm, wrote:
> Hello,
>
> I have had Friskey Fred for about six years. He was a feral cat that I
> found on a camping trip. ........... I do not know what to do. Does anyone have any
> suggestions on what to do when the person/cat relationship goes south?
> What if he attacks again? Advice is appreciated.....

Buddy's Mom
January 27th 07, 01:36 AM
I have a 5 year old Maine Coon who has sort of done the same thing to
my husband the other night. He attacked his arm 3 times leaving bite
marks and blood. This is the most loving kitty I have ever had! What
provokes this???I was sick with a stomach flu for 3 days prior to the
attack.Think the cat wanted to be the dominant male after being with me
all that time? He has stayed with me ever since the attack and not
done it again. But I am appalled!

On Jan 26, 7:07*pm, wrote:
> Is Freddie boy neutered?
> If no, you should get him snipped. *Mellows him out and should help
> with the aggressiveness. *Plus that way he will not make more Freddies
> (there are too many kittens now).
>
> If he is neutered I am not sure what would make him snap. Cats can be
> very odd and alien creatures (which is part of the allure, I think).
>
> In any case examine any changes in foods. * Allergies to foods can
> cause behavior changes in people, especially kids, such as wheat
> allergies (turns my neighbor's 8 year old into a screaming, chair
> throwing maniac). *There is every reason to believe that it may happen
> with animals too.
>
> Check for the presence of catnip (my cat is a mean drunk and I have to
> keep catnip away from him).
>
> Could he have gotten into any medicines or herbs? *Perhaps there are
> intestinal worms or parasites that are affecting his brain chemistry?
> Or maybe he is just mental?? *My roommate in college had a cat like
> that (Sam - really insane and the only cat I ever met that I really did
> not like). *He was always like that and lived to be 18 and never
> changed.
>
> A Google search on psychosis in cats did not turn up much.
>
> I did find a link *for a Pet Aggression medicine from a Natural Herbs
> company. *I do not know if it works or if it is safe, you should check
> with a vet. *It is interesting that they use Chamomile as an
> ingredient. *Chamomile tea is a long-time aid for stress in people.
>
> http://www.nativeremedies.com/petalive/aggression-formula-aggressive-...
>
> Because cats (and dogs too) react differently than humans with any
> medications be suer to check with a vet (a phone call should do) to
> make sure that anything that you give to him is safe for cats.
>
> The bad news is this: He is pretty much unadoptable (if you take him to
> a shelter he will be PTS) unless you can find someone who is willing to
> take on such a problem. *Perhaps a farmer where he can live outside
> with little contact with people? *Be SURE to not just dump him, that is
> a death sentence for cats. *Declawing will not help (it is horrible for
> cats and makes them psychotic if they are not already that way -- makes
> them into biters).
>
> So to recap, neuter him, ask a vet about unbalanced cats, check out
> some tea for him, and take a deep breath --- wish I could help more.
>
> On Jan 26, 6:21 pm, wrote:
>
>
>
> > Hello,
>
> > I have had Friskey Fred for about six years. *He was a feral cat that I
> > found on a camping trip. *........... I do not know what to do. *Does anyone have any
> > suggestions on what to do when the person/cat relationship goes south?
> > What if he attacks again? *Advice is appreciated.....- Hide quoted text -- Show quoted text -

January 27th 07, 01:38 AM
Look, it's been two days, not two years. For all you know, it's
redirected aggression
about something else entirely and isn't even about you. I wouldn't
personalize
it so much, although I know it must have been scary.

If you've had him for six years and he never attacked you before, then
this is
an aberration - if he wanted to attack you before - he had plenty of
opportunities.

Unless there is something medical going on that is throwing him off
mentally
(and perhaps a vet visit is in order when he's less ornery) than it
probably is
redirected aggression that focused on you and escalated when you fought
back
and will settle in a week or so. Or else he really, really, really
didn't want to leave
your office.

Even my mid-mannered well-socialized girl can hold a grudge for a few
days
after I displease her - the traumatized feral can go longer than that
after a
vet visit she wasn't in the mood for. It's not cat psychosis - it's
normal stuff for a
smart creature that lacks pack loyalty or much of a sense of
submission.

Don't dump the cat. Six years of being with you should be enough time
to earn
him another chance. He lost his temper and cats can't slam doors and
yell.
Like you said - he's your rotten cat.

And I'd guess that if the other cats aren't suddenly afraid of him -
and the event is
understandable to them - than nothing is wrong with him mentally and it
most likely
won't happen again. They would know instantly if he'd gone off his
rocker and
would be trying to protect you - and they aren't.




On Jan 26, 3:21 pm, wrote:
> Hello,
>
> I have had Friskey Fred for about six years. He was a feral cat that I
> found on a camping trip. He simply jumped in the car and decided to
> come home with me. Initially, I tried to find him a suitable home, but
> in each case he was returned to me after less than a month. He was
> even kicked out of a fraternity house because of his destructive
> behavior. He lived in a barn for awhile, but so antagonized the horses
> that they grew nervous to the point of unridability. Eventually I
> decided to keep him myself, despite the fact that he is just plain
> rotten. Afterall, he is my rotten cat and is a surprizingly good
> friend (despite his criminal record).
>
> However, on Wednesday, a disturbing thing happened. Friskey Fred
> attacked me. In the past, he has attacked veterinarians, an overly
> aggressive boyfriend, the plumber, my landlord, a would-be burglar, a
> few dogs, an evangelist, and several postal workers. However, he has
> never been less than a gentle and loving pet with me, and so to be
> attacked by him was pretty horrifying. You must understand, Friskey
> Fred is a twenty pound shaggy-white monster, with yellow snake-like
> eyes, pointy teeth, pointy claws, pointy ears, and a little pink
> heart-shaped nose. For me it was like having that seven-foot tall mall
> Easter Rabbit suddenly turn and sink his buck teeth into my arm. It
> was terrifying and yet also surprising, and it made me realize how
> dangerous this creature is.
>
> The attack was seemingly unprovoked. All I was trying to do was to get
> him out of my office so that I could close the door (he tends to
> destroy computer equipment if left unsupervised). In response, he
> launched at me with the serious intent to whoop my tail (if you know
> what I mean). I managed to wrestle him off my head, and ran into the
> kitchen hoping to grab my broom, a rolling pin, a iron skillet--
> anything that could help me ward him off. Still he kept coming after
> me, even breaking my broomstick in half. I ended up having to dump his
> water dish on him, which seemed at least to settle the critter down
> abit.
>
> However, now it seems that the person/cat relationship has been
> irrevokably damaged. He now refuses to sit with me when I am in my
> office. He seems to have a grudge and wants nothing to do with me. He
> is just this twenty pound ball of bad attitude that demands catfood.
> He has even turned my other two cats against me (as paranoid and silly
> as this sounds-- but it is quite clear that they now disapprove of me).
> I want to throw him out the door and forget about him, but do not have
> that kind of nature (besides, he would probabably find some way to reek
> his vengence). I do not know what to do. Does anyone have any
> suggestions on what to do when the person/cat relationship goes south?
> What if he attacks again? Advice is appreciated.....

January 27th 07, 03:12 PM
Hello and thank you for these responses. I don't think that I could
ever just ditch my Fred. Maybe this did have something to do with
the vet as I had been on the phone earlier trying to price out feline
denistry..... Maybe he understood the conversation.

-C

On Jan 26, 8:38 pm, " > wrote:
> Look, it's been two days, not two years. For all you know, it's
> redirected aggression
> about something else entirely and isn't even about you. I wouldn't
> personalize
> it so much, although I know it must have been scary.
>
> If you've had him for six years and he never attacked you before, then
> this is
> an aberration - if he wanted to attack you before - he had plenty of
> opportunities.
>
> Unless there is something medical going on that is throwing him off
> mentally
> (and perhaps a vet visit is in order when he's less ornery) than it
> probably is
> redirected aggression that focused on you and escalated when you fought
> back
> and will settle in a week or so. Or else he really, really, really
> didn't want to leave
> your office.
>
> Even my mid-mannered well-socialized girl can hold a grudge for a few
> days
> after I displease her - the traumatized feral can go longer than that
> after a
> vet visit she wasn't in the mood for. It's not cat psychosis - it's
> normal stuff for a
> smart creature that lacks pack loyalty or much of a sense of
> submission.
>
> Don't dump the cat. Six years of being with you should be enough time
> to earn
> him another chance. He lost his temper and cats can't slam doors and
> yell.
> Like you said - he's your rotten cat.
>
> And I'd guess that if the other cats aren't suddenly afraid of him -
> and the event is
> understandable to them - than nothing is wrong with him mentally and it
> most likely
> won't happen again. They would know instantly if he'd gone off his
> rocker and
> would be trying to protect you - and they aren't.
>
> On Jan 26, 3:21 pm, wrote:
>
>
>
> > Hello,
>
> > I have had Friskey Fred for about six years. He was a feral cat that I
> > found on a camping trip. He simply jumped in the car and decided to
> > come home with me. Initially, I tried to find him a suitable home, but
> > in each case he was returned to me after less than a month. He was
> > even kicked out of a fraternity house because of his destructive
> > behavior. He lived in a barn for awhile, but so antagonized the horses
> > that they grew nervous to the point of unridability. Eventually I
> > decided to keep him myself, despite the fact that he is just plain
> > rotten. Afterall, he is my rotten cat and is a surprizingly good
> > friend (despite his criminal record).
>
> > However, on Wednesday, a disturbing thing happened. Friskey Fred
> > attacked me. In the past, he has attacked veterinarians, an overly
> > aggressive boyfriend, the plumber, my landlord, a would-be burglar, a
> > few dogs, an evangelist, and several postal workers. However, he has
> > never been less than a gentle and loving pet with me, and so to be
> > attacked by him was pretty horrifying. You must understand, Friskey
> > Fred is a twenty pound shaggy-white monster, with yellow snake-like
> > eyes, pointy teeth, pointy claws, pointy ears, and a little pink
> > heart-shaped nose. For me it was like having that seven-foot tall mall
> > Easter Rabbit suddenly turn and sink his buck teeth into my arm. It
> > was terrifying and yet also surprising, and it made me realize how
> > dangerous this creature is.
>
> > The attack was seemingly unprovoked. All I was trying to do was to get
> > him out of my office so that I could close the door (he tends to
> > destroy computer equipment if left unsupervised). In response, he
> > launched at me with the serious intent to whoop my tail (if you know
> > what I mean). I managed to wrestle him off my head, and ran into the
> > kitchen hoping to grab my broom, a rolling pin, a iron skillet--
> > anything that could help me ward him off. Still he kept coming after
> > me, even breaking my broomstick in half. I ended up having to dump his
> > water dish on him, which seemed at least to settle the critter down
> > abit.
>
> > However, now it seems that the person/cat relationship has been
> > irrevokably damaged. He now refuses to sit with me when I am in my
> > office. He seems to have a grudge and wants nothing to do with me. He
> > is just this twenty pound ball of bad attitude that demands catfood.
> > He has even turned my other two cats against me (as paranoid and silly
> > as this sounds-- but it is quite clear that they now disapprove of me).
> > I want to throw him out the door and forget about him, but do not have
> > that kind of nature (besides, he would probabably find some way to reek
> > his vengence). I do not know what to do. Does anyone have any
> > suggestions on what to do when the person/cat relationship goes south?
> > What if he attacks again? Advice is appreciated.....- Hide quoted text -- Show quoted text -

barb
January 27th 07, 04:45 PM
A Siamese kitten that I bought from very reputable breeders in 1963 attacked
me several times when she grew up. If I came into the house with the smell
of another cat on me she attacked. Her bites were so deep they left black
and blue marks. Her black mood would last for about a day during which time
she wouldn't come near me and I was very afraid of her. One day I walked
into my closet after a bout with Motor Vehicles who wanted some original
form. I was angry and was hollering while I threw things around in that
closet trying to find the form. She attacked. Because I deeply loved her I
just had to put up with these scenes once or twice a year. The good news is
that she outgrew it after a few years.

--
Barb
Of course I don't look busy,
I did it right the first time.

January 29th 07, 06:46 PM
I agree with all the responses to your initial email. My Maine coon
(so far) hasn't attacked me, but I suffered for a number of years from
a reign of terror imposed by a female DSH of whom I was terribly fond.
The first time she attacked me was when I let a visiting vet in for
the cat's annual checkup. The cat went over to the vet to greet her,
then turned on a dime and leaped at and attacked ME, screaming and
growling. The vet (who wouldn't complete the examination, not
surprisingly) thought it was an example of redirected aggression --
the cat smelled the medicine-y odor of the vet's black case and went
ballistic out of fear (she'd always hated vet visits). She attacked me
several times over the next few years, always (seemingly) as a
response to something she feared -- an antiseptic smell, a loud noise,
another cat seen through the window.... All the vets I took her to
to try to resolve this had no answer for me -- they just thought it
was a fear response...to something..... One afternoon, though, I came
home from work and the cat wouldn't let me in the front door. As soon
as i opened it, she sprang at me, hissing and growling. She simply
wouldn't let me in the house. So I had to sleep elsewhere, at a
friend's house. The next morning she was still growling and tried to
spring at me when I opened the door. I was armed this time with a
blanket and threw it over her, at which point she quieted down. I
called the vet and asked for advice. They said to bring her in (if I
could), so I managed to tuck her up in the blanket I'd covered her
with and get her to the vet's where they recommended euthanizing her
because they couldn't get her out of the box I'd carried her in. They
thought at that point that she must have a brain tumor that was
provoking seizures (they thought the growling and biting behavior was
a form of seizure), and that there wasn't anything they could do for
her. Very sadly, I had to agree. I'd reached a point where I was
terrified that she'd turn on me and attack me, unprovoked -- or,
worse, attack a friend. And although it might be hard to believe, a 12-
pound hissing, growling, screaming, crazed animal is quite fearsome. I
had loved her so -- I was really heartbroken that there was no remedy
(surgery would cost $3K, an MRI $2K). In reviewing the case, the vet
thought that all the episodes of behavior change I'd witnessed in my
cat over the ten years I had her were probably due to a slow-growing
brain tumor (cats are prone to these, apparently). Anyhow, it's just
one more data point for you--and my sympathy, because diagnosis seems
to be pretty tricky. I always hoped each episode of terror was the
last so I could relax, but there was always another one, even if
months down the road. MRIs are so expensive (at least in my
geographical area) that I had to try to find a diagnosis without this
tool. Brain tumors are probably on the least likely end of the
spectrum, but I think they should be factored in as a possibility. (My
vet initially didn't consider brain abnormalities, but after a couple
of years he came around, as the literature on this phenomenon grew.)
The unpredictability of the attacks were what was the worst -- I
became convinced that I couldn't trust my cat without restraints, and
that's no kind of life for either of us. Sad.

I should mention that I tried a course of phenobarb for my kitty, but
I couldn't get her therapeutic on the medication -- she simply
wouldn't let me administer it, either orally or in pill form. But
that's another possible course of action, if you believe in it --
medication (diazepams or something like phenobarb if seizures are
suspected).

Wishing you lots of support --

Cindy (owner of MC "Radar")

On Jan 26, 6:21 pm, wrote:
> Hello,
>
> I have had Friskey Fred for about six years. He was a feral cat that I
> found on a camping trip. He simply jumped in the car and decided to
> come home with me. Initially, I tried to find him a suitable home, but
> in each case he was returned to me after less than a month. He was
> even kicked out of a fraternity house because of his destructive
> behavior. He lived in a barn for awhile, but so antagonized the horses
> that they grew nervous to the point of unridability. Eventually I
> decided to keep him myself, despite the fact that he is just plain
> rotten. Afterall, he is my rotten cat and is a surprizingly good
> friend (despite his criminal record).
>
> However, on Wednesday, a disturbing thing happened. Friskey Fred
> attacked me. In the past, he has attacked veterinarians, an overly
> aggressive boyfriend, the plumber, my landlord, a would-be burglar, a
> few dogs, an evangelist, and several postal workers. However, he has
> never been less than a gentle and loving pet with me, and so to be
> attacked by him was pretty horrifying. You must understand, Friskey
> Fred is a twenty pound shaggy-white monster, with yellow snake-like
> eyes, pointy teeth, pointy claws, pointy ears, and a little pink
> heart-shaped nose. For me it was like having that seven-foot tall mall
> Easter Rabbit suddenly turn and sink his buck teeth into my arm. It
> was terrifying and yet also surprising, and it made me realize how
> dangerous this creature is.
>
> The attack was seemingly unprovoked. All I was trying to do was to get
> him out of my office so that I could close the door (he tends to
> destroy computer equipment if left unsupervised). In response, he
> launched at me with the serious intent to whoop my tail (if you know
> what I mean). I managed to wrestle him off my head, and ran into the
> kitchen hoping to grab my broom, a rolling pin, a iron skillet--
> anything that could help me ward him off. Still he kept coming after
> me, even breaking my broomstick in half. I ended up having to dump his
> water dish on him, which seemed at least to settle the critter down
> abit.
>
> However, now it seems that the person/cat relationship has been
> irrevokably damaged. He now refuses to sit with me when I am in my
> office. He seems to have a grudge and wants nothing to do with me. He
> is just this twenty pound ball of bad attitude that demands catfood.
> He has even turned my other twocatsagainst me (as paranoid and silly
> as this sounds-- but it is quite clear that they now disapprove of me).
> I want to throw him out the door and forget about him, but do not have
> that kind of nature (besides, he would probabably find some way to reek
> his vengence). I do not know what to do. Does anyone have any
> suggestions on what to do when the person/cat relationship goes south?
> What if he attacks again? Advice is appreciated.....

January 29th 07, 07:52 PM
Hello,

It is funny that people assume that he is a Maine Coon cat because
that is what the vet says that he is. I must admit that I have been
trying hard to get back on speaking terms with him. I even got him
some anchovies, which helped a great deal. However, he did get some
revenge on me, which I think in his mind evened the score. He stole
my keys and hid them for the last three days. This morning I found
them buried in my other (the good) cat's litter box. Since I change
the boxes 1-2x/day he must have buried the keys in there last night.
Since then we have called a truce.

I hope that there is not something terribly wrong with him. He is
difficult, but I love the little critter. I will keep my eye on his
behavior.

Thank you,
C

On Jan 29, 1:46 pm, wrote:
> I agree with all the responses to your initial email. My Maine coon
> (so far) hasn't attacked me, but I suffered for a number of years from
> a reign of terror imposed by a female DSH of whom I was terribly fond.
> The first time she attacked me was when I let a visiting vet in for
> the cat's annual checkup. The cat went over to the vet to greet her,
> then turned on a dime and leaped at and attacked ME, screaming and
> growling. The vet (who wouldn't complete the examination, not
> surprisingly) thought it was an example of redirected aggression --
> the cat smelled the medicine-y odor of the vet's black case and went
> ballistic out of fear (she'd always hated vet visits). She attacked me
> several times over the next few years, always (seemingly) as a
> response to something she feared -- an antiseptic smell, a loud noise,
> another cat seen through the window.... All the vets I took her to
> to try to resolve this had no answer for me -- they just thought it
> was a fear response...to something..... One afternoon, though, I came
> home from work and the cat wouldn't let me in the front door. As soon
> as i opened it, she sprang at me, hissing and growling. She simply
> wouldn't let me in the house. So I had to sleep elsewhere, at a
> friend's house. The next morning she was still growling and tried to
> spring at me when I opened the door. I was armed this time with a
> blanket and threw it over her, at which point she quieted down. I
> called the vet and asked for advice. They said to bring her in (if I
> could), so I managed to tuck her up in the blanket I'd covered her
> with and get her to the vet's where they recommended euthanizing her
> because they couldn't get her out of the box I'd carried her in. They
> thought at that point that she must have a brain tumor that was
> provoking seizures (they thought the growling and biting behavior was
> a form of seizure), and that there wasn't anything they could do for
> her. Very sadly, I had to agree. I'd reached a point where I was
> terrified that she'd turn on me and attack me, unprovoked -- or,
> worse, attack a friend. And although it might be hard to believe, a 12-
> pound hissing, growling, screaming, crazed animal is quite fearsome. I
> had loved her so -- I was really heartbroken that there was no remedy
> (surgery would cost $3K, an MRI $2K). In reviewing the case, the vet
> thought that all the episodes of behavior change I'd witnessed in my
> cat over the ten years I had her were probably due to a slow-growing
> brain tumor (cats are prone to these, apparently). Anyhow, it's just
> one more data point for you--and my sympathy, because diagnosis seems
> to be pretty tricky. I always hoped each episode of terror was the
> last so I could relax, but there was always another one, even if
> months down the road. MRIs are so expensive (at least in my
> geographical area) that I had to try to find a diagnosis without this
> tool. Brain tumors are probably on the least likely end of the
> spectrum, but I think they should be factored in as a possibility. (My
> vet initially didn't consider brain abnormalities, but after a couple
> of years he came around, as the literature on this phenomenon grew.)
> The unpredictability of the attacks were what was the worst -- I
> became convinced that I couldn't trust my cat without restraints, and
> that's no kind of life for either of us. Sad.
>
> I should mention that I tried a course of phenobarb for my kitty, but
> I couldn't get her therapeutic on the medication -- she simply
> wouldn't let me administer it, either orally or in pill form. But
> that's another possible course of action, if you believe in it --
> medication (diazepams or something like phenobarb if seizures are
> suspected).
>
> Wishing you lots of support --
>
> Cindy (owner of MC "Radar")
>
> On Jan 26, 6:21 pm, wrote:
>
>
>
> > Hello,
>
> > I have had Friskey Fred for about six years. He was a feral cat that I
> > found on a camping trip. He simply jumped in the car and decided to
> > come home with me. Initially, I tried to find him a suitable home, but
> > in each case he was returned to me after less than a month. He was
> > even kicked out of a fraternity house because of his destructive
> > behavior. He lived in a barn for awhile, but so antagonized the horses
> > that they grew nervous to the point of unridability. Eventually I
> > decided to keep him myself, despite the fact that he is just plain
> > rotten. Afterall, he is my rotten cat and is a surprizingly good
> > friend (despite his criminal record).
>
> > However, on Wednesday, a disturbing thing happened. Friskey Fred
> > attacked me. In the past, he has attacked veterinarians, an overly
> > aggressive boyfriend, the plumber, my landlord, a would-be burglar, a
> > few dogs, an evangelist, and several postal workers. However, he has
> > never been less than a gentle and loving pet with me, and so to be
> > attacked by him was pretty horrifying. You must understand, Friskey
> > Fred is a twenty pound shaggy-white monster, with yellow snake-like
> > eyes, pointy teeth, pointy claws, pointy ears, and a little pink
> > heart-shaped nose. For me it was like having that seven-foot tall mall
> > Easter Rabbit suddenly turn and sink his buck teeth into my arm. It
> > was terrifying and yet also surprising, and it made me realize how
> > dangerous this creature is.
>
> > The attack was seemingly unprovoked. All I was trying to do was to get
> > him out of my office so that I could close the door (he tends to
> > destroy computer equipment if left unsupervised). In response, he
> > launched at me with the serious intent to whoop my tail (if you know
> > what I mean). I managed to wrestle him off my head, and ran into the
> > kitchen hoping to grab my broom, a rolling pin, a iron skillet--
> > anything that could help me ward him off. Still he kept coming after
> > me, even breaking my broomstick in half. I ended up having to dump his
> > water dish on him, which seemed at least to settle the critter down
> > abit.
>
> > However, now it seems that the person/cat relationship has been
> > irrevokably damaged. He now refuses to sit with me when I am in my
> > office. He seems to have a grudge and wants nothing to do with me. He
> > is just this twenty pound ball of bad attitude that demands catfood.
> > He has even turned my other twocatsagainst me (as paranoid and silly
> > as this sounds-- but it is quite clear that they now disapprove of me).
> > I want to throw him out the door and forget about him, but do not have
> > that kind of nature (besides, he would probabably find some way to reek
> > his vengence). I do not know what to do. Does anyone have any
> > suggestions on what to do when the person/cat relationship goes south?
> > What if he attacks again? Advice is appreciated.....- Hide quoted text -- Show quoted text -

January 31st 07, 06:38 PM
On Jan 29, 2:52 pm, wrote:
> Hello,
>
> It is funny that people assume that he is a Maine Coon cat because
> that is what the vet says that he is. I must admit that I have been
> trying hard to get back on speaking terms with him. I even got him
> some anchovies, which helped a great deal. However, he did get some
> revenge on me, which I think in his mind evened the score. He stole
> my keys and hid them for the last three days. This morning I found
> them buried in my other (the good) cat's litter box. Since I change
> the boxes 1-2x/day he must have buried the keys in there last night.
> Since then we have called a truce.
>
> I hope that there is not something terribly wrong with him. He is
> difficult, but I love the little critter. I will keep my eye on his
> behavior.
>
> Thank you,
> C
>
> On Jan 29, 1:46 pm, wrote:
>
>
>
> > I agree with all the responses to your initial email. My Maine coon
> > (so far) hasn't attacked me, but I suffered for a number of years from
> > a reign of terror imposed by a female DSH of whom I was terribly fond.
> > The first time she attacked me was when I let a visiting vet in for
> > the cat's annual checkup. The cat went over to the vet to greet her,
> > then turned on a dime and leaped at and attacked ME, screaming and
> > growling. The vet (who wouldn't complete the examination, not
> > surprisingly) thought it was an example of redirected aggression --
> > the cat smelled the medicine-y odor of the vet's black case and went
> > ballistic out of fear (she'd always hated vet visits). She attacked me
> > several times over the next few years, always (seemingly) as a
> > response to something she feared -- an antiseptic smell, a loud noise,
> > another cat seen through the window.... All the vets I took her to
> > to try to resolve this had no answer for me -- they just thought it
> > was a fear response...to something..... One afternoon, though, I came
> > home from work and the cat wouldn't let me in the front door. As soon
> > as i opened it, she sprang at me, hissing and growling. She simply
> > wouldn't let me in the house. So I had to sleep elsewhere, at a
> > friend's house. The next morning she was still growling and tried to
> > spring at me when I opened the door. I was armed this time with a
> > blanket and threw it over her, at which point she quieted down. I
> > called the vet and asked for advice. They said to bring her in (if I
> > could), so I managed to tuck her up in the blanket I'd covered her
> > with and get her to the vet's where they recommended euthanizing her
> > because they couldn't get her out of the box I'd carried her in. They
> > thought at that point that she must have a brain tumor that was
> > provoking seizures (they thought the growling and biting behavior was
> > a form of seizure), and that there wasn't anything they could do for
> > her. Very sadly, I had to agree. I'd reached a point where I was
> > terrified that she'd turn on me and attack me, unprovoked -- or,
> > worse, attack a friend. And although it might be hard to believe, a 12-
> > pound hissing, growling, screaming, crazed animal is quite fearsome. I
> > had loved her so -- I was really heartbroken that there was no remedy
> > (surgery would cost $3K, an MRI $2K). In reviewing the case, the vet
> > thought that all the episodes of behavior change I'd witnessed in my
> > cat over the ten years I had her were probably due to a slow-growing
> > brain tumor (cats are prone to these, apparently). Anyhow, it's just
> > one more data point for you--and my sympathy, because diagnosis seems
> > to be pretty tricky. I always hoped each episode of terror was the
> > last so I could relax, but there was always another one, even if
> > months down the road. MRIs are so expensive (at least in my
> > geographical area) that I had to try to find a diagnosis without this
> > tool. Brain tumors are probably on the least likely end of the
> > spectrum, but I think they should be factored in as a possibility. (My
> > vet initially didn't consider brain abnormalities, but after a couple
> > of years he came around, as the literature on this phenomenon grew.)
> > The unpredictability of the attacks were what was the worst -- I
> > became convinced that I couldn't trust my cat without restraints, and
> > that's no kind of life for either of us. Sad.
>
> > I should mention that I tried a course of phenobarb for my kitty, but
> > I couldn't get her therapeutic on the medication -- she simply
> > wouldn't let me administer it, either orally or in pill form. But
> > that's another possible course of action, if you believe in it --
> > medication (diazepams or something like phenobarb if seizures are
> > suspected).
>
> > Wishing you lots of support --
>
> > Cindy (owner of MC "Radar")
>
> > On Jan 26, 6:21 pm, wrote:
>
> > > Hello,
>
> > > I have had Friskey Fred for about six years. He was a feral cat that I
> > > found on a camping trip. He simply jumped in the car and decided to
> > > come home with me. Initially, I tried to find him a suitable home, but
> > > in each case he was returned to me after less than a month. He was
> > > even kicked out of a fraternity house because of his destructive
> > > behavior. He lived in a barn for awhile, but so antagonized the horses
> > > that they grew nervous to the point of unridability. Eventually I
> > > decided to keep him myself, despite the fact that he is just plain
> > > rotten. Afterall, he is my rotten cat and is a surprizingly good
> > > friend (despite his criminal record).
>
> > > However, on Wednesday, a disturbing thing happened. Friskey Fred
> > > attacked me. In the past, he has attacked veterinarians, an overly
> > > aggressive boyfriend, the plumber, my landlord, a would-be burglar, a
> > > few dogs, an evangelist, and several postal workers. However, he has
> > > never been less than a gentle and loving pet with me, and so to be
> > > attacked by him was pretty horrifying. You must understand, Friskey
> > > Fred is a twenty pound shaggy-white monster, with yellow snake-like
> > > eyes, pointy teeth, pointy claws, pointy ears, and a little pink
> > > heart-shaped nose. For me it was like having that seven-foot tall mall
> > > Easter Rabbit suddenly turn and sink his buck teeth into my arm. It
> > > was terrifying and yet also surprising, and it made me realize how
> > > dangerous this creature is.
>
> > > The attack was seemingly unprovoked. All I was trying to do was to get
> > > him out of my office so that I could close the door (he tends to
> > > destroy computer equipment if left unsupervised). In response, he
> > > launched at me with the serious intent to whoop my tail (if you know
> > > what I mean). I managed to wrestle him off my head, and ran into the
> > > kitchen hoping to grab my broom, a rolling pin, a iron skillet--
> > > anything that could help me ward him off. Still he kept coming after
> > > me, even breaking my broomstick in half. I ended up having to dump his
> > > water dish on him, which seemed at least to settle the critter down
> > > abit.
>
> > > However, now it seems that the person/cat relationship has been
> > > irrevokably damaged. He now refuses to sit with me when I am in my
> > > office. He seems to have a grudge and wants nothing to do with me. He
> > > is just this twenty pound ball of bad attitude that demands catfood.
> > > He has even turned my other twocatsagainst me (as paranoid and silly
> > > as this sounds-- but it is quite clear that they now disapprove of me).
> > > I want to throw him out the door and forget about him, but do not have
> > > that kind of nature (besides, he would probabably find some way to reek
> > > his vengence). I do not know what to do. Does anyone have any
> > > suggestions on what to do when the person/cat relationship goes south?
> > > What if he attacks again? Advice is appreciated.....- Hide quoted text -- Show quoted text -- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -

Hello,

Well, F.Fred did it again. I was trying to leave to go to work and
had to move him away from the door, which he did not like one bit. I
ended up throwing him outside in the snow for awhile. Since he is
pretty much an indoor cat, I thought that this might surprise him
enough to get him to cooperate. It did. He was a completely
different creature when I finally let him back inside again. I guess
this strategy works.

However, I am thinking that I might have to get rid of one of my male
cats, and that this is the source of Fred's aggression- (I have three,
2 males and a female). Earlier this year, Friskey Fred brought home a
kitten-- (Fred is neutered by the way, and so I think that the kitten
was part of a little feral litter that lived in the woods behind my
apartment) . I tried to get the little guy a home, but to no avail.
Also, Friskey seemed attached to the kitten and would not give him up
easily. I ended up keeping this other cat (Garth), and recently got
him neutered (which I think is how the trouble started). Before I got
Garth neutered, his presence improved Friskey's behavior, and indeed,
he took responsibility for the kitten, (training him to use the litter
box, washing his ears.. etc.). It was like having the extra
responsibility made F.Fred act more mature. Now, it is almost like
F.Fred sees Garth as an intrusion, but is still very much attached to
him-- (they tend to follow each other around). So I guess he sees me
as the more reasonable target.

I also am attached to Garth. He is everything that F.Fred is not-
warm, cuddly, sweet. I try not to show favoritism, but it is really
nice to sit with Garth and Alice, and not so nice to sit with
Friskey. I do not want to get rid of any cat. Also, I owe Friskey
some loyalty. While his behavior has never been good, he has been
with me through thick and thin (mostly thin). However, I also realize
that he might never get back to the point where he is my buddy again.

Any advice? Strategies?

Losing my friend like this has been very disturbing.

-Christina

P.S. I did take F. Fred to the vet, who diagnosed him as "Rotten Cat".

February 1st 07, 12:03 AM
On Jan 31, 1:38 pm, wrote:
> On Jan 29, 2:52 pm, wrote:
>
>
>
>
>
> > Hello,
>
> > It is funny that people assume that he is a Maine Coon cat because
> > that is what the vet says that he is. I must admit that I have been
> > trying hard to get back on speaking terms with him. I even got him
> > some anchovies, which helped a great deal. However, he did get some
> > revenge on me, which I think in his mind evened the score. He stole
> > my keys and hid them for the last three days. This morning I found
> > them buried in my other (the good) cat's litter box. Since I change
> > the boxes 1-2x/day he must have buried the keys in there last night.
> > Since then we have called a truce.
>
> > I hope that there is not something terribly wrong with him. He is
> > difficult, but I love the little critter. I will keep my eye on his
> > behavior.
>
> > Thank you,
> > C
>
> > On Jan 29, 1:46 pm, wrote:
>
> > > I agree with all the responses to your initial email. My Maine coon
> > > (so far) hasn't attacked me, but I suffered for a number of years from
> > > a reign of terror imposed by a female DSH of whom I was terribly fond.
> > > The first time she attacked me was when I let a visiting vet in for
> > > the cat's annual checkup. The cat went over to the vet to greet her,
> > > then turned on a dime and leaped at and attacked ME, screaming and
> > > growling. The vet (who wouldn't complete the examination, not
> > > surprisingly) thought it was an example of redirected aggression --
> > > the cat smelled the medicine-y odor of the vet's black case and went
> > > ballistic out of fear (she'd always hated vet visits). She attacked me
> > > several times over the next few years, always (seemingly) as a
> > > response to something she feared -- an antiseptic smell, a loud noise,
> > > another cat seen through the window.... All the vets I took her to
> > > to try to resolve this had no answer for me -- they just thought it
> > > was a fear response...to something..... One afternoon, though, I came
> > > home from work and the cat wouldn't let me in the front door. As soon
> > > as i opened it, she sprang at me, hissing and growling. She simply
> > > wouldn't let me in the house. So I had to sleep elsewhere, at a
> > > friend's house. The next morning she was still growling and tried to
> > > spring at me when I opened the door. I was armed this time with a
> > > blanket and threw it over her, at which point she quieted down. I
> > > called the vet and asked for advice. They said to bring her in (if I
> > > could), so I managed to tuck her up in the blanket I'd covered her
> > > with and get her to the vet's where they recommended euthanizing her
> > > because they couldn't get her out of the box I'd carried her in. They
> > > thought at that point that she must have a brain tumor that was
> > > provoking seizures (they thought the growling and biting behavior was
> > > a form of seizure), and that there wasn't anything they could do for
> > > her. Very sadly, I had to agree. I'd reached a point where I was
> > > terrified that she'd turn on me and attack me, unprovoked -- or,
> > > worse, attack a friend. And although it might be hard to believe, a 12-
> > > pound hissing, growling, screaming, crazed animal is quite fearsome. I
> > > had loved her so -- I was really heartbroken that there was no remedy
> > > (surgery would cost $3K, an MRI $2K). In reviewing the case, the vet
> > > thought that all the episodes of behavior change I'd witnessed in my
> > > cat over the ten years I had her were probably due to a slow-growing
> > > brain tumor (cats are prone to these, apparently). Anyhow, it's just
> > > one more data point for you--and my sympathy, because diagnosis seems
> > > to be pretty tricky. I always hoped each episode of terror was the
> > > last so I could relax, but there was always another one, even if
> > > months down the road. MRIs are so expensive (at least in my
> > > geographical area) that I had to try to find a diagnosis without this
> > > tool. Brain tumors are probably on the least likely end of the
> > > spectrum, but I think they should be factored in as a possibility. (My
> > > vet initially didn't consider brain abnormalities, but after a couple
> > > of years he came around, as the literature on this phenomenon grew.)
> > > The unpredictability of the attacks were what was the worst -- I
> > > became convinced that I couldn't trust my cat without restraints, and
> > > that's no kind of life for either of us. Sad.
>
> > > I should mention that I tried a course of phenobarb for my kitty, but
> > > I couldn't get her therapeutic on the medication -- she simply
> > > wouldn't let me administer it, either orally or in pill form. But
> > > that's another possible course of action, if you believe in it --
> > > medication (diazepams or something like phenobarb if seizures are
> > > suspected).
>
> > > Wishing you lots of support --
>
> > > Cindy (owner of MC "Radar")
>
> > > On Jan 26, 6:21 pm, wrote:
>
> > > > Hello,
>
> > > > I have had Friskey Fred for about six years. He was a feral cat that I
> > > > found on a camping trip. He simply jumped in the car and decided to
> > > > come home with me. Initially, I tried to find him a suitable home, but
> > > > in each case he was returned to me after less than a month. He was
> > > > even kicked out of a fraternity house because of his destructive
> > > > behavior. He lived in a barn for awhile, but so antagonized the horses
> > > > that they grew nervous to the point of unridability. Eventually I
> > > > decided to keep him myself, despite the fact that he is just plain
> > > > rotten. Afterall, he is my rotten cat and is a surprizingly good
> > > > friend (despite his criminal record).
>
> > > > However, on Wednesday, a disturbing thing happened. Friskey Fred
> > > > attacked me. In the past, he has attacked veterinarians, an overly
> > > > aggressive boyfriend, the plumber, my landlord, a would-be burglar, a
> > > > few dogs, an evangelist, and several postal workers. However, he has
> > > > never been less than a gentle and loving pet with me, and so to be
> > > > attacked by him was pretty horrifying. You must understand, Friskey
> > > > Fred is a twenty pound shaggy-white monster, with yellow snake-like
> > > > eyes, pointy teeth, pointy claws, pointy ears, and a little pink
> > > > heart-shaped nose. For me it was like having that seven-foot tall mall
> > > > Easter Rabbit suddenly turn and sink his buck teeth into my arm. It
> > > > was terrifying and yet also surprising, and it made me realize how
> > > > dangerous this creature is.
>
> > > > The attack was seemingly unprovoked. All I was trying to do was to get
> > > > him out of my office so that I could close the door (he tends to
> > > > destroy computer equipment if left unsupervised). In response, he
> > > > launched at me with the serious intent to whoop my tail (if you know
> > > > what I mean). I managed to wrestle him off my head, and ran into the
> > > > kitchen hoping to grab my broom, a rolling pin, a iron skillet--
> > > > anything that could help me ward him off. Still he kept coming after
> > > > me, even breaking my broomstick in half. I ended up having to dump his
> > > > water dish on him, which seemed at least to settle the critter down
> > > > abit.
>
> > > > However, now it seems that the person/cat relationship has been
> > > > irrevokably damaged. He now refuses to sit with me when I am in my
> > > > office. He seems to have a grudge and wants nothing to do with me. He
> > > > is just this twenty pound ball of bad attitude that demands catfood.
> > > > He has even turned my other twocatsagainst me (as paranoid and silly
> > > > as this sounds-- but it is quite clear that they now disapprove of me).
> > > > I want to throw him out the door and forget about him, but do not have
> > > > that kind of nature (besides, he would probabably find some way to reek
> > > > his vengence). I do not know what to do. Does anyone have any
> > > > suggestions on what to do when the person/cat relationship goes south?
> > > > What if he attacks again? Advice is appreciated.....- Hide quoted text -- Show quoted text -- Hide quoted text -
>
> > - Show quoted text -
>
> Hello,
>
> Well, F.Fred did it again. I was trying to leave to go to work and
> had to move him away from the door, which he did not like one bit. I
> ended up throwing him outside in the snow for awhile. Since he is
> pretty much an indoor cat, I thought that this might surprise him
> enough to get him to cooperate. It did. He was a completely
> different creature when I finally let him back inside again. I guess
> this strategy works.
>
> However, I am thinking that I might have to get rid of one of my male
> cats, and that this is the source of Fred's aggression- (I have three,
> 2 males and a female). Earlier this year, Friskey Fred brought home a
> kitten-- (Fred is neutered by the way, and so I think that the kitten
> was part of a little feral litter that lived in the woods behind my
> apartment) . I tried to get the little guy a home, but to no avail.
> Also, Friskey seemed attached to the kitten and would not give him up
> easily. I ended up keeping this other cat (Garth), and recently got
> him neutered (which I think is how the trouble started). Before I got
> Garth neutered, his presence improved Friskey's behavior, and indeed,
> he took responsibility for the kitten, (training him to use the litter
> box, washing his ears.. etc.). It was like having the extra
> responsibility made F.Fred act more mature. Now, it is almost like
> F.Fred sees Garth as an intrusion, but is still very much attached to
> him-- (they tend to follow each other around). So I guess he sees me
> as the more reasonable target.
>
> I also am attached to Garth. He is everything that F.Fred is not-
> warm, cuddly, sweet. I try not to show favoritism, but it is really
> nice to sit with Garth and Alice, and not so nice to sit with
> Friskey. I do not want to get rid of any cat. Also, I owe Friskey
> some loyalty. While his behavior has never been good, he has been
> with me through thick and thin (mostly thin). However, I also realize
> that he might never get ...
>
> read more - Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -


Hello,

I got some email, and so wanted to clarify that although I complain
about him, I would not get rid of F. Fred under any circumstances. He
is an intelligent and sensitive animal and I really want to work
through this with him. I would never just ditch him because he is my
friend and is extremely loyal. Also, if I need to part with Garth, it
will be to an extraordinary home.

Regards,
Christina

February 6th 07, 06:35 PM
On Jan 31, 7:03 pm, wrote:
> On Jan 31, 1:38 pm, wrote:
>
> > On Jan 29, 2:52 pm, wrote:
>
> > > Hello,
>
> > > It is funny that people assume that he is a Maine Coon cat because
> > > that is what the vet says that he is. I must admit that I have been
> > > trying hard to get back on speaking terms with him. I even got him
> > > some anchovies, which helped a great deal. However, he did get some
> > > revenge on me, which I think in his mind evened the score. He stole
> > > my keys and hid them for the last three days. This morning I found
> > > them buried in my other (the good) cat's litter box. Since I change
> > > the boxes 1-2x/day he must have buried the keys in there last night.
> > > Since then we have called a truce.
>
> > > I hope that there is not something terribly wrong with him. He is
> > > difficult, but I love the little critter. I will keep my eye on his
> > > behavior.
>
> > > Thank you,
> > > C
>
> > > On Jan 29, 1:46 pm, wrote:
>
> > > > I agree with all the responses to your initial email. My Maine coon
> > > > (so far) hasn't attacked me, but I suffered for a number of years from
> > > > a reign of terror imposed by a female DSH of whom I was terribly fond.
> > > > The first time she attacked me was when I let a visiting vet in for
> > > > the cat's annual checkup. The cat went over to the vet to greet her,
> > > > then turned on a dime and leaped at and attacked ME, screaming and
> > > > growling. The vet (who wouldn't complete the examination, not
> > > > surprisingly) thought it was an example of redirected aggression --
> > > > the cat smelled the medicine-y odor of the vet's black case and went
> > > > ballistic out of fear (she'd always hated vet visits). She attacked me
> > > > several times over the next few years, always (seemingly) as a
> > > > response to something she feared -- an antiseptic smell, a loud noise,
> > > > another cat seen through the window.... All the vets I took her to
> > > > to try to resolve this had no answer for me -- they just thought it
> > > > was a fear response...to something..... One afternoon, though, I came
> > > > home from work and the cat wouldn't let me in the front door. As soon
> > > > as i opened it, she sprang at me, hissing and growling. She simply
> > > > wouldn't let me in the house. So I had to sleep elsewhere, at a
> > > > friend's house. The next morning she was still growling and tried to
> > > > spring at me when I opened the door. I was armed this time with a
> > > > blanket and threw it over her, at which point she quieted down. I
> > > > called the vet and asked for advice. They said to bring her in (if I
> > > > could), so I managed to tuck her up in the blanket I'd covered her
> > > > with and get her to the vet's where they recommended euthanizing her
> > > > because they couldn't get her out of the box I'd carried her in. They
> > > > thought at that point that she must have a brain tumor that was
> > > > provoking seizures (they thought the growling and biting behavior was
> > > > a form of seizure), and that there wasn't anything they could do for
> > > > her. Very sadly, I had to agree. I'd reached a point where I was
> > > > terrified that she'd turn on me and attack me, unprovoked -- or,
> > > > worse, attack a friend. And although it might be hard to believe, a 12-
> > > > pound hissing, growling, screaming, crazed animal is quite fearsome.. I
> > > > had loved her so -- I was really heartbroken that there was no remedy
> > > > (surgery would cost $3K, an MRI $2K). In reviewing the case, the vet
> > > > thought that all the episodes of behavior change I'd witnessed in my
> > > > cat over the ten years I had her were probably due to a slow-growing
> > > > brain tumor (cats are prone to these, apparently). Anyhow, it's just
> > > > one more data point for you--and my sympathy, because diagnosis seems
> > > > to be pretty tricky. I always hoped each episode of terror was the
> > > > last so I could relax, but there was always another one, even if
> > > > months down the road. MRIs are so expensive (at least in my
> > > > geographical area) that I had to try to find a diagnosis without this
> > > > tool. Brain tumors are probably on the least likely end of the
> > > > spectrum, but I think they should be factored in as a possibility. (My
> > > > vet initially didn't consider brain abnormalities, but after a couple
> > > > of years he came around, as the literature on this phenomenon grew.)
> > > > The unpredictability of the attacks were what was the worst -- I
> > > > became convinced that I couldn't trust my cat without restraints, and
> > > > that's no kind of life for either of us. Sad.
>
> > > > I should mention that I tried a course of phenobarb for my kitty, but
> > > > I couldn't get her therapeutic on the medication -- she simply
> > > > wouldn't let me administer it, either orally or in pill form. But
> > > > that's another possible course of action, if you believe in it --
> > > > medication (diazepams or something like phenobarb if seizures are
> > > > suspected).
>
> > > > Wishing you lots of support --
>
> > > > Cindy (owner of MC "Radar")
>
> > > > On Jan 26, 6:21 pm, wrote:
>
> > > > > Hello,
>
> > > > > I have had Friskey Fred for about six years. He was a feral cat that I
> > > > > found on a camping trip. He simply jumped in the car and decided to
> > > > > come home with me. Initially, I tried to find him a suitable home, but
> > > > > in each case he was returned to me after less than a month. He was
> > > > > even kicked out of a fraternity house because of his destructive
> > > > > behavior. He lived in a barn for awhile, but so antagonized the horses
> > > > > that they grew nervous to the point of unridability. Eventually I
> > > > > decided to keep him myself, despite the fact that he is just plain
> > > > > rotten. Afterall, he is my rotten cat and is a surprizingly good
> > > > > friend (despite his criminal record).
>
> > > > > However, on Wednesday, a disturbing thing happened. Friskey Fred
> > > > > attacked me. In the past, he has attacked veterinarians, an overly
> > > > > aggressive boyfriend, the plumber, my landlord, a would-be burglar, a
> > > > > few dogs, an evangelist, and several postal workers. However, he has
> > > > > never been less than a gentle and loving pet with me, and so to be
> > > > > attacked by him was pretty horrifying. You must understand, Friskey
> > > > > Fred is a twenty pound shaggy-white monster, with yellow snake-like
> > > > > eyes, pointy teeth, pointy claws, pointy ears, and a little pink
> > > > > heart-shaped nose. For me it was like having that seven-foot tall mall
> > > > > Easter Rabbit suddenly turn and sink his buck teeth into my arm. It
> > > > > was terrifying and yet also surprising, and it made me realize how
> > > > > dangerous this creature is.
>
> > > > > The attack was seemingly unprovoked. All I was trying to do was to get
> > > > > him out of my office so that I could close the door (he tends to
> > > > > destroy computer equipment if left unsupervised). In response, he
> > > > > launched at me with the serious intent to whoop my tail (if you know
> > > > > what I mean). I managed to wrestle him off my head, and ran into the
> > > > > kitchen hoping to grab my broom, a rolling pin, a iron skillet--
> > > > > anything that could help me ward him off. Still he kept coming after
> > > > > me, even breaking my broomstick in half. I ended up having to dump his
> > > > > water dish on him, which seemed at least to settle the critter down
> > > > > abit.
>
> > > > > However, now it seems that the person/cat relationship has been
> > > > > irrevokably damaged. He now refuses to sit with me when I am in my
> > > > > office. He seems to have a grudge and wants nothing to do with me. He
> > > > > is just this twenty pound ball of bad attitude that demands catfood.
> > > > > He has even turned my other twocatsagainst me (as paranoid and silly
> > > > > as this sounds-- but it is quite clear that they now disapprove of me).
> > > > > I want to throw him out the door and forget about him, but do not have
> > > > > that kind of nature (besides, he would probabably find some way to reek
> > > > > his vengence). I do not know what to do. Does anyone have any
> > > > > suggestions on what to do when the person/cat relationship goes south?
> > > > > What if he attacks again? Advice is appreciated.....- Hide quoted text -- Show quoted text -- Hide quoted text -
>
> > > - Show quoted text -
>
> > Hello,
>
> > Well, F.Fred did it again. I was trying to leave to go to work and
> > had to move him away from the door, which he did not like one bit. I
> > ended up throwing him outside in the snow for awhile. Since he is
> > pretty much an indoor cat, I thought that this might surprise him
> > enough to get him to cooperate. It did. He was a completely
> > different creature when I finally let him back inside again. I guess
> > this strategy works.
>
> > However, I am thinking that I might have to get rid of one of my male
> > cats, and that this is the source of Fred's aggression- (I have three,
> > 2 males and a female). Earlier this year, Friskey Fred brought home a
> > kitten-- (Fred is neutered by the way, and so I think that the kitten
> > was part of a little feral litter that lived in the woods behind my
> > apartment) . I tried to get the little guy a home, but to no avail.
> > Also, Friskey seemed attached to the kitten and would not give him up
> > easily. I ended up keeping this other cat (Garth), and recently got
> > him neutered (which I think is how the trouble started). Before I got
> > Garth neutered, his presence improved Friskey's behavior, and indeed,
> > he took responsibility for the kitten, (training him to use the litter
> > box, washing his ears.. etc.). It was like having the extra
> > responsibility made F.Fred act more mature. Now, it is almost like
> > F.Fred sees Garth as an intrusion, but is still very much attached to
> > him-- (they tend to follow each other around). So I guess he sees me
> > as the more reasonable target.
>
> > I also am attached to Garth. He is everything that F.Fred is not-
> > warm, cuddly, sweet. I try not to show favoritism, but it is really
> > nice to sit with Garth and Alice, and not so nice to sit with
> > Friskey. I do not want to get rid of any cat. Also, I owe Friskey
> > some loyalty. While his behavior has never been good, he has been
> > with me through thick and thin (mostly thin). However, I also realize
> > that he might never get ...
>
> > read more - Hide quoted text -
>
> > - Show quoted text -
>
> Hello,
>
> I got some email, and so wanted to clarify that although I complain
> about him, I would not get rid of F. Fred under any circumstances. He
> is an intelligent and sensitive animal and I really want to work
> through this with him. I would never just ditch him because he is my
> friend and is extremely loyal. Also, if I need to part with Garth, it
> will be to an extraordinary home.
>
> Regards,
> Christina

Hello,

I left town for a couple of days on business. One of my friends came
in daily to feed Frisky. When I told her how bad he was behaving and
that she should just stay away from him, she decided to give him extra
attention instead. The result is that his behavior was perfect while
I was away, so much so that he earned a trip to PetSmart. When I
returned home he was a nicer cat and once things get warmer around
here, he is definitely getting his field trip.... I guess the moral
of the story is that a little love and compassion goes a long way...

Warm regards,
Christina