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kasofo
February 8th 07, 08:47 PM
Mini's a sweet, clear-eyed only child. She's a tiny thing, hence the
name Mini, about a 6 pounder. When
I met her she was living at a friend's house with 4 large territorial
cats that bullied her
and wouldn't let her eat. She was rail thin. It was love at first
sight for both of us and my
friend offered her to me.

So....14 years later, my boyfriend and I are considering a move in
together.
His female cat, Tiger, is a medium large cat, sweet, affectionate,
perhaps a little skittish.

My Mini I know is terrified of other cats and likes to pretend she's
fierce by yowling and picking
fights. It's all bark, though. When she does this to the neighbor cat,
he just looks at
her when she's going through these gyrations, like, as if he see's
right through it and
he looksat her like he's're watching a movie, or viewing a statue in a
museum.

What I need is tips on cat psychology as to how to help Mini to adapt
to Tiger, especially
since she's moving into Tiger's territory. I don't believe Tiger would
do her harm, but I do
expect Mini will be doing a lot of that yowling and exhibiting her
fighter bitch tendencies.

Any help is most extremely welcome. Any cat whisperer's out there?

blessings,
kasofo

Cat Protector
February 8th 07, 08:58 PM
You will need to keep these cats seperated for a couple of weeks. In the
first week you should allow them to sniff each other under the door. They
might also paw as well. I'd also rub your cat with a dry towel and present
it to the other cat so he can get used to her scent and he should do the
same with his cat.

During the middle of the first week, open the door a crack so the two cats
can see each other. In the second week take your cat out of the room she's
in and put her in a carrier. Then allow the other cat to sniff around the
carrier and in her room so he can get used to her scent. They will naturally
hiss at each other because this is normal behavior. By the third week allow
them to play with each other under supervision. They'll most naturally hiss,
and possibly fight but this is how cats establish the pecking order.

I do hope that both these cats are spayed and neutered and are up to date on
all their shots? Hopefully they've also been tested for FELV because if one
cat has it and the other doesn't, then you'll run the risk of the healthy
cat getting it.

--
Cat Galaxy: All Cats! All The Time!
www.catgalaxymedia.com

Panther TEK: Staying On Top Of Your Computer Needs!
www.panthertekit.com
"kasofo" > wrote in message
oups.com...
> Mini's a sweet, clear-eyed only child. She's a tiny thing, hence the
> name Mini, about a 6 pounder. When
> I met her she was living at a friend's house with 4 large territorial
> cats that bullied her
> and wouldn't let her eat. She was rail thin. It was love at first
> sight for both of us and my
> friend offered her to me.
>
> So....14 years later, my boyfriend and I are considering a move in
> together.
> His female cat, Tiger, is a medium large cat, sweet, affectionate,
> perhaps a little skittish.
>
> My Mini I know is terrified of other cats and likes to pretend she's
> fierce by yowling and picking
> fights. It's all bark, though. When she does this to the neighbor cat,
> he just looks at
> her when she's going through these gyrations, like, as if he see's
> right through it and
> he looksat her like he's're watching a movie, or viewing a statue in a
> museum.
>
> What I need is tips on cat psychology as to how to help Mini to adapt
> to Tiger, especially
> since she's moving into Tiger's territory. I don't believe Tiger would
> do her harm, but I do
> expect Mini will be doing a lot of that yowling and exhibiting her
> fighter bitch tendencies.
>
> Any help is most extremely welcome. Any cat whisperer's out there?
>
> blessings,
> kasofo
>