PDA

View Full Version : they won't eat canned food


ensoul
February 9th 07, 03:02 AM
Moe & Rudy are healthy indoor cats abt 1 1/2 yrs old,
neutered...they've stopped eating any brand of canned cat food but
still have a good appetite when it comes to dry cat food (it was done
slowly)

Is that a problem? They're still active, happy running around,
behavour is the same...I can't afford a vet before anyone dare gives
me **** about that before there was a we, my husband and I and we
could afford a vet....Rick unexpectly died, to be blunt along with
facing the loss of my love, my income went donw by 3/4 so I can't
afford a vet

is healthy for cats just to eat dry cat food? I get mixed ansewers on
this.

ensoul

cindys
February 9th 07, 05:30 AM
"ensoul" > wrote in message
ps.com...
> Moe & Rudy are healthy indoor cats abt 1 1/2 yrs old,
> neutered...they've stopped eating any brand of canned cat food but
> still have a good appetite when it comes to dry cat food (it was done
> slowly)
>
> Is that a problem? They're still active, happy running around,
> behavour is the same...I can't afford a vet before anyone dare gives
> me **** about that before there was a we, my husband and I and we
> could afford a vet....Rick unexpectly died, to be blunt along with
> facing the loss of my love, my income went donw by 3/4 so I can't
> afford a vet
>
> is healthy for cats just to eat dry cat food? I get mixed ansewers on
> this.
--------
Up until Alex was diagnosed with diabetes at the age of 15, he never had
canned food. Molly lived for nearly 17 years exclusively on dry food. Some
canned food is preferable especially for male cats, but life does go on
without it. We're not sure about Bullwinkle's age since we adopted him as an
older adult from a rescue agency (we think he was around 10 years old). He's
about 15 years old now, and I never gave him canned food until I started
feeding it to Alex last year. Amanda is 6 years old and has zero interest in
getting within 10 feet of the stuff. Daisy is around 10 years old. I've had
her for about 5 or 6 years, and she was never given canned food until Alex
started getting it. My understanding is that it is preferable especially for
male cats to have at least some canned food, but if they don't, they don't,
and life goes on. Just be sure to buy good quality dry food. It will cost
you more upfront, but it will actually save you money because it lasts much
longer (and is healthier for the cats). I'm sorry about the loss of your
husband, BTW.
Best regards,
---Cindy S.

MaryL
February 9th 07, 09:03 AM
"ensoul" > wrote in message
ps.com...
> Moe & Rudy are healthy indoor cats abt 1 1/2 yrs old,
> neutered...they've stopped eating any brand of canned cat food but
> still have a good appetite when it comes to dry cat food (it was done
> slowly)
>
> Is that a problem? They're still active, happy running around,
> behavour is the same...I can't afford a vet before anyone dare gives
> me **** about that before there was a we, my husband and I and we
> could afford a vet....Rick unexpectly died, to be blunt along with
> facing the loss of my love, my income went donw by 3/4 so I can't
> afford a vet
>
> is healthy for cats just to eat dry cat food? I get mixed ansewers on
> this.
>
> ensoul
>

Good quality food is much better for your cats than dry cat. Now that they
are accustomed to dry food, it may take awhile for them to adjust to the
change in diet. I use Wellness canned food. I thought it would be much
more expensive than the dry food I had used before I changed over, but I
have found that there is not as much difference as I expected because they
eat smaller portions. I use 1/3 can (5.5 oz. size) twice a day for each
cat, fed at 12-hour intervals or as close to that as possible. You might
want to start by sprinkling a little dry food on the canned food to serve as
an attractant. I felt guilty when I was first doing this because Holly and
Duffy would simply refuse to eat. However, they soon became adjusted and
now they eat it with enthusiasm. They are also much healthier -- beautiful,
glossy coats and weight remains absolutely stable.

There is a much higher incidence of UTI among cats that are fed dry cat
food, and that is especially true for male cats. If that were to occur, you
*would* need veterinary care and it would be vital to see one ASAP because
UTI can quickly progress from mild to critical to fatal.

MaryL

sheelagh
February 9th 07, 11:59 AM
On 9 Feb, 09:03, "MaryL" -OUT-THE-LITTER>
wrote:
> "ensoul" > wrote in message
>
> ps.com...
>
>
>
>
>
> > Moe & Rudy are healthy indoor cats abt 1 1/2 yrs old,
> > neutered...they've stopped eating any brand of canned cat food but
> > still have a good appetite when it comes to dry cat food (it was done
> > slowly)
>
> > Is that a problem? They're still active, happy running around,
> > behavour is the same...I can't afford a vet before anyone dare gives
> > me **** about that before there was a we, my husband and I and we
> > could afford a vet....Rick unexpectedly died, to be blunt along with
> > facing the loss of my love, my income went down by 3/4 so I can't
> > afford a vet
>
> > is healthy for cats just to eat dry cat food? I get mixed answers on
> > this.
>
> > ensoul
>
> Good quality food is much better for your cats than dry cat. Now that they
> are accustomed to dry food, it may take awhile for them to adjust to the
> change in diet. I use Wellness canned food. I thought it would be much
> more expensive than the dry food I had used before I changed over, but I
> have found that there is not as much difference as I expected because they
> eat smaller portions. I use 1/3 can (5.5 oz. size) twice a day for each
> cat, fed at 12-hour intervals or as close to that as possible. You might
> want to start by sprinkling a little dry food on the canned food to serve as
> an attractant. I felt guilty when I was first doing this because Holly and
> Duffy would simply refuse to eat. However, they soon became adjusted and
> now they eat it with enthusiasm. They are also much healthier -- beautiful,
> glossy coats and weight remains absolutely stable.
>
> There is a much higher incidence of UTI among cats that are fed dry cat
> food, and that is especially true for male cats. If that were to occur, you
> *would* need veterinary care and it would be vital to see one ASAP because
> UTI can quickly progress from mild to critical to fatal.
>
> MaryL- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -
I wouldn't pressure to be so rude as to imply any other , & I was
sorry to hear your tragic news too.

Both of the above postings are good and have excellent merit for each
argument.
In my opinion, my cats are very similar to my children...none of them
are very adventurous, so whenever you put something new in front of
them, they wrinkle their noses & look at me with a look that spells
PO-I-S-O-N!!
I find that I have to be very strict & even more stubborn than they
are, because If I was not, they would be ringing together & dancing
around me asking for 4 separate meals a day (4ids!)
If you want them to change food, do it gradually but firmly too.
Please don't make the mistake of thinking your cat will starve,
because they won't...They are just trying it on...
You must always remember that firm rule because it is very true, & it
is simply a battle of Will's when you come down to it!
Good Luck & let us know how you get on:o)
S;o)

Nigger
February 9th 07, 12:48 PM
On Feb 9, 6:59 am, "sheelagh" > wrote:

> is simply a battle of Will's when you come down to it!
> Good Luck & let us know how you get on:o)
> S;o)

right! and there's nothing like a little pang to give you a
revelation.

:)

Rene S.
February 9th 07, 02:56 PM
>
> Good quality food is much better for your cats than dry cat. Now that they
> are accustomed to dry food, it may take awhile for them to adjust to the
> change in diet. I use Wellness canned food. I thought it would be much
> more expensive than the dry food I had used before I changed over, but I
> have found that there is not as much difference as I expected because they
> eat smaller portions. I use 1/3 can (5.5 oz. size) twice a day for each
> cat, fed at 12-hour intervals or as close to that as possible. You might
> want to start by sprinkling a little dry food on the canned food to serve as
> an attractant. I felt guilty when I was first doing this because Holly and
> Duffy would simply refuse to eat. However, they soon became adjusted and
> now they eat it with enthusiasm. They are also much healthier -- beautiful,
> glossy coats and weight remains absolutely stable.
>
> There is a much higher incidence of UTI among cats that are fed dry cat
> food, and that is especially true for male cats. If that were to occur, you
> *would* need veterinary care and it would be vital to see one ASAP because
> UTI can quickly progress from mild to critical to fatal.
>
> MaryL

I completely agree with Mary here. I had a tough time switching over
my Tucker, but if you go slowly, it can be done. Here are my tips:

*Hide or remove all dry food. Out of sight, out of mind, as the saying
goes.

*Pound some dry food into a powder and sprinkle it on top of the
canned to help with the transition.

*Make a big fuss when you're preparing the food, so he'll think it's
something special.

*Be tough; don't give in and offer dry after the first day. However,
make sure your cat is eating a majority of the food. It's not good for
them to eat too little of the new food and lose weight too quickly.

*Praise your cat when he eats the canned food, or goes back to the
bowl/plate to eat more.