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January 28th 07, 08:11 AM
I've got two cats, age 10 1/2, and I'd like to keep it that way.

My wife won't let them sleep with us, and, after an inappropriate
urination incident, also requires that they spend the night in the
spare bedroom.

The problem is that one cat insists on banging on the door at night.
It's not a case of "ignore it, it'll go away" since he's been at it
for almost a year. Is there anything that I can do to make this
behavior aversive for him? It seems to be a case of getting up on his
hind legs and alternating down strokes with his front paws which makes
the door rattle rather loudly. If we could hook a generator up to him
while he does this, we wouldn't need to ever buy electricity.

Matthew
January 28th 07, 08:23 AM
Take a hair dryer get an extension cord put the hair dryer on full blast
the cats starts plug it in watch kitty run for the hills may take a couple
of times but he will get the picture

Also inappropriate urination could be a UTI

You could also take a coffee can full of marbles and when he does it shake
the can like no tomorrow once again kitty run for the hills


> wrote in message
oups.com...
> I've got two cats, age 10 1/2, and I'd like to keep it that way.
>
> My wife won't let them sleep with us, and, after an inappropriate
> urination incident, also requires that they spend the night in the
> spare bedroom.
>
> The problem is that one cat insists on banging on the door at night.
> It's not a case of "ignore it, it'll go away" since he's been at it
> for almost a year. Is there anything that I can do to make this
> behavior aversive for him? It seems to be a case of getting up on his
> hind legs and alternating down strokes with his front paws which makes
> the door rattle rather loudly. If we could hook a generator up to him
> while he does this, we wouldn't need to ever buy electricity.
>

Spot
January 28th 07, 03:35 PM
Did you have the cat checked at the vets after the accident? Cats don't do
this out of the blue when they do it's almost always a medical issue.

If you want peace at night let the cats out of the spare room obviously it's
not going to go away. Your wife needs to learn to deal with it!

Celeste

> wrote in message
oups.com...
> I've got two cats, age 10 1/2, and I'd like to keep it that way.
>
> My wife won't let them sleep with us, and, after an inappropriate
> urination incident, also requires that they spend the night in the
> spare bedroom.
>
> The problem is that one cat insists on banging on the door at night.
> It's not a case of "ignore it, it'll go away" since he's been at it
> for almost a year. Is there anything that I can do to make this
> behavior aversive for him? It seems to be a case of getting up on his
> hind legs and alternating down strokes with his front paws which makes
> the door rattle rather loudly. If we could hook a generator up to him
> while he does this, we wouldn't need to ever buy electricity.
>

Alan
January 28th 07, 03:59 PM
If it is the rattling of the door that is disturbing you, try shimming the
latch or putting a foam seal around the jamb to stop the door from rattling.
You can try putting some two sided tape on the inside of the door to
discourage pawing. To help keep the tape from permanently adhering to the
door or taking off paint when removed, try tacking the tape to your pant leg
4 or 5 times before applying. The tape works well for us in discouraging our
new addition from clawing the sofa.
Alan
> wrote in message
oups.com...
> I've got two cats, age 10 1/2, and I'd like to keep it that way.
>
> My wife won't let them sleep with us, and, after an inappropriate
> urination incident, also requires that they spend the night in the
> spare bedroom.
>
> The problem is that one cat insists on banging on the door at night.
> It's not a case of "ignore it, it'll go away" since he's been at it
> for almost a year. Is there anything that I can do to make this
> behavior aversive for him? It seems to be a case of getting up on his
> hind legs and alternating down strokes with his front paws which makes
> the door rattle rather loudly. If we could hook a generator up to him
> while he does this, we wouldn't need to ever buy electricity.
>

cybercat
January 28th 07, 05:53 PM
> wrote in message
oups.com...
> I've got two cats, age 10 1/2, and I'd like to keep it that way.
>
> My wife won't let them sleep with us, and, after an inappropriate
> urination incident, also requires that they spend the night in the
> spare bedroom.
>
> The problem is that one cat insists on banging on the door at night.
> It's not a case of "ignore it, it'll go away" since he's been at it
> for almost a year. Is there anything that I can do to make this
> behavior aversive for him? It seems to be a case of getting up on his
> hind legs and alternating down strokes with his front paws which makes
> the door rattle rather loudly. If we could hook a generator up to him
> while he does this, we wouldn't need to ever buy electricity.
>

ONE inappropriate urination incident? And now they are still confined
at night a year later? Tell your wife that giving him another chance to
prove he will only pee were he is supposed to is your only chance at
rest.

sheelagh
January 29th 07, 02:51 AM
On Jan 28, 4:53 pm, "cybercat" > wrote:
> > wrote in ooglegroups.com...
>
> > I've got two cats, age 10 1/2, and I'd like to keep it that way.
>
> > My wife won't let them sleep with us, and, after an inappropriate
> > urination incident, also requires that they spend the night in the
> > spare bedroom.
>
> > The problem is that one cat insists on banging on the door at night.
> > It's not a case of "ignore it, it'll go away" since he's been at it
> > for almost a year. Is there anything that I can do to make this
> > behavior aversive for him? It seems to be a case of getting up on his
> > hind legs and alternating down strokes with his front paws which makes
> > the door rattle rather loudly. If we could hook a generator up to him
> > while he does this, we wouldn't need to ever buy electricity.
>ONE inappropriate urination incident? And now they are still confined
> at night a year later? Tell your wife that giving him another chance to
> prove he will only pee were he is supposed to is your only chance at

> rest.

I agree.

I have a cat that knocks at the front door, which I guess is slightly
different to knocking @ night.Personaly, we find it rather amusing.

I appreciate your dilema, but I also feel that it has been some time
since you gave him his last chance.

Would it be so terrible to allow him another chance, rather than
locking him in a seperate bedroom?
Think about this?
Would you liked to be locked into a room at night, all night, every
night?


By all means, do go and have him checked by the vetinary surgeon, then
make sure that you have eliminated a UTI.Once you have done that,
surely he deserve's another chance?
We all have accident's, & I am certain that there must have been one
reason at that time to encourage him into doing it?(stress, UTI,
previous marking?)
If he is otherway's sound in every other way & has no problem's with
his litter tray at any other time, then I am fairly certain that it
will not happen again.

Be sure to make certain that there is no residual smell of the
previous accident(a back light will help you look for one if there is
one anymore), then treat it, IF there is one...If not, go for it.I am
certain that you will be pleasantly suprised.

By the sound of thing's- All he want's to do, is to be with you both &
share the warmth & cuddle's.

IF your wife will not agree to this, at least allow him to roam during
the house night?But if he does continue to feel the need to be near
you @ night, then I think the coffee jar & marble's is your best
answer.Cat's are very nocturnal, & I feel that the sound of the coffee
jar & marbles are your best bet.It will surprise him without hurtimg
him, enough so, as to not want to come in and find out what the noise
actually is.
I wish you well & it would be really good to hear out how it went for
you all... but do try & get your wife to at least try...what diference
does one single accident make in the whole picture of things?
Good luck!
S;o)
Good luck & let us know how it goes please?

Demon Chunky Style
January 29th 07, 06:28 AM
On Jan 28, 8:51 pm, "sheelagh" > wrote:
> Would it be so terrible to allow him another chance, rather than
> locking him in a seperate bedroom?
> Think about this?
> Would you liked to be locked into a room at night, all night, every
> night?

Isn't that how you trapped Paul?

> By all means, do go and have him checked by the vetinary surgeon, then
> make sure that you have eliminated a UTI.Once you have done that,
> surely he deserve's another chance?
> We all have accident's, & I am certain that there must have been one
> reason at that time to encourage him into doing it?(stress, UTI,
> previous marking?)
> If he is otherway's sound in every other way & has no problem's with
> his litter tray at any other time, then I am fairly certain that it
> will not happen again.
>
> Be sure to make certain that there is no residual smell of the
> previous accident(a back light will help you look for one if there is
> one anymore), then treat it, IF there is one...If not, go for it.I am
> certain that you will be pleasantly suprised.
>
> By the sound of thing's- All he want's to do, is to be with you both &
> share the warmth & cuddle's.
>
> IF your wife will not agree to this, at least allow him to roam during
> the house night?But if he does continue to feel the need to be near
> you @ night, then I think the coffee jar & marble's is your best
> answer.Cat's are very nocturnal, & I feel that the sound of the coffee
> jar & marbles are your best bet.It will surprise him without hurtimg
> him, enough so, as to not want to come in and find out what the noise
> actually is.
> I wish you well & it would be really good to hear out how it went for
> you all... but do try & get your wife to at least try...what diference
> does one single accident make in the whole picture of things?
> Good luck!
> S;o)
> Good luck & let us know how it goes please?- Hide quoted text -- Show quoted text -

Get someone to read this to you:
http://www.bcc.ctc.edu/writinglab/Apostrophe.html

James
January 30th 07, 04:40 AM
On Jan 28, 2:11 am, " > wrote:
> I've got two cats, age 10 1/2, and I'd like to keep it that way.
>
> My wife won't let them sleep with us, and, after an inappropriate
> urination incident, also requires that they spend the night in the
> spare bedroom.
>
> The problem is that one cat insists on banging on the door at night.
> It's not a case of "ignore it, it'll go away" since he's been at it
> for almost a year. Is there anything that I can do to make this
> behavior aversive for him? It seems to be a case of getting up on his
> hind legs and alternating down strokes with his front paws which makes
> the door rattle rather loudly. If we could hook a generator up to him
> while he does this, we wouldn't need to ever buy electricity.

If I hug or handle my cat too much while we're in bed she'll get up
and go sleep in the other room. Maybe if you bug you cats during
sleep they'll also stop sleeping with you without having to lock them
up.

Lynne
January 30th 07, 04:42 AM
on Tue, 30 Jan 2007 03:40:29 GMT, "James" > wrote:

> If I hug or handle my cat too much while we're in bed she'll get up
> and go sleep in the other room.

Rudy does that, too, but not the kitten. I have to peel him off my lip or
he'd stay attached all night.

--
Lynne

CatNipped
January 31st 07, 04:21 PM
"sheelagh" > wrote in message
oups.com...

> answer.Cat's are very nocturnal, & I feel that the sound of the coffee

Just picking a nit - sorry ;> - but cats are not nocturnal, they are
crepuscular (most active during twilight, dawn or dusk).

To the original poster...
If you have a strenuous playtime before bed, most cats will settle down and
sleep through the night. I agree with other posters that the cat should be
checked out for a UTI, then given another chance. I take pride in the fact
that my cats will honor me with their presence and cuddle with me at night
(I don't think I could get a good night's sleep without them - I surely
couldn't get a good night's sleep knowing they were feeling desperately
unhappy and trying futilely to "dig" their way out of a locked room!).

Hugs,

CatNipped

Lynne
February 1st 07, 02:49 AM
on Wed, 31 Jan 2007 15:21:05 GMT, "CatNipped" >
wrote:

> I surely
> couldn't get a good night's sleep knowing they were feeling desperately
> unhappy and trying futilely to "dig" their way out of a locked room!

I agree!!

--
Lynne